Build it: Real-World 4K Gaming Test Bench

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aarcane

Most of this looks good, but I would like to point out one tiny problem: You should NEVER. NEVER EVER EVER put your computer in a refrigerator. Even if you include a dehumidifier to remove environmental moisture and prevent condensation, you still have one MAJOR problem, and that's that the refrigerator (or even freezer) can't dispense anywhere near enough heat to handle what the computer is attempting to throw at it. You'll likely burn out the refrigerator or freezer well within a day.

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Nimravus

Can anyone point me to that auxiliary cooling fan that's hitting the GPU's. The fan looks like a noctua, I am interested in the flexible arm that's with it.... It would be great with my own open air setup. Thanks!

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AFDozerman

I'd love to have an open-air setup like this, but unfortunately, I think my cat would think otherwise; she's still missing a tuft of hair on her tail from when she got a bit curious the other day...

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JBB

Just a quick correction here, but 4K is 4x the resolution of 1080, not double (2.5k is effectively double). Let's do the math here quick: 1920px times 1080px = 2.07MP - 1080HD. 3840x2160 = 8.29MP, or 4K. It's hard to understand why it's referred to as "exactly double," especially when later on he says "it’s the equivalent number of pixels as four 1080p monitors". Either it's double or it's quadruple; can't have it both ways. 4 times the pixels is the same thing as 4 times the resolution. That's why we refer to resolution in pixels, because they're the same thing.

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aarcane

There's horizontal or vertical resolution, which is what most people mean when they say "double" in regards to resolution. Sometimes confused with ppi, again, when doubling.
In this context, the colloquial misuse of doubling means "we double the pixel count/density in one dimension, and accordingly in the other, raising the total density by 2^2". Or more generally, by m^n, where m is the pixel count multiplier, and n is the number of dimensions of display.

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tom_m

Doubling the resolution generates four times as many pixels. A square 4-pixel image has a resolution of 2x2. Doubling its resolution to 4x4 gives us a total pixel count of 16.

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dgrmouse

His well-reasoned point is that "doubling" a square 4-pixel image would result in two square 4-pixel images, not four. It is understandable that everyone has a different interpretation of the lingo, since the industry and the media change it on a whim (eg, 1080p a measure of rows where 4k is a measure of columns).

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JBB

Otherwise, cool build information. Looking forward to when 4k becomes more viable to the consumer

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RUSENSITIVESWEETNESS

Reminds us that 4K is bullshit, because graphics cards can't hack it.

One day, maybe, they'll catch up. Maybe.

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aarcane

Two generations from now, 4K monitors and the graphics cards to drive them will all be much cheaper, bordering on affordable. That's about a year and a half to three years, depending on how long this release cycle is for nVidia.

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LatiosXT

Remember when 1280x1024x32bpp (or32bpp in general) was something of a long desired dream? Or bullshit as you say?

Yeah, those were the days.

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RUSENSITIVESWEETNESS

It doesn't bother you that the media is hot to pimp 4K, although graphics tech isn't mature enough to support it? Having to drop three grand on video cards isn't something 99.99% of PC gamers are up for. In this light, I see the pimping as asinine, even a slap in the face of every rational consumer.

We're probably three years from having a single affordable graphics card that can adequately support 4K. Why then is some "expert" trying to sell us on tech virtually no one can afford? And after paying those inflated prices for multiple cards, you've opened yourself up to a new world of headaches trying to get any number of games to work with more than a single video card. Talk about NOT getting your money's worth....

They tried this a few years back, around the time Crysis rolled out. We were all supposed to rush out and buy three or four video cards to play that, too. Build after build recommended multiple graphics cards. Max PC editors told us over & over that we needed multiple video cards, despite the fact most games couldn't support those setups, and despite the price tags.

Maybe I'm the only one who doesn't like being sold a bill of goods?

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dgrmouse

One paragraph with benchmarks versus ten with obnoxious name-dropping plugs for crap that nobody in their right mind would buy ($40 for a set of color-coded cables)? If someone wanted to build a "real-world" 4k gaming machine, this article would be useless to them. Good job.

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cometvermont

@dgrmouse can you be anymore of a pretentious, stuck-up, "obnoxious" PC snob?

Nobody that reads Maximum PC wants "one paragraph with benchmarks" aside from you. (Well, maybe a few more.)

If you would like to build a "real-world" 4k gaming machine any better PLUS giving us readers who actually like to read many different options on price & aesthetics ($40 for a set of color-coded cables) in one paragraph I'd love to "read" that "article".

As for "readers" like "myself", I appreciated the fact that Maximum PC included so many words & multiple paragraphs explaining & outlining the many ways that a "reader" like myself could possibly build an affordable "4k gaming machine".

As for "you", "good job" on being a pretentious, stuck-up, "obnoxious" PC snob & "good job" on your use of quotation marks to get your "point across".

To Tom McNamara,

I loved the article & the "obnoxious name-dropping plugs for crap that nobody in their right mind would buy" because many PC enthusiast like myself actually like to have specific colored sleeved cables on ever single wire in their PC. Kinda like all the "Dream Machines" Maximum PC builds that are works of "color-coded" art.

Thank you for such an in-depth article.

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dgrmouse

"We tested from one GTX Titan to four, 1x GTX 690, 1x and 2x GTX 680, 1x 660Ti, 1x 7990, 1x and 3x 7950, and 1x 7790" - Ian Cutress, http://www.anandtech.com/show/7120/some-quick-gaming-numbers-at-4k-max-settings

"We pulled out our GeForce GTX Titan, 780, and 770 cards for a high-quality romp through seven of our favorite titles" - Chris Angelini, http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/pq321q-4k-gaming,3620.html

@cometvermont Give your sense of chivalry a rest. It's criticism, not an attack (unlike the litany of your rant). If you're saying that you'd rather have a prolix description of an open-air work-bench that no gamer is ever going to buy than test results from a series of video cards and games that tons of people have bought and will continue buying, then maybe you should reconsider who the "pretentious, stuck-up, obnoxious PC snob" really is.