Windows OS: 64-bit is the New 32-bit

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jrbales

Have been running 64-bit Win 7 since it was released. A few problems with some software I was used to using on 32-bit Windows (mainly utilities) but otherwise no problems that would send me running back to 32-bit. Still use 32-bit on my laptop as after doing research it seemed like an iffy proposition. 

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mdkplus

I run WINAPPIX 192.168.10.1. ... It is Win 7, Linux, and Snow Leopard all sandwiched together. It says it needs no AV, is constantly updating, and keeps trying to run this command:

$ PATH=pretending! /usr/ucb/which sense
no sense in pretending!

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BAMT

Main desktop: OpenSuSE Linux 11.2 x64, Windows XP x64 Edition, Ubuntu 10.04 x64, Mac OS X Snow Leopard x64

Secondary desktop: OpenSuSE Linux 11.2 x64, Windows XP x64 Edition

Laptop: OpenSuSE Linux 11.2 x64, Windows XP Professional x32

Other computers: Various Linux distributions

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Trooper_One

Now that Win7 kicked asses, based on Windows history, at least one of the upcoming new version of Windows will suck.

 Anyone betting for Win8 or Win9?

 

 

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Trooper_One

 

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Trooper_One

 

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Jesterace

Windows 7 Ultimate 64bit on my Desktop

Windows 7 Home Premium 64bit on two laptops

Windows XP Home SP3 32bit on my netbook.

 

I used to dabble with Linux and alternate OS's but I keep coming back to Windows. Hell I even had Snow Leopard on my netbook and after that I ended up back with XP on it.

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Sexysev

Running W7 64bit. Before the W7 release I ran XP 64bit for years. xp 64bit was brutal though, no driver support what-so-ever! Thank goodness for w7!

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ShadowDragoonFTW

Currently rolling on Win7 64-bit. Before that, I was goin' with a dual-boot Win XP Home 32-bit / Vista 64-bit. To be fair, it wasn't all that bad once the Service Packs for Vista came out and it got a lot more stable. If you go and install Vista now and run all the updates, it's like an unpolished version of Win7. So, not as horrible as it used to be. Still a bit of getting used to compared to XP, though.

 But, enough of the Win7/Vista wars. The main point is the 64-bit capabilities. I'm lovin' my 64-bit OS. But, the main problem is that, if we keep rolling out OS's with 32-bit architecture, eventually they're gonna hit a wall. It already takes 2GB ram to run Win7, and the max on a 32-bit OS is 3GB. Another generation or two of Win OS's, and you'll have to go 64-bit. No ifs, ands, or buts about it... So, Microsoft (and every software company that's able to) should just embrace the change and start upgrading their architecture now, to stay a slight bit ahead of the curve.

 I'm looking at you, Valve, Bioware, EA Games, etc., etc., as I think gaming has the most to benefit from a good update.

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SuperiorBeing

Currently running Windows 7 x64.

I like how OS X can switch between 32 and 64 bit at boot. It seems like a neat feature.

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Frozen Canuck

I've been exposed to computers for some time. Remember CP/M? I do and I hated it! Remember MS DOS... the black and white text non-gui version? Yes, I hated that one too! When Windows 95 came along, I thought that it couldn't get any better. Okay, Windows changed and I've used most versions of Windows ultimately deciding on XP to stay with as my primary OS. I've tried several flavors of Linux in an attempt to get away from Windows, but had very little success... (I don't care about jumping through multiple password hoops to get into Linux. Just boot up, let me in, and forget the stupid command line!). I even tried Apple Macintosh, but that one left me with a major headache: Mac is just Linux pumped up on BSD Unix! (Who uses the #@$%&^! command line? It's 2010 people!) React OS? Ah, now there's my sweet spot! It is like Windows, but its not. It can run Windows software and some Drivers, but Macintosh and Linux binaries can be recompiled to install and run on it as well. Even though it is a 32 bit OS, React OS is the OS to watch, support and fight for. Why?

  • Because it is Open Source,
  • it works,
  • its free,
  • it isn't Windows, Mac, or Linux. (It's better. Oh, so much better!)
  • its free,
  • it runs gaming console emulation software with few hassles,
  • oh, did I mention that it's free? 

I think I'm in love... Goodbye Windows! Hello React OS! 

Staying Frosty...

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BAMT

I do really like the concept and work of the ReactOS project, but the last time I tried it it was really quirky and didn't have any drivers, so unless you're on an original Pentium, I think any of the other OSes you listed are better. Heck, even Mac with a custom XNU kernel with SSE emulation would probably be better.

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Michael Ellis

64-bit Win 7 on my HP desktop

Ubuntu Netbook (running without the netbook features) on my laptop 

32-bit Win 7 on same laptop (using graphical version of GRUB called BURG)

HP Pavilion Elite e9280t  AW020AV-ABA

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Mark17

I'm dual booting Windows 7 Professional (64 bit) and Ubuntu 10.04 (64 bit) on both my laptop and desktop at home. At work, I'm running Windows XP Professional (32 bit).

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ThunderBolt

Which isn't probably taken into consideration.

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nHeroGo

...I could run windows 98 SE on my Mac.

It would make me an interesting person.

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gothliciouz

what i'm looking foward to is windows 128-bit. lol we won't break the barrier of 16 exbibytes anytime soon!..so i guess i'll be happy using my 64-bit edition.

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Mighty BOB!

I was in Office Depot and Best Buy the other day since my roommate wanted to buy a new laptop and I was rather amazed (and proud?) to see that all of the laptops on display in both stores were running Win7x64 instead of 32.

I myself have an older laptop that I don't really use with XP Pro (32), an ancient Dell with XP Home, and then this beast of a computer running Win7 Ultimatex64.  I've also got another hard drive in this machine with XP Pro (again, 32, not 64) but I have only booted into XP a couple times since installing 7.

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darthtigger

This may be a stupid question...but...if I install the 32 bit version of Windows 7 on my puter and decide I would rather install the 64 bit version...could I do so with the same key or would I have to buy another?

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jgraves000

No, if you bought it retail, you can use the same key. Cause from what I understand it comes with 32 and 64 bit version.

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aldude505

That's a really interesting question... Can you do it? I would assume so, you would have to do a reformat/clean install because of the way the memory is addressed but yeah it should be fine because the key is tied to the motherboard. Now does it violate the EULA... that's a totally different story. I really have no idea, but I don't think the Microsoft police will be knocking on your door if you do it.

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Vano

The only problem on 64bit W7 I'm having is the codecs mess + virtualdub...

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I Jedi

When I built a computer for a couple back last November, I was sure to get them 64-bit edition, so that they could experience the full-grasp of the performance their computer was capable of.

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Fecal Face

Had 32-bit XP for a long time, and only switched to 64-bit when I built my computer. I didn't really have a reason to do so, other than the obvious RAM limit. The only regret I have is how a lot of the programs / utilities out there don't support 64-bit OS's. :/

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Zune HD = Happiness

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jgraves000

The only problem I have had with 64 bit windows is the lack of support for 16 bit applications, mostly some older games that I still enjoy playing, but dosbox and windows xp mode have solved those problems.

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Vegan

I thought XP Mode had no game support? Or does that not apply to REALLY old games that don't use DirectX or anything like that? Stuff from the early-to-mid 90s.

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Mighty BOB!

It's more like the other way around.  It doesn't work well with 3D-accelerated or graphics-intensive games.

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IFLATLINEI

My network consists of all 3 OS's. XP,Vista, and 7. All are 32 Bit rankly because I dont have a need for 64 bit. Yes its true that Xp and Vista had growing pains. I too would state Vista was the new ME and should be avoided like the plauge. But after SP2 Vista has been just as good as either of the other two OS's. Ive always taken the time to optimize my OS's to perform the way i expect. Using different tweaks and keeping things light. Another reason why 64 bit just isnt necessary for me right now. 

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gendoikari1

My main computer is Windows 7 x64, my laptop is Windows 7 x86 (stupid Pentium M...), while my HTPC is Vista x86. Getting Windows 7 on it means streaming my 300 or so GB of music and movies all from my main PC to the rest of the Homegroup (which is one of the better things about Windows 7).

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perryra1968

Can't do you-tube..can't do quick time.....can't do flash player etc, etc. I went back to 32 bit.

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Nitescape

Yeah FLASH doesn't work on 64 bit IE.

You have to use 32 bit IE or Firefox etc.

The way you can tell is to click the START ORB --> All Programs and you will see both 32 bit and 64 bit IE.

If that is not what he means then I dunno.

 

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Mighty BOB!

User Error.

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Vano

It's obvious the actual problem is between chair and keyboard...

All that works just dandy for everyone else.

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Paul_Lilly

Say what? Windows 7 64-bit can do all of those things.

-Paul Lilly

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heronhaus

Rocking 64-bit Win 7 and all those work great for me, too!

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noobstix

I rolled with 32-bit for a time until I upgraded to my current system.  I didn't have many issues software-wise with 64-bit as most of my games and programs installed and ran without doing "Compatibility Mode" or any fancy workarounds that involved "taking ownership of _________ file".  However, the IT guys at my dad's workplace began upgrading everybody's machines to 64-bit.  The trouble is, the version of AutoCAD that he and his fellow co-workers are using don't work under 64-bit.  On top of that, the server is still using a 32-bit OS.  Right now my dad gets paid for doing hardly anything since the IT guys have created a clusterf**k for his group.  While I would definitely agree that 64-bit is the way to go, I would rather see it being used on home computers rather than in a very large work environment where things can definitely go wrong in transition.

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CPU: AMD Phenom II X4 955 BE

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Talcum X

 When doing such a significant change to the way
clients operate, there needs to be a lot of testing in an isolated area to make
sure all the changes will allow all employees and the software they use to
continue to operate.  Obviously, that didn't happen as it should. 
Unfortunately, it happened a lot at the last place I worked.  The testing
procedure didn't complete and the areas that they didn’t' test, were the areas
that gave them the most grief.

Proper procedures and best practices need to be laid down and followed or this is what happens.

 

***********

Every morning is the dawn of a new error.

"In Ireland, there are more drunks per capita than people."  -  Peter Griffin

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Airheadq

I went from 32-bit XP to 64-bit Vista (SP1-SP2) to 64-bit 7. I rarly had any issues with any of the OSes. Everything pretty much worked. The jump to 64-bit was nice, since all 4 gigs of ram was there. Vista wasn't bad at all. It helped me transition into 7 a lot quicker I'd imagine.

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M-ManLA

I have a Windows 7 64 bit. I will never go back to 32bit. 

 

Electronically charged

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dmonkyking

Really makes no sense going 32 bit now days when processors are all 64 bit and things are only going to be moving more towards 64 bit anyways.  I always put a 64 bit copy of Windows 7 in all the machines I build.

Also, I think some people forget that XP was a buggy piece of crap when it first came out.  It was only until SP2 it really shined and became a viable OS.  I mean I liked XP as much as the next geek, but I think some people forget the problems that plagued it at first.  I have always advocated waiting at least a year after any MS OS comes out before installing it, because it usually takes that long to work on the kinks and stability issues.  Windows 7 is the only one I made an exception for, because it really is fairly solid right out the door.

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Zachary K.

i have not had a 32 bit sense the days of XP.

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andrewc513

I've been running x64 since the day Vista came out.  Call me crazy, but I get every new Windows at launch and never have issues (probably because of fresh reloads, the Vista-phobia stemmed from bogged down systems on weak hardware...)

I never jumped on x64 in the XP days because I didn't feel like spending money just to make the x86 --> x64 jump. I was happy enough with my current x86 XP.

As for Linux, I made the x64 jump on Ubuntu 9.10, was all x86 before that. 

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someone87

I switched to X64 back when XP X64 Pro came out, and then adopted X64 Vista, and now Win 7.

My wife's Win 7 Toshiba laptop is the only computer in the house not running X64 Win 7. Unless you count my old eMac, that's Panther. :P

All my customers are also running X64 (either Vista or Win 7) per my advice and support. I also agree with the article where X64 is the new norm, and rightfully so.

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Mighty BOB!

I heard that X64 on XP Pro was a huge hassle.  Or was that just the initial growing pains?  Otherwise I would have switched to XP Pro X64 a while ago.  (Doesn't matter now anyways though since I'm rocking Win7X64.)

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jgraves000

I briefly tried xp 64 bit when it came out and it was just a big failure, kinda like Windows ME. It was really buggy, blue screened all the time and it was a pain in the ass to find drivers. I don't think there was ever a lot of support for it.

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fuddco

Ignorant is a bit harsh,Vista had it's growing pains and put off alot of people who were used to XP "just working" I still use Vista,and will, untill I build another computer.

 

As for 64 bit I have used it on vista and havn't had any problems,It's about time we get away from 32 bit and I wish 128bit would be the standard(wishful I know)

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genci88

Atoned for Vista? That's a pretty ignorant statement when you consider that Vista blew XP out of the water.

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Phrish

 

Atoned for Vista? That's a pretty ignorant statement when you
consider that Vista blew XP out of the water.

 

 

Yeah, Vista blew sure 'nuff.

- Phrish

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Paul_Lilly

Good point. Other than the implementation of UAC, which David Cross, a product unit manager at Microsoft, admitted was designed "to annoy users," poor file transfer performance that existed for months until Microsoft released several performance and reliablity updates (and were later rolled into SP1), shoddy networking early on (again, something that was addressed months later with SP1), real-world hardware requirements (Vista on a netbook? Have fun with that!), and the whole Vista Capable lawsuit fiasco, there wasn't a whole lot to atone for.

-Paul Lilly

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swampfox357

It wasn't because it was all that great. It was because most XP users thought Vista was crap and were waiting for a new OS to replace it. Why do you think MS brought out Win7 so quick? Vista was the new ME.

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