avatar

Planar PX2411W

It’s easy to be seduced by the sheer size of a 24-inch LCD screen—any display that big just looks like it means business. And there was a time when large LCD panels were almost exclusively high-performance parts. That’s no longer the case. As the 24-inch LCDs reviewed here demonstrate, large screens are just as varied and prone to flaws as their smaller counterparts.

Click Read More for more. 

avatar

Westinghouse L2410NM

It’s easy to be seduced by the sheer size of a 24-inch LCD screen—any display that big just looks like it means business. And there was a time when large LCD panels were almost exclusively high-performance parts. That’s no longer the case. As the 24-inch LCDs reviewed here demonstrate, large screens are just as varied and prone to flaws as their smaller counterparts. 

Click Read More for more. 

avatar

Hanns.G HG281GPB

We hadn’t even heard of Hanns.G until about five months ago, when we tested the company’s HW223DPB. That 22-inch model’s 6-bit color, bare-bones build, and lack of HDCP earned it just a 6 verdict in our August issue. But Hanns.G is clearly stepping it up a notch with its HG281DPB. The monitor’s 27.5-inch screen and 1920x1200 resolution put it in a league with Dell’s stellar 2707WFP, but for almost $500 less—making us wonder if this is a bargain we should pounce on.

Click Read More for more. 

avatar

iZ3D 22-inch 3D LCD

Over the years, 3D displays have periodically surfaced, but none has taken hold. The public just hasn’t had the stomach for them. Cost has been one factor, but also, the stereoscopic imagery used to create a 3D effect tends to cause dizziness and nausea in users after even short periods. Nevertheless, vendors keep plugging away at the concept, hoping to capitalize on the growing number of games and movies produced in 3D.

Click Read More for more. 

avatar

Gateway FPD2485W

Gateway’s 24-inch LCD stands out in this crowd by offering far and away the most input options: VGA and DVI ins are joined by S-video, composite, and two component connectors, as well as four USB 2.0 ports. This LCD, however, also sports the most annoying OSD. Menu selections are accompanied by sound effects that are reminiscent of a Casio keyboard’s. And while there’s a healthy array of menu options to choose from, none appears to disable the menu’s audio. Twitchy touch-sensitive OSD buttons certainly don’t help matters.

Click Read More for more. 

avatar

DoubleSight DS-240WB

DoubleSight is best known for its two-in-one monitor solutions, such as the dual 19-inch display we reviewed in March 2007, but we’ll take a single seamless 24-inch screen over that option any day. The DS-240WB looks all business with a simple but sturdy black frame. Its telescoping neck lets you adjust the screen’s height, plus you can tilt, pivot, and rotate the screen’s orientation. Input options consist of one VGA, one DVI, and one audio input. To access the whole gamut of onscreen display (OSD) options, you’ll need to use VGA. For instance, you can adjust the screen’s individual color channels and even its overall color tone only with the analog interface; DVI limits you to contrast and brightness changes.

Click Read More for more.