Technology Comes to the Toilet

Technology Comes to the Toilet

But the Washlet S400 does much more than warm your bum. When you’ve finished your business, pushing another button on the remote activates a cleansing wand that delivers a soothing flow of warm, aerated water. You can choose front or rear wash; still, oscillating, or pulsating massage action; and two levels of pressure for the rear wash. After the water treatment, pressing yet another button on the remote activates a blower to dry you off (at temperatures ranging from 104- to 140 degrees Fahrenheit). This blow-dry feature is of particular interest to me, since I’ll be on a septic system (as opposed to a municipal sewer). The less paper down the drain the better!

To paraphrase Tim Allen (playing Tim "The Toolman" Taylor on the ABC television series Home Improvement) once cracked: "You've got oscillating, pulsating, and 'Who needs a man?!'"

And if that’s not enough technology for you, the seat (constructed from anti-bacterial ABS plastic) features a built-in catalytic deodorizer, which—according to Toto’s press materials—“uses activated oxygen to break the molecular bonds of odor and return clean air to the room no matter the ventilation.” Mmm... Nothing like a breath of fresh air in the bathroom!

And now, the moment you’ve all been waiting for. The moment when I finally get around to informing you just how much this bit of high-tech sanitation is going to set you back. (Come on, admit it. I know this seat has aroused your keen sense of techno lust.) The Washlet S400 sells for between $1,890 and $2,174, depending on color (choose from Cotton White, Colonial White, or Sedona Beige). You can also buy the Cotton White version pre-installed on Toto’s one-piece Carlyle and UltraMax model toilets (MSRP: $2,462 to $2,631) and their two-piece Drake model toilet (MSRP: $2,270 to $2,405).

Yes, Toto even thought to include a panic button.

Toto has some brilliant videos that explain how the Washlet works. You can check those out here.

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concernedITpro

Anything with enough juice to heat a seat and dry my undercarriage does not need to be within inches of both my privates and a hopper full of liquid; especially when it intends to coat said undercarriage with a nice spritz of water just to improve conductivity.


Besides that, you now have this portable germ vessel (the control unit) that can now occasionally get dropped down in the soup.


No thanks, I'll still with American Standard's Plain-Jane!

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meat67

I live in Japan. Toilet seats like this are very, very common here. I don’t have one in my cheap, rented apartment, but we have them at work. Lots of department stores, restaurants, etc. have them although most don’t have the raising and lowering feature.

The hot air will dry you off...if you’re willing to sit on the toilet for 6~7 minutes for it to do so. I usually do the wash and then 30 seconds of air and then paper. I do actually have more to do at work than sit on the toilet all day.

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Scapegoat

I think it's totally awesome! So if I understand right, the washing and air drying replaces wiping?

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VoodooChicken

I'm genuinely scared to check out the videos.

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Look behind you! A THREE-headed monkey!!!!!!!!

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Humpfester

When they add a auto wiper, I'm in.

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Kerzon

For the first time in my life I'm speachless to a MPC article....

Al Bundy on the other hand would be in heaven

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