Avast Warns of Widespread Security Issues Once Microsoft Abandons XP

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spaulding

Love these stupid reports. 9 out of 10 ATMs use XP, that's nice. How many ATMs are connected to the fucking internet? Intranet yes, internet no. Why would a company spend money to support old shit that the fewest customers have. If you bought a car in 2001 when XP came out you probably have a new car by now or have replaced TONS of shit in it making it a new car other than the frame. What about all that software that hasn't been updated on those XP boxes for YEARS because it's not supported? You can exploit that shit too. If it's a personal computer just run any version of Linux because it's probably only used for websurfing, email, maybe VTCs which Linux distros can handle fine and is easy as Windows. For businesses on XP, your business has already failed if you're running XP on workstations or any productivity machine because there's much better software and new OS's and systems are more efficient. Speaking of hackers, just say OS X is unhackable or Linux Distro blah blah and have them all get trashed as always.

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PCWolf

Want to use XP after Microsoft dumps it? Here are some helpful tips.

1: Instal a good quality Firewall.
2: Don't go browsing for "Uncensored" Media (porn).
3: Stay away from Torrent Sites.
4: Limit your Web Browsing to trusted sites only.
5: Use things like No Script & Flashblock to keep the Aids out.
6: Disconnect the XP PC from the internet when you are not using it.

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Sir Hobbes3

You can't really expect Microsoft to keep supporting XP forever! Some of the machines running it are ancient, I know some people who still have an old AMD Atholon CPU and nVidia FX graphics in an old Compaq with a 70gig hard drive. While i don't agree fully on Microsoft releasing Windows 8 when 7 was perfectly fine, (It should've been something along the lines of Windows Touch or Windows Mobile, a unified Phone and Tablet OS but we got windows 8) XP is 13 years old! It's time to start migrating to a newer OS. And if you do it soon you can still get Windows 7! You don't HAVE to get Windows 8 YET but Microsoft is going to stop selling it IN OCTOBER! Heck you don't even have to get Windows for all i care. Linux is gaining some popularity.

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misterz100

This post all the way. Time for XP to die. It's ancient, and honestly for an older system that cant keep up with software stick linux on it, all you could do is play old games and type anyway.. And with DOS box you don't even need XP for old games heh

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CaptainFabulous

For those that are saying XP is 13 years old and it's time for an upgrade, I disagree. Age has nothing to do with it. If what you have works well why fix what isn't broken? Do you throw out a 10 year old TV set just because it's 10 years old but still works fine? You might move it to the bedroom or basement, but you're not going to simply toss it because of its age.

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Orlbuckeye

Yes when your satelite and cable company says you must have a digital TV to get their programming. You don't throw things out because of their age you throw them out because their not supported anymore. You throw your record player out because you can't find the needle any more. You throw your 8 track stereo out because they stopped selling 8 tracks in the 80's and your tires of adding a new popsickle stick to align the tape with the heads.

I people say that they can drop XP because the software that runs their business won't run on anything else. Well that means that software company either dropped that product or went bankrupt. Because tech companies around today have upgraded their products many times since XP came out to take advantage of the technologies of today.

I was thinking the other I wish all those boxes of OS/2 I have came on CD's instead of Diskettes so i could test them on a virtual machine.

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misterz100

If it's not broken then Microsoft has even less reason to keep putting money into it. Why update something with no issues right? While where at it we should bring back VHS tapes, for old time sake, nothing wrong with those huh?

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CaptainFabulous

Absolutely nothing wrong with VHS, especially if you have a large collection and don't want to spend a ton of money to replace them with DVDs.

I said if it ain't broke, don't fix it. If a vulnerability is found then it's broke and needs to be fixed. Expecting people to simply toss their perfectly functioning machines and buy new ones, or attempt to upgrade them, both at a significant cost and effort, is unrealistic. People simply are not going to do it. Which is going to leave millions of PCs all over the world vulnerable.

This fiasco is likely to bite Microsoft on the ass at some point.

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Orlbuckeye

There nothing wrong with VHS and you can keep yours. Sony and others aren't stopping you as MS isn't stooping you from using XP. The problem is they aren't selling XP anymore meaning no revenue and all the expences to support it. Also is they are supporting XP the people aren't buying new HP, Dell and Toshiba pc's. People are buying more Crucial memory, Maxtor Hard drives. The computer business has many players and they all have to work together as partners so they all can survive.

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The Mac

VHS wears out however, at some point youll have to transcode it.

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misterz100

*EDIT* somehow it double posted that wtf Dx

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LatiosXT

DOS and CLI worked well for its time.

Why should we use GUI and multitasking OSes?

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CaptainFabulous

If your DOS or CLI machine works perfectly fine then you don't need a GUI.

My Raspberry PI doesn't have a GUI, and I manage just fine using the CLI. What purpose would it serve to install a GUI that would only eat up memory and CPU cycles when it works perfectly without one?

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ShyLinuxGuy

Microsoft shouldn't be expected to support Windows XP for an indefinite amount of time. It's original form is 13 years old, which is ancient in terms of technology. Even after service packs and patches, the OS still remains deficient. There was plenty of time for IT departments to plan for this eventual cutoff.

My particular place of work, which has around 2000 workstations, is completely off of XP, save for a few VMs here and there for specific reasons, and has been for about two years.

I wonder if these same people would be crying foul because Windows 3.11 or Windows 95 isn't actively supported.

Just be thankful, if you're a Windows user, that you're not using Linux =P. Ubuntu has a 5 year support lifecycle for LTS (long-term stable) releases.

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AFDozerman

Get ready for massive botnets made up of grandma's facebook machines and POS boxes.

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CaptainFabulous

This. Once the OS is cracked wide open the hackers are going to have a field day and everyone is going to point their fingers at Microsoft, who will likely just shrug their shoulders.

It will be interesting to see if MS gets sued at some point when the shit hits the fan.

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Carlidan

No, because Microsoft gave fair warning. Just because the consumer did not want to upgrade. It's not the fault of Microsoft if the consumer gets infected.

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SrKag

when it comes down to it just look what Microsoft is advertising..... Buy buy buy out every where on the next OS buy buy buy.... Money, all about money... Stop b.s.ing yourself its money form people to move on.

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SrKag

when it comes down to it just look what Microsoft is advertising..... Buy buy buy out every where on the next OS buy buy buy.... Money, all about money... Stop b.s.ing yourself its money form people to move on.

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steven4570

On one hand, its 13 years old and should be put out of its misery. On the other hand, how many XP machines are still out there? Microsoft could charge each machine a dollar to continue support with XP, they already have the guys in place to support it, that's just more money for their bottom line. But its 13 years old and there is a far superior OS out their that Microsoft has...time to put it down.

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Renegade Knight

Meh.

That's what antivirus is for. Catching crap before it can even execute an exploit and to lock it down if it does.

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John Pombrio

Steam has a report showing what their millions of users have in their computers. Win XP 32 bit is 5.96% and XP 64 bit .32%. So for Maximum PC users, we have to have very few XP machines left, right? (Heh)

This was a surprise tho. As for Linux users, it is surprisingly small number with only 1.3% of users. These are the folks who are all supposed to become Steam Box users or is Valve expecting a mass migration of the 95.17% of Windows users?

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Renegade Knight

Strangely I don't have an XP machine.

95, 98, 7, and 8.1. but no XP.

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LatiosXT

We have to keep in mind that every time the whole "Windows XP" market share comes about, we have to know is this a global thing or select markets?

If this is a global thing, my money's on pretty much most of the XP users are still in emerging markets that won't upgrade until their fleet of computers die.

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John Pombrio

Hackers have had 13 YEARS to work on Win XP vulnerabilities. Now it is suddenly 600% more likely to get hacked?

I really do hate these "security reports" from anti-whatever providers.

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Granite

On the one hand, people and businesses who are still coasting on XP really need to upgrade. Nobody can expect MS to support it forever.

On the other hand, kudos to AVAST for doing what they can for those XP hold-outs.

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fung0

Microsoft can CLAIM that Windows 8 is an "upgrade" to Windows XP. But if the functionality is different enough, users have an equal right to claim that Microsoft is providing no TRUE "upgrade" to their product.

I hate analogies, but try this one. If I have a car that needs new spark plugs, and GM offers to sell me an airplane, I might feel a bit miffed. "But the airplane is *better* in so many ways," says GM. "And it includes a full set of brand-new spark plugs." "But it's not really an 'upgrade' of my car," says I. "It's a different beast entirely, and in a whole different price bracket than the new set of spark plugs I came in for."

Now, we can argue endlessly whether Win8 is fundamentally different from WinXP. And yes, Win8 does does add lots of new capabilities. But it won't run well on most of the hardware that's currently running XP. So it's less of an "upgrade" than a total replacement. A huge percentage of PC users sees no reason they should have to pay big money for a whole new computer, with major new functionality they don't want, as opposed to being offered basic maintenance on a product that still works and which they're quite happy with.

There's no point telling these people they're "wrong." Cutting off support just means they'll keep driving with dirty spark plugs.

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Orlbuckeye

Try this one GM buys their spark plugs from Champion. Champion discontinues that technology of spark plugs and GM can only get the new technology sparks. GM will continue to sell those discontinued spark plugs until they run out of what they have in stock. See it's not just GM that deiced what they have in their cars its the people that make the parts, Firestone, the battery companies. Companies aren't forced to produce products that are no longer profitable and the government shouldn't force them to. So the customer has a choice keep then product with no support or buy the new model with support.

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Granite

1. I didn't say anything about upgrading to Win8. I just said upgrade. Heck, moving to Vista will get people back into getting support from MS.

Of course, for longevity of support, one might as well upgrade to Win8...but that's just my opinion about Win8.

2. For me, upgrading an OS is only part of the upgrade process. Software is the other part. Heck, if I were using MS-DOS on an old computer and decided to finally upgrade to, say, Win7 I would expect to have to upgrade my word processor, as well.

But then, I'd also think about upgrading my hardware, too. At the end of it all, I'd have a better machine, a better OS, better software and a better computing experience.

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Orlbuckeye

Yes 32 bit to 64 bit, IDE drives to SATA, SSD drives. I my self love big screen laptops. I had a 20.1" Acer and now my windows 7 machine is a 18.4" Acer. Now their is only one company that makes a 18.4" screen for laptops and that Alienware. The 18.4" market for screen manufacturers isn't that great but they but still be making a profit because alienware is still making 18.4" laptops.

In 2 years from now you won't be able to get a PC with an optical drive. You won't see any hard drives because 2 tb SSD's will be 150.00.

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Jeffredo

I have three PCs, all on Win 7, but I kind of agree with him. For those saying he's just wanting to sell more product, Avast! has a free edition for home use, so that's not altogether it. Unprotected PCs can be hijacked and used for malware distribution that affects all Windows operating systems. They should support it until it naturally drops down to a level where its usage isn't an issue anymore (like 98 SE which in 2006 had some minuscule share of the market). I've read that as recently as last month XP still had close to 30% of market share worldwide (and over 10% in the US). That's kind of reckless. The double standard of continuing Chinese support only for several more years is just stupid as well. It should be all or none.

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John Pombrio

The real money for anti-virus, anti-malware, and spam is from business users who need hundreds or thousands of machines protected. The free home service is just to get people used to the product, but will certainly include a TON of "UPGRADE NOW to BETTER PROTECT" e-mails and pop-ups.

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stradric

Of course Avast takes to fearmongering to sell more of their product. No surprise there.

Microsoft has already done XP users a solid by extending support for as long as they did. Apple certainly doesn't support its OSes that long. It's time for XP to die.

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Volleynova

The worst part is that Microsoft is extending Windows XP support in China, and will be providing content & security patches to them for the next several years.... they could just extend XP security support here in North America, really...

The upgrade path for businesses is poor at the moment anyways. Windows 7 is tough to find at the store, and is the obvious choice for businesses. Windows 8.1 is nice and refined and all but still not business oriented. Windows 9 isn't out yet.

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Orlbuckeye

Most business with over 25 pc's are buying volume licenses from Microsoft. Mainly because it cheaper and ytou get better support. They are not running out to Best Buy to buy Windows. No OS is business oriented the software used make it business oriented. I work in IT and we make Windows 8 so the user doesn't even know it's Windows 8. We give them a browser, email and their ERP, payroll or financial app they need to do their job and all they do is shut the PC down and start it up.

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LatiosXT

There's probably not enough of a market share in the US that uses XP for Microsoft to care.

Besides that you also have to think about who still uses XP and if it's even worth a hacker's time to penetrate it and exploit the machine. If it's a bunch of companies in emerging markets, then I wouldn't really care.

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wkwilley2

It's been a long 13 years since XP came out, it's time for an upgrade.

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The Mac

in other news: Water is wet.