NZXT Havik 140 Review

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NZXT Havik 140 Review

NZXT is new to the cooler game, but if the Havik 140 is any indication, the company isn’t being dumb about it. The Havik 140 is a hefty cooler in the stacked-fins “skyscraper” style, with six copper heat pipes rising from the heat exchanger through 4.25 inches of nickel-plated‑copper heat-dissipation fins. Two 14cm fans with white, wavy blades and black casings are strapped to the front and back faces of the heatsink in push-pull configuration using rubber-band-like straps, which are easier to use than the standard wire clips. The fans use 3-pin power connectors, and the cooler ships with a Y-cable to connect both fans to the mobo’s fan headers.

   
NZXT's Havik 140 marries two 14cm fans with six heat pipes and a passel of fins.

The cooler stands more than 6.25 inches high from heat exchanger to the ends of the heat pipes, 5.25 inches across, and (with both fans strapped on) 4.75 inches deep. Installation uses a now-familiar system—a universal backplate with four posts mounted in the appropriate holes for the socket and plastic spacers on the other side of the motherboard, upon which rest two mounting bars. A second bar runs between those two mounting bars and secures with spring screws, pressing the heat exchanger against the CPU. NZXT’s version of this mounting system isn’t as solid or as easy to use as Prolimatech’s, which remains the gold standard by which we measure CPU mounting systems, but it’s hardly the trickiest install we’ve ever done.

Once mounted, the Havik performed admirably, besting the Hyper 212 Plus in our stress test by nearly 18 degrees Celsius and slightly outcooling the Prolimatech Armageddon, our Best of the Best air cooler. And it didn’t sound like a jet turbine doing so—the fans were remarkably quiet. At $75, we’ll accept the slightly cheap-feeling mounting bracket. NZXT’s first cooler is great for overclocking.

$75, www.nzxt.com

NZXT Havik 140

DOGS OF WAR

Powerful, quiet cooling; not garish.

DOGS OF HOLLYWOOD

Mounting bracket could be more solid.

9

Benchmarks

NZXT Havik 140
EVGA Superclock
Thermaltake Frio OCKPromlimatech Armageddon
Hyper 212 Plus
Ambient (C)
24.1
2423.823.223.2
Idle (C)
42
43.541.7541.5*44.75
100% Burn (C)
73.75*81.75
75.574.592

Asterisk (*) denotes best score. Ambient represents ambient air temperature in the Lab at time of testing. All coolers tested with a Core i7-930 overclocked to 3.9GHz on an Asus P6X58D Premium motherboard in a Corsair 800D chassis with stock fan, 6GB DDR3 RAM, and a Radeon HD 5850 GPU. Clock frequencies measured with TMonitor; temps with HWMonitor. Stress tests performed with Intel's internal testing utility running at 70 percent load.

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Comments

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yassarian

I think you may want to adjust your benchmark numbers and change what's considered the *best* numbers.

Instead of simply putting an * next to the LOWEST temperature, you need to look at the *DELTA* from ambient.

For instance in this review, the NZXT ambient is 24.1, at idle it's 42, a difference of 17.9 degrees

You consider the Amageddon to have the best score, but that was done with an ambient of 23.2 and an idle of 41.5 - a difference of 18.3 degrees

From your own benchmark - it would appear that NZXT is the better performer. To simply mark the lower final temperature without taking into account of the ambient temperature makes the benchmark pretty pointless.

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oldobamaliar

you should state what TIM you are using

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nedwards

All my cooler tests use Arctic Silver Lumiere Testing Compound.

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