BackBlaze Analyzes Hard Drive Failure Rates, Dubs Hitachi the Most Reliable Brand

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Ghost XFX

WD FTW...

Used a Seagate once to replace an old IBM...

Ppbbfft!!!!!!

Didn't last a year. Now, with that said, I know I can get at least a good 4-5 years out of a WD with hard use. It could be better, but environment of operation is everything.

I'm willing to check Hitachi drives out to see if they're any better. I need a good storage drive for the games and other misc. files I have in mind.

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linkmaster6

Purely just my experience from the past 5 and half years of doing service work, I have had to replace a lot of Hitachi hard drives, and toshiba hard drives. We tend to rely on Western Digital drives here but only the Caviar Black, the blues seem to have a decent failure rate. But lets face it, in a world where statistic are bias and reviewers are often paid off its hard to take anything at face value, you can really only rely on your own experience

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methuselah

We've had the same experience.

We're an all HP corporate environment.

We've had to replace more Toshiba's and Hitachi's over all others.

I can't believe Hitachi is the most reliable. I personally NEVER buy them when upgrades are requested.

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maleficarus™

I have had 4 Seagate drives and not a single issue with any of them.

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jtrpop

Wait...

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supercourier

Feeling awfully unjustifiably smug after putting a Hitachi into my wife's build during the great Thai flooding disk crisis a couple years ago. Like today, often the cheapest out there.

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Exarkun1138

I've been using WD's for as long as I can remember, and I still have an old WD 80GB HDD in my "spare parts" collection that has Windows 98SE on it. I can put that drive into a Hard Drive Caddy and it still spins up, and I can still access that data! I have had only 1 WD fail on me ever, and I have bought at least a dozen or so in the past 20 years. I prefer WD as my HDD choice!

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kolt

My old HP Desktop had an Hitachi HDD in it. The mobo failed under warranty and for some reason they decided to replace the optical drive and HDD with a seagate. The seagate did not seem to have as solid as a sound as the hitachi. Not to mention the hitachi hard drive weighed significantly more. More metal = less expansion due to warming up and cooling down. So yes this makes sense to me. Not sure, I've had all 3 and never have had one fail. Still have an old Seagate Barracuda chugging away in my Pentium 4 server. Its average temperature is 48C[Drive runs hot] and has 45081 power on hours. Which translates too 5.14 years straight of being powered on. That's the toughest hard drive I've ever owned. Its been inside of many machines and has undergone many formats. At my PC Shop, I see sony's come in all the time with dead hard drives. 98% of them being Toshiba branded drives. So IMO, avoid toshiba hard drives. Hell even Toshiba themselves don't even use their own Hard Drives. They use Hitachi hard drives.

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MantaBase

I have always been told this by folks "in the know" but just thought it was preference. I wonder if WD has learned from them after buying them (they did buy them right?.

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Sir Hobbes3

Ironically i have a Hitachi drive in my PC running Ubuntu that sounds like its going to fail soon.

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muzicman82

Holy crap I've been saying this for years and no one has ever believed me.

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limitbreaker

I've been saying it for years too but people who know me do believe me. Except there are those who even after the numbers prove otherwise will still say that Seagate are reliable. I've yet to have one of my many WD fail on me while every single Seagate I've bought is now dead and my entire collection of Japanese anima dead along with it.

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ohsnaps1104

They were aware that Hitachi is a subdivision of WD when they did this right? WD bought them out some time ago.

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ShyLinuxGuy

I think we are past the days where we had drives that were almost guaranteed to fail (i.e. the Deskstar when it was produced under IBM--of all companies). WD, Seagate, Toshiba, Hitachi, whatever else--it's all 50/50, and any and all drives will eventually give up. I normally go with Seagate, but with my recent build, I chose WD.

I figure it this way, I don't have full trust in any brand. A cheap ExcelStor drive (and these were *really* bottom of the barrel, I didn't know about this brand until I encountered a machine with this drive) may outlast a $600 Fibre Channel enterprise-grade drive, you never know. I've seen drives older than myself powered up and running with no indication of failure. It all factors in to the particular environment it is installed in (temperature, shock forces and power) and basically the luck of the draw with that particular drive and whatever happened during the manufacturing phase.

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jtrpop

My sister and I had those exact Deskstar "Deathstar" drives, and never had a single problem. My sister finally retired her computer and the drive was still working after 10+ years. Go figure.

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devin3627

i stopped buying western digital because one i bought quit a day later and the western digital green is made with less metal to save money and be more environmental yet it f*cking broke when i scooted my computer case. since F*CKING then, i thought HDs were fragile china-ware. i'll never buy a western digital again, my computer teacher said he likes seagate's reliability the most.

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jtrpop

What does your English teacher think?

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limitbreaker

Your computer teacher is an amateur compared to the average mpc reader.

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d_orkgiallombardo

I've had the same experiences where WD never last and Seagates are reliable. Each model of drive is going to have it's own failure rates, regardless of manufacturer.

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$m

I'm going to don my large tin foil hat for a moment and bet that a good portion of very negative Newegg (and Amazon) hard drive reviews are PR smear campaigns from competing manufacturers.

In any case, my WD Blacks have never failed me. I even have one 15+ years old and still going strong (well, last time I checked a few years ago). That's why I keep buying them, even if they are more expensive. The only drive I've owned that has suffered catastrophic failure was a Seagate.

Now, I have been contemplating getting one of those large (maybe 4TB) "green" drives, but after reading what was said about them I'll definitely need to have a rethink.

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GrayWolfShaman

This article got my attention. I have my own preferences based first and foremost on reliability, going back to 2006 when I built my first PC. Since then I've probably bought and used around 30 spinning disk drives, built 6 PCs and 2 home servers (so a small sampling to be sure). My failure rate aligns with this report: I've purchased more WD than Hitachi but the Hitachi failure rate is less (I've never had a Hitachi fail - one of those drives from 2006 is still running). I've bought more Seagate drives than the other two combined thanks to low pricing but apart from one WD failure (a 75 GB Velociraptor), ALL of my failures have been Seagate. I've had to rebuild one of the servers twice due to data corruption and HD failure. Moving 8 TB of data off my server so I could start again was a PITA. I've sworn off Seagate, just to save my sanity. Burn me once, etc...

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jtrpop

They have confirmed what I knew for the last 2 years. Seagate reliability has gone down the tubes. I deal with a LOT of drives both personally & professionally from all different brands, and I experienced no less than 12 Seagate failures last year. Most of them were made in China. My Hitachi drives, working like a champ. I cannot recommend nor will I buy any more Seagate products.

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d_orkgiallombardo

So what they're saying is that they very specifically selected their hard drives and came up with these results. That doesn't tell me anything, aside from to stay clear of the low power options. Each model of hard drive from any brand is going to have different failure rates.
I honestly always go with Seagate when I can, because I've pulled out hard drives from 5-10 years ago, and every WD harddrive was toast. The only one that still worked was a Seagate. But regardless, I always go through the reviews before I purchase a new drive, there's a lot of junk out there from just about everyone.

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praetor_alpha

I've always seemed to go for WD drives. I've had a few Hitachi drives, but they have always seemed a bit too noisy; At least there's a reason for it.

Sometimes, I go to Newegg, read HD reviews, and LOL at the people swearing off entire brands of HDs.