Bell Labs Zips Past Google Fiber to Set Broadband Speed Record

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PCWolf

While a milestone in speed technology, its useless by itself. The best bet for this would be some sort of Hybrid technology, where the Fiber optic lines rune along the streets, while the XG-FAST is used to connect the home to the Fiber Optic line. That way, the 100 meter distance limit is not a problem.

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Hey.That_Dude

Perhaps we can look where this technology makes sense: home demarcation point. With this tech you can now get FTTH and transmit that gigabit signal throughout your home without ripping open your walls and putting in CAT. My question is whether this will work with a daisy chained system or whether this needs to be a point to point topology (as most old homes used daisy chain). It's pretty interesting tech.

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Rebel_X

Useless nowadays, so they are basically replacing STPs (shielded twisted pairs such as CAT5e/6/7 RJ-45 or phone lines RJ-11) with this!? For the mentioned distance this technology would be only useful in a small office or at best medium LAN without signal repeaters to overcome distance. 100 meter coincides with the same distance covered for the signal to transfer correctly by STPs without the use of repeaters.

So how does this exactly beats google's Fiber when google's fiber meant for WAN operations such as ISP-ing?

Edit: Oh! What an irony! Before G.Fast is even finalized, standardized or even used commercially in its alpha phase, an extended prototype named XG-Fast claiming better performance. An advice to Bell Labs since they gave us C programming language 50 years ago, If I was in Yamaha corp, I would sue them for the XG trademark lol.

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ImAGuest

I think Bell labs needs to read its own publications. I think it was Claude Shannon who talked about maximum speeds of data transfer through different materials. Copper will not hold a candle to fiber in long distances without having MASSIVE error issues. Besides fiber is a lot more secure.

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tacgnol06

Anyone consider that that average hard drive data rate is around 1Gb/s? Are we really reaching an era where we'd want more RAM just to buffer our downloads while they're written to the hard drive because our internet is too fast?

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PCWolf

Seems you are missing the point. What if you live with multiple people? I have friends who cant do anything when someone else in the house is watching Netflix. Or they cant play online games because someone else is hogging up the bandwidth. While this speed may be too fast for a single computer, it is not if there are multiple users using it at once. Also, this can also showcase what can be done with copper lines as apposed to running super expensive fiber optic cables into people homes. But because American ISP's (other than Google) are a sad joke when it comes to speeds with very very few if any coming near Google's gigabyte service.

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murphyslaww

So, let's get this straight. This would require a fiber fed node every 70 meters. And to the guy who said a fiber feed per passing is $5k. No where near that. Studies I've seen put typical PON passing at between $600 and $1200. This is why Google is charging, eventually, a $300 construction charge.

Apples and oranges people. This won't hit ten gigabit viably any sooner than cable will hit one gigabit cost effectively with docsis 3.1 as the line conditioning and plant cleanup needed for either to work will likely cost more than just backtracking and installing fiber.

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yammerpickle2

In a lab, over short distances, and will any normal cable provider pay for the equipment upgrade? I don't think this will impact that many people in the near future. I'm still hoping Google comes to my town soon!

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RUSENSITIVESWEETNESS

Anc Comcast owns too many legislators and judges for any of it to matter....

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PCWolf

"And Comcast owns too many legislators and judges for any of it to matter...." This x100

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vrmlbasic

Sadly

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chaosdsm

Really, Australia is already rolling out a nation wide Tpbs FTTH backbone for all internet services (yes Terabit per second) & we're jumping for joy over 10Gbps internet that's limited to a couple hundred feet & a few select cities???

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tacgnol06

How the hell is a home PC supposed to even tap into that, given hard drive write speeds?

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CAG_700

In a home where there are six people and each person uses at least two devices at once...streaming...downloading...webcam chatting, I think this would be great. Obviously one hard drive can't use that connection alone. It might be(or is) overkill for six people but in my home I have nine at the moment with each person with a smartphone, laptop or other electronics. There are times when I can't stream 1080p on you tube because everyone is on and throttling. When I'm in a middle of a fleet battle in eve I would rather have a good connection, again this connection may be overkill for commercial consumption now....but we will eventually need it.

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castrator86

So with the limited distance of these technologies you're basically telling me they're useless. The infrastructure overhaul that would be needed to make this viable to residencies wouldn't be better served in running fiber instead??

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Jieddo

These technologies are not useless, the only limiting factor is the rate of attenuation. Current dslam technology has a rate of attenuation around 10mbit/1000ft. These newdslams look to attenuate about 600mbit/ft and most of that looks to be caused by crosstalk. Telcos can easily get around attenuation problem by running a single fiber feeder 2 line to the serving terminal (the little box on the telephone pole that your home dsl/phone lines hook up to). This is exponentially cheaper than running FTTP which can cost upward of $10,000 per house and can be implemented in current FTTN DSLAMs . I work for a major Telco and I know how expensive and difficult it is to maintain fiber. It is succeptable to the same damage that copper suffers from in the field and the tools to repair fiber prohibitively expensive. A good fiber splice tool costs $3000 where a pair of snips and scotchlocks for copper cost $15. We are going to see a lot of these intermediary techlogies before we see a nationwide rollout of fiber. Congress may need to create a "Fiber" Bill to help subsidise the cost of laying fiber to every home in America.

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PCWolf

"Congress may need to create a "Fiber" Bill to help subsidise the cost of laying fiber to every home in America." Congress already tried that. The ISP's stole the money. Verizon is still stealing the money. The money that was supposed to go for the FIOS Network, is now being used to make improvements to Verizon's Mobile Broadband network. Taxpayers already paid for Fiber & in many cities across America, there are tons of fiber in the streets not being used because ISP's refuse to use it or are not allowed to use it. Google "Dark Fiber" for more details.

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vrmlbasic

Maybe some fiber could help Congress pass a bill...

(Also, taxpayer-funded subsidies suck)

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Hurricane99

You say the serving terminal as a box on the pole? Most serving terminals I worked on were not on the pole but at the end of a neighborhood. AT&T VRADS serve a couple block or so range. They are still trying to roll out enough VRADS for their U-Verse services but attenuation is still an issue because of the copper lines. These new speeds look great but I can't see it being very viable because the costs of upgrading the VRADs they are still installing. It will be 10 to 20 years before any major upgrades come in.

I think the more important thing would be able to provide service over longer runs of cable. So many customers I found were losing their OK but slow DSL service because of the huge push for U-verse conversions to ipdslams. Sure it had faster theoretical speeds but lower maximum cable lengths. The signal reliability seemed worse as well past x amount of feet on copper. It's the customers on the edges of service that suffer most when using copper.

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John Pombrio

Are the VRADS those obnoxious large green boxes that have fan noises coming out of them? Someone left one of the boxes unlocked near my home so I opened it up. There are some huge, expensive looking boards inside, air conditioning of some sort, a LARGE power supply, and a lot less wiring than I expected. I at least closed the door, heh. All that hardware and the salesman who I invited in saw the speed I was getting just shook his head as their best speed was half as fast. Cox can do 4 times the speed without all the hardware.

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Hurricane99

LOL at your Cox advert. It's also not always about D/L speeds. I've got friends who game on Cox and TWC. Although their speeds are always better on speedtest.net, they suffer far more from random disconnects and low performance on things that matter ===> search for netflix issues with comcast and the whole great net neutrality debate. Idiots continue to debate about 10gbps or 1tfps connections...it all comes down to reliabilty.

BTW, who cares what your idiot salesman could tell you. If you listen to them then you have no role on these forums. Salesmen for all the providers are nothing but subcontractors who just get more money for better metrics (sales).

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F0llin

Fiber makes far more sense. Unless they can make a fix for the distance issue. It isn't cost effective for ISPs (Phone Companies) to put in the infrastructure for this technology.

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Jieddo

The upfront cost of laying a single fiber line to a home would make most potential subscribers balk. $5000 on the cheap end to install. Would take over 5 years of that line being in constant service to recoup the installation fee alone. I just think the only way we will ever see real movement in fiber is if the government steps in with some money. I think what Google is doing is noble but notice they are only going to select cities that are rolling out the red carpet for them with tax breaks and expedited permits. Google would go bankrupt installing fiber to every home and still not reach 1% of the population.

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F0llin

The problem that I see with this, is that most customers are more than 100 meters from the cabinets that feed them. Sure this would work great if I had plant right in my front yard.

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GreenTurtle

True, but it will help with FTTN customers.

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NavarWynn

This is no-brainer for DSL providers. All the sudden they can blow the pants off of cable ISPs in pure bandwidth (they've been struggling to keep within shouting distance for years now). If they can do that while not drastically increasing rates, suddenly Comcast (and other cable providers) is going to have a hard time finding customers. Afterall, who would choose to deal with Comcast (ridiculous prices, bordering on fraudulent business practices, and data caps) if they didn't feel they had no choice?

I wouldn't be surprised if Comcast tried to use their bought and paid for FCC to ban these standards from implementation given the likelihood of interference with licensed FM radio stations (106MHz is right in the middle of the 88-108 FM range).

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John Pombrio

this works only up to 300 FEET and greatly falls off at longer distances! DSL has no worries.

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mynamewasstolen

Makes sense to keep pushing copper as far as it will go while fiber infrastructure is still a long way from being ubiquitous.

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LatiosXT

Good luck trying to get the negative innovators to do anything.