Western Digital My Book VelociRaptor Duo Packs Dual 10K Hard Drives

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Valor958

So many people hating on HDDs... they've been just fine for many years now, but now that something better (in some ways) is here that somehow makes all HDD crap? Faulty logic if I've ever heard it. That's like saying all old cars are junk because new cars are 'better'... tell that to someone genuinely in-the-know and enthusiastic about cars and you're liable to get e-slapped.
SSD IS good, but still has some issues between manufacturers and drive/bios coders as well. Even within the past 2 years there were issues with random complete drive failure or erasure due to a bios revision or error. HDD may have more failure points, but you can get a LOT more for your money and have more options. Most HDD are durable and reliable enough after this many years of tech advancement that they work just fine for the average user. SSD pushes are more fad flair than necessity right now. You hear them pushing the SSD speed for laptops and desktops being marketed to casual gamers and net junkies... no real use there. Professionals, enterprise, and dedicated gamers are different markets.
Prices more appropriately, this could be a useful device. There are other products out there, sure, but this is the new thing for now. How about we let it release and get some reviews before dogging it too badly.

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jabelsk

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=96ytI9Ybf_A&feature=plcp

These are for use with thunderbolt technology to create very large and very fast arrays.

Chaining enough mechanical drives via thunderbolt will reach SSD speeds at capacities well over 5TB.

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gribittmep

RAID 0 is about as far away from the concept of RAID as you can get. There is no redundancy it just doubles the risk of loosing your data. Like they say A fool and his RAID 0 are soon seperated.

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kiaghi7

Not to defend RAID 0, and not saying it's good or bad...

However, please stop re-iterating misinformation about RAID 0, the chance of losing the data is NOT doubled. It is, and always was, the potential of a hard drive failure... No more, no less.

The iteration of lost data remains precisely what it was before, as with a solitary hard drive failing, or a single hard drive in a RAID 0 failing, the potential for failure is IDENTICAL, -NOT- double.

Having two possible drives to fail does not mean the odds are doubled in any way, it's like flipping a coin. There are only two possible outcomes, but getting heads on one flip does not make a second flip a certainty to get tails.

Now, does having two coins increase the chance of getting a heads?
You'd think, "well yes, I now have two coins, it's got to be double!"

Unfortunately that is not so, it's because you're not considering that the RESULT for one, does NOT influence the other. That is, a coin flip on one coin is not influenced by the other, nor do they cumulatively yield a result.

Having two hard drives working separately doesn't inherently increase their risk of failure by 100%, nor does having two hard drives working together. Their individual potential for failure is what it always was.

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Peanut Fox

Nobody says that XD

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gribittmep

Mention RAID 0 to someone involved in enterprise storage and you'll get ridiculed or laughed out of the building. RAID 0 is for fools looking to loose their data.

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pastorbob

That's too funny. When I worked in audio mastering the so called enterprise experts in I.T. were clueless one track minded quasi-techies. On one occasion they were at a loss as to how to purge a virus that had infiltrated the network. I had to bail them out. They were also the ones who lost all of my email archive while doing a system backup. I had my own backup and was able to restore it. Needless to say we usually spent a lot of time "laughing them out of the building".

Fortunately, all manufacturing and process related systems were hands off for them and we handled the maintenance and support within the department. We had a RAID 0 setup on one LBR (laser beam recorder)that ran 24/7 for four years before we upgraded it to larger drives. It then ran for the next two years without fail until the system was taken off line.

I think the real fools are people who make broad general statements based on OPINIONS.

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Hey.That_Dude

Mention raid 1 and they'll laugh at you too. This is a two disk system, enterprise uses on the order of tens of thousands of disks.
You wanna know what's really funny? It's that you brought in Enterprise to compare to a HOME product that tops out at TWO disks.

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Valor958

That's because he is just trying to act superior in a comments section... he needs an ego massage to feel good about himself apparently.
Comparing consumer to enterprise products is what is apparently getting YOU laughed out of this area. Congrats man... like they really do say, "It's better to remain silent and be thought a fool, than to speak and remove all doubt."

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Hey.That_Dude

Or for ~$800
I can get two OCZ Vertex 4 SSD's and stick them in raid 0.
~1 GB/s read
~ 800 MB/s write
Just over 1 TB storage

So why would i get this?

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Peanut Fox

Data redundancy. These drives are in RAID 1 to protect against drive failure. I think for the price a home server solution would be much better as you could grow it to accommodate. I suppose with this you do get good speed and portability.

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Hey.That_Dude

Anyone with only ONE back up anywhere is an idiot. my point is the for this price I could get a 1 TB back up that would almost saturate a 10Gb ethernet connection. Versus 1 TB of back up that barely matches a middle of the road SSD.

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Peanut Fox

And I don't disagree. For the price I'd look at another option. But as a complete package I could see it still having some use. 2 SSDs in your system setup in a RAID isn't going anywhere. That RAID is limited to that system. This box could be taken elsewhere and provide you with a decent amount of space with data redundancy.

You're right for the price you can get fast storage through an ether net connection, but you're limited by your own up and down speed, and every time you want to make edits or changes you've got to download your entire file before you can open it, which depending on the size can be inconvenient.

I don't see this thing being for people who want to just back up data local or otherwise. I imagine this is for people who need fast portable storage to work on one or more projects at different machines. The fact that it offers RAID 1 on a hardware level means that your work is at least protected from a common drive failure.

By limiting it to Intel's Light Peak they've made it pretty clear their targeting prosumers and up, not folks who just want to safely store their pictures.

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whitneymr

You've hit it on the nose with the target users. I'm a pro photographer and my guy that does my large prints has one computer for Photoshop, one for color correction, and a third for the print server running his 8 printers. He wants something like this because he needs a back up when his Ethernet goes down on him.

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avenger48

No one needs Velociraptors for backup. Throw in a 2TB External HDD for $110. The fact that it's an external hard drive makes backup even easier, since you can see and move all of it without screwing up your windows install. Just copy everything every night while you sleep and enjoy the speed by day. At most, you lose 1 day's work.

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Peanut Fox

Three times I said this isn't for people who just want to do backups of their data.

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Hey.That_Dude

Okay. Riddle me this.

Hypothetically, I'm a professional CAD User that works at three offices doing oversight on a "big" project. That is, the project is on the order of 400-600 GB uncompressed data. Why would I not find a way of having a hardware raid 0 ssd external drive that still connected via thunderbolt? I'd be saturating that connection and transferring data at the same speed that a Native ssd raid array would.
I get that i could have a raid 1 protection from the drive failing, but i could also half the storage and have a raid 10 with four 128 GB ssds that saturate thunderbolt, have protection from hardware failure and would be of a similar size to this external drive.

Long point short, No HDD is worth that much until you hit enterprise. Period. End of story.

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Peanut Fox

Because SSDs while fast still don't have the density that HDDs currently offer. It should be pointed out that with this unit you're not paying a huge overhead for the HDDs. Those Raptors are expensive, but you need to consider that this is a box with Thunder Bolt, and it has a built in hardware RAID solution that is bootable. It's also expandable out to 3 other units giving you a combined 8 drives with 8TB of RAID 0 storage. While they can match the HDD capacity, most motherboards RAID solutions don't even offer that. I don't know of any SSD device that can offer identical use case scenarios, and you can forget about it being affordable. The hardware and software that goes along with making this system work is why it's so expensive. Not the drives themselves.

If this box doesn't fit your needs that's fine. You have to go with whatever solution works for you at a price you're comfortable paying. But there are a number of situations where this device would be an ideal fit.

If you need the extra speed that SSDs can give. Go for it. But this is a compromise of speed, capacity, and optional data redundancy in a complete ready to go device.

Your use case scenario doesn't match your solution. You've got 400-600 GB of data, and you're trying to fit it on a 4 drive RAID 1+0 array with less than 256GB of usable space. Even in RAID 0 you'd still come up short on space by a large margin. 2TB RAID 0/ 1TB RAID 1 versus 512GB RAID 0 and 256GB RAID 1/0. Even if you went RAID 5 you'd still only have 384GB of space.

Even if you had an additional hundred bucks giving you a solid thousand. You couldn't buy off the shelf parts using SSDs that could meet every feature that is offered here. I like SSDs. A lot. I'm running 2 256GB 830s in RAID 0 as a C drive. They're fast. I get that, but I realize that they have obvious limitations.

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Valor958

Definitely not worth the price, but when if becomes more affordable I would be likely to buy.
Nice specs for sure, and using high cap, high speed HDD is a nice cost effective manuever against having to use a SSD for performace at the expense of capacity.

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Biceps

The specs are very nice, but I think $900 is a bit steep, even with the RAID - especially given the fact that most people will probably have to purchase a thunderbolt card to go with this. That said, it is a drool-worthy piece of hardware.

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