Asus Takes Home Wi-Fi to Next Level, Introduces Six Stream RT-AC3200 Router

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krash3x

Sorry this only has 6 antennas. I don't even start considering a router unless they have no less than 8 antennas.

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schwit

ASUS showed the RT-AC87U back in January. Is it shipping - not that I can find.

Someone once said shipping is a feature. It's time for ASUS to put up or shut up.

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John Pombrio

Seems like a whole lot of overkill to me. I would think that having a wired link to my devices that require that kind of bandwidth would be a better option.

265 QAM is cool tho. I think it was at 16 and working on 32 QAM when I last worked on HP Cable Modem Testers (which were working out the DOCSIS 3.0 specs before they were finalized). And just read about beamforming which is another new feature due to the multiple antennas. Dang, there is a 4096 QAM, that would look pretty amazing in a vector signal analyzer!

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AFDozerman

Wow.

"If I don't have a need for it, nobody does!!!"

Some people just need to learn how to be happy.

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devin3627

all you stupid people don't realize that the specs of the router have to match the specs of the device connecting. a wireless N cant utalize ac technology. and the potential of the device has to match the router to maximize routers potential.

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krash3x

Thank you devin3627. Thanks to your alarming, and informative post I have stopped my self destructive habit of using a wireless N adapter with a wireless AC router. You have truly opened my eyes, and you are most definitely the greatest person on teh internets. After seeing how using wireless n on a AC router hurts people and ruins people's lives I have to wonder who could read this post and still live with them selves let alone continue this totally unacceptable behavior. Everyone that reads your post thinks that you are cool, and have to have tons of girlfriends.

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The Mac

lol

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Hey.That_Dude

Or you could calm down with your name calling and poor spelling. There are those of us with 802.11ac equipped items that would love the more robust and forward compatible nature of this router. Especially when you consider that all of the antenna are external.

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chaosdsm

Still in draft... really MaximumPC :( :( :( 802.11ac was approved before the end of last year http://www.ieee802.org/11/Reports/802.11_Timelines.htm

The ONLY real application for this router is for WAN cafe's (and then you better have an internet connection capable of sustaining the throughput if there are any gamers using it...) and some small office situations where everything is wireless.

As an "ac" owner, I can attest to the fact that a router such as this is a complete waste to the majority of home users at present time, even when tied to a 1080p content server. To fully utilize this ASUS router at home or in a small office, you need to have a server/desktop/NAS capable of sustaining 400MB/sec read/write speeds which means a 4 drive VelociRaptor RAID-0, high-end single SSD's, or RAIDed low-mid level SSD's. But even streaming 8 1080p movies simultaneously won't saturate this routers capacity, you'll need multiple streams of 2560x1440 or 4K content for that.

Once 4K video becomes commonplace and this router becomes “necessary”, the new 7Gbps WiFi (aka 'WiGig') revision will already be approved, with WiGig routers on the store shelves. And our damned internet connection speeds will still be lagging way, way, way, behind.... even though the Ausies have successfully completed a trial of terabit superchannel transmission over a 1066-km (662 miles) fiber-optic network in South East Queensland, Australia in March of this year, and others have demonstrated 54Tbps bandwidth in more limited testing.

Even with this WiFi card in my laptop: Intel® Dual Band AC 7260 802.11 A/AC/B/G/N 2.4/5.0GHz + Bluetooth 4.0 / WiDi (Wireless Display) | Up to 300/867Mbps (2x2) I have to get 10 feet or less (without obstructions) from the wireless router (Linksys EA6500 AC1750) to get better than 600Mbps connection speed. At 20 feet my speed drops down to about 300Mbps, at 50 feet its about 20Mbps. Add obstructions and speeds drop significantly, hitting about 2.5Mbps in my bathroom just 32 feet from the router, but that is going through two wooden walls (no drywall) & the ceramic tile wall of the shower...

Best internet connection possible at my location is 60Mbps or 10x slower than my WiFi capability, though I can only afford 10Mbps atm. I do have a 1TB backup drive attached to my router where I store all of my music, photos, & videos used on the laptop, but it maxes out at 492Mbps(62MB/sec) read & 384Mbps(48MB/sec) write. A dedicated & well setup NAS would saturate the bandwidth but to costly for me.

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Hey.That_Dude

Or at half the length we could get 1000 time the performance of your terabit network...
in 2012...
http://optics.org/news/4/1/29

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chaosdsm

DAMN... that's friggin awesome!!!

Still the Ausies have already started upgrading their backbone for commercial use on existing fiber-optic lines with a maximum theoretical bandwidth of 13Tbps over 1000km runs - only 80 times slower than 1.05Pbps, while it could be years before we see any petabit installations.

http://www.lightwaveonline.com/articles/2014/03/coriant-trials-terabit-superchannel-over-australian-nbn.html

Bottom line is this helps the tier 1 & tier 2 IP's deal with increased demands. But it doesn't do a whole lot (if anything) for home users who are not already on a FTTH provider. For those who are, they'll have to shell out even more $$$ to get faster speeds in the short-term.

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Hey.That_Dude

Still waiting for that future proofing with the 10GbE personally. This does look interesting despite that.

My Capcha for this post is: AGS64

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Obsidian

On some routers the antennas are a screw-in coaxial-type connector. If this is also that way perhaps we can use a coax cable to run fingers for this wireless system all over the house, lessening dead areas and making a strong signal even better in say - a back yard or garage.

I know the logical question then is to ask why not just run wired from point A-to-B but cell phones, VOIP, network music players, TVs and some Blu-Ray players no longer come with a provided 'wired' option.

Mark me as interested depending on how it can be configured and what aftermarket software I can put on it.

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RUSENSITIVESWEETNESS

So you run a coax from the router, through the walls, under floors or over ceilings, into, for example, a back bedroom, expose some small length of cable, and that serves as a functioning antenna?

Wild....

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Number Six

Hi Obs!!! Long time! :D

-[Ch]ams

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Obsidian

Hey there Chams! I still comment and moderate the public-facing site here, but then I can't ALSO be logged into the forums :/ ... so it's one or the other for me most days. But I've really been here the entire time; often writing comments that are too long and still misunderstood.

How are things?

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Number Six

Things are very well around here. No complaints. Miss the forums but, ya know, got busy... ;-)

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Hey.That_Dude

Be fore-warned that all antenna and data transmission cable is rated for 50 OHMS. This means that you will have to run special and different coaxial cable throughout your house to move the antenna there, as the standard TV coaxial you have in your house is a 75 OHM cable.

That sounds expensive but ironicly I've not found a series of tapers that allow for the conversion from 50-75 ohm and back that cost less than just rewiring... also I have no advice to give on what type of taper works best if you find cheaper ones. You'd have to experiment.

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ziggyinc

Can you use the old 50ohm cable that was used for the Cat-2 spec as cable for the antenna extenders? I still have boxes of that from long long ago.

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Hey.That_Dude

Assuming you can get the connectors to match up then: yes, it should "work". We are talking about shielded coax still, right? I've never used Cat-2 in my life.
Please also pay attention to the attenuation of the spectrum you're transmitting. You'll be transmitting/receiving from 2.4-2.485 GHz and from 5.18-6 GHz for the two bands. Most of the time you need some cable that has low losses at those frequencies. I know good RG-6Q has comparable performance to the 50 Ohm cable up to 1 GHz, but you'll be hard pressed to find info about attenuation past that frequency... which makes me hesitant to use it.

Use your friendly data sheet and find out what you're working with, then compare to products designed for this transmission. That's my best advice.

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Obsidian

That is excellent information to know before attempting this on any level. I'm not an electrician or low-voltage or impedance expert so any guidance like this is much appreciated.

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Innomasta

Steam in-home streaming here we come!

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Number Six

Good! My next router is in the works!

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MAIZE1951

Although ASUS makes some great products, I stay away from wireless routers because they are to easy to hack by an good hacker, and I prefer my CAT6 wired system in my home. Also this one by ASUS looks like it was cross-bred with an porcupine, LOL.

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The Mac

just throw on dd-drt or tomato, solves that problem.