Zotac's Tiny H55ITX-C-E SFF Motherboard Packs a Punch

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Keith E. Whisman

After we load this puppy up we are still going to need an Cooler Master Cosmos case just to house everything. 

Unless there are ITX cases that can fully contain a water cooling setup for the graphics, chipset and processor and a 1000watt PSU and two optical drives. 

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mnjones

There's not much room for an enthusiast grade CPU fan. Water cooling I guess?

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Bender2000

Ummm, where would you add the third RAM slot for X58's triple channel? PS/2 is there so you can use the BIOS which comes before the USB drivers load. That is so lame though, and you are right it is unacceptable.

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Keith E. Whisman

USB keyboard works in current bios just fine. PS/2 needs to die. It's been here longer than USB, PCI (has come and gone), Not to mention AGP (come and gone too).  Without the PS/2 I'm sure they can make room for another memory slot. Maybe the boards needs to be slightly larger by a 2 or 3MM. I can live with 2 or 3mm's. A freaking mm is a very small thing. LOL..

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Havok

If PS/2 finally did kick the bucket, then you wouldn't be able to spy on people with the handy little PS/2 port key-logger device from ThinkGeek! Then again, you could always buy the USB flavor if you can't palate PS/2...

http://www.thinkgeek.com/gadgets/security/c49f/

I kinda do agree though. I have some old 'spare' PS/2 parts that are collecting dust in my closet, for the unlikely event my USB devices crap out. But if they do die, I'll just end up replacing the old USB stuff with new USB stuff... Oh well. That's the danger of being a tech pack-rat. "Hey, I might need that 512 MB SDRAM module someday," or "It's a perfectly salvageable 20 gig IDE HDD! It'll go great next to my two 2 TB Hard drives!"

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Peanut Fox

Even if they did remove the PS/2 slot (which they should) this is an 1156 board.  That socket doesn't support triple channel memory configurations.

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Keith E. Whisman

It would be better if it had the x58 chipset and support for the 980X 6core processor and SATA 6Gbs. In fact I don't understand why mobo's are being produced with any SATA 3.0Gbs at all. Why not just support the new standards whole heartedly? I mean come on, USB 3 and SATA 6Gbs are both completely backward compatible with the older standards. It makes no sense other than the mobo manufacturers just wanting to drag there feet. 

Use the old parts for business machines. Gaming and enthusiast parts should all be cutting edge. I can understand supporting Wifi b/g support but that should be about as much legacy support needed in an enthusiast board. 

And for heaves sake that better not be a PS2 port. That thing is legacy from the old IBM PS/2 desktop computers from freaking 1985 for crying out loud. Get rid of that freaking PS/2 port already. The next time I see a PS/2 port on a computer I'm going to barf. That better be an S-Video port and not a PS/2port.

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Mark17

At least it doesn't have a parallel port or an IDE socket taking up space. I don't mind the PS/2 port, and like the others said, it can be used for troubleshooting purposes should the USB ports fail to work for some reason. I can't count the number of times I've had to switch to a PS/2 keyboard when troubleshooting computers. 

Also, if you want a mini-itx board check out this article from about two months ago: http://www.maximumpc.com/article/news/jws_latest_itx_board_first_support_usb_30_sata_6gbps

That board has an AM3 socket and support for AMD's new six core processors. It has dual gigabit ethernet controllers, USB 3.0, and has SATA 6Gbps. Oh, and it does not have any PS/2 ports.

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Keith E. Whisman

Sounds like we have a winner with that AM3 ITX board. I was just thinking it would be awesome to have an ITX with big ass balls and what I mean by that is it has an X58 chipset with triple channel memory and support for the 980X 6core proc, with 8 USB3 ports and 8 SATA 6.0Gbps ports or at least come close to that and I was thinking the same thing about the other ports not being there as being something positive in this boards favor. 

Perhaps an ITX with two full size PCIX 2.0 X16 slots. One slot would be for a 2 TB SSD hard drive card and the other would be rocking an Nvidia GTX480 graphics card, 12gigs of ram in triple channel 4gigs per channel, a couple of SATA 6Gbps ports and at least 6 or more USB 3 ports, and an Intel Core I7 980X Six core processor in all it's glory sitting pretty next to the X58 chipset. Just give us Wifi A/B/G/N, 1x 10/100/1000 Network port and onboard sound preferably something with an XFi label on it. 

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orca11

Start tossing those cookies... it's a PS2 port.

Click the announcement link... Video is listed as DVI, HDMI (plus have you ever seen a purple S-Video port?)  If you look closely you can see the pin configuration too.

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CloudRider

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PS/2_connector

PS2 is a game console, gentleman.

And more to your point, Mr. Whitman, I still have perfectly serviceable PS/2 parts that I keep for just such an occasion wherein my main preipherals may break down for whatever reason.  I appreciate the inclusion of a PS/2 port if only to serve as a failsafe for such an event.

I'm actually very interested in this board.  Will make for an excellent 2nd machine that's more powerful than can be reasonably expected from a 'desktop replacement' laptop, while still being small enough to relocate without major hassle.  I'm keeping my eye on this one.

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Blues22475

That and if I ever have to troubleshoot a computer and the USB decides to not work, I have PS/2 to fall on. Just like I say with floppies: It's another means to aid in troubleshooting.

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Keith E. Whisman

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IBM_Personal_System/2

IBM Personal System/2From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Not to be confused with the PlayStation 2 (PS2) video game console.

IBM Personal System/2
IBM Personal System/2 Model 55 SXDeveloperInternational Business Machines Corporation (IBM)TypeProfessional ComputerRelease dateApril, 1987

The Personal System/2 or PS/2 was IBM's third generation of personal computers. The PS/2 line, released to the public in 1987, was created by IBM in an attempt to recapture control of the PC market by introducing an advanced proprietary architecture. Although IBM's considerable market presence ensured the PS/2 would sell in relatively large numbers, the PS/2 architecture ultimately failed in its bid to return control of the PC market to IBM. Due to the higher costs of the closed architecture, customers preferred competing PCs that extended the existing PC architecture instead of abandoning it for something new. However, many of the PS/2's innovations, such as the 16550 UART, 1440 KB 3.5-inch floppy disk format, 72-pin SIMMs, the PS/2 keyboard and mouse ports, and the VGA video standard, went on to become standards in the broader PC market.

The OS/2 operating system was announced at the same time as the PS/2 line and was intended to be the primary operating system for models with Intel 286 or later processors. However, at the time of the first shipments, only PC-DOS was available, with OS/2 1.0 (text-mode only) available several months later. IBM also released AIX PS/2, a UNIX operating system for PS/2 models with Intel 386 or later processors. Windows was another option for PS/2.

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CloudRider

:)

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