Want a Job? Fork Over Your Facebook Password, Employer Says

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h e x e n

Hahaha

facebook

lol

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misterz100

XD I don't even have a facebook account so this doesn't even apply for me.

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ray789

my roomate's aunt makes $83/hr on the laptop. She has been without work for 8 months but last month her pay was $8682 just working on the laptop for a few hours. Read more on this site...Nuttyrich . com

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57ashdot

I am currently in the job search process, and frankly, this is great news! Now all I need to do is bring in a recording device, have some idiot interviewer try to coerce me into giving him my login information, and score a nice lawsuit out of them. Money problems solved!

Seriously though, these corporations make me sick, they think they can do whatever they want. I hope somebody takes one down for millions for this crap. Soon they will be requesting us to sign off our 1st amendment rights as part of the hire process.

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btdog

"Soon they will be requesting us to sign off our 1st amendment rights as part of the hire process."

Your 1st Amendment right (to free speech) is a protection from the Government, NOT employers. And, no, you can't say whatever you want in a workplace. Don't believe me? Curse out your boss, or call a female "sexy" - you'll see.

As for the Government, you have lost your right to free speech. If someone doesn't like what you say, it is now "hate speech" which is a crime.

Sorry!

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Carlidan

"As for the Government, you have lost your right to free speech. If someone doesn't like what you say, it is now "hate speech" which is a crime."

Don't get what you mean. You're still able to publish hate speech. I haven't heard hate speech was a crime.

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Nimrod

You really are fucking retarded arnt you? Actually you CAN say what ever you want, its just that they can fire you.

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ApathyCurve

Hear that whirring noise? That's Aldous Huxley spinning in his grave.

This is clearly a violation of privacy, but it apparently hasn't been directly challenged in court yet. When it is, it'll be shot down. I'm not surprised some employers would ask for such information, just disappointed.

For my part, I don't have a Facebook account, since I view it as little more than the electronic equivalent of a Pleistocene tar pit.

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TheQ

For the record, I would LOVE a tar pit, and would be throwing every dead animal and piece of obsolete junk I could find into it. Then, in the future, the apes will be like WTF?

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mhouston100

HA HA got me

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Jox

It seems to me that this is already covered by the DMCA:

Circumvention of Access Controls
Section 103 (17 U.S.C Sec. 1201(a)(1)) of the DMCA states:

No person shall circumvent a technological measure that effectively controls access to a work protected under this title.

The Act defines what it means in Section 1201(a)(3):

(3) As used in this subsection—

(A) to 「circumvent a technological measure」 means ...to decrypt an encrypted work, or otherwise to avoid, bypass, remove, deactivate, or impair a technological measure, without the authority of the copyright owner;

As the copyright owner in this case is Facebook, unless Facebook has provided the hiring organization with written permission to obtain the password of a user account, any attempt to obtain said password by (as in this case) coercion or extortion would be deemed contrary to law. I'm not a lawyer, and haven't been near a law book since grade 12, but it seems pretty cut and dried to me.

I could be wrong.

-Jox

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keyboardJuice

This is not the only issue. I've read somewhere else about a person who was refused a job because he / she did not have a facebook account. For some reason, the company said the person was suspicious.

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dhoge88

change your facebook name? say you don't have one anymore? problem solved? but yes it should be illegal. companies arn't allowed to ask if your christian or muslim, gay or straight, so who says they should be allowed to have your login information. i use my password for a few different things. might aswell hand over my social security card while i'm at it.

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Typo91

If they had my login credentials, they could read the dirty private messages between my girlfriend and me. My wife wouldn't be to happy about that!

I think this is a bad idea

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Penterax

How can this be legal? You aren't allowed to ask a person about privately held beliefs, such as sexual preference and religion, how could asking for private account credentials be legal?

I can understand wanting to know if someone is of good character before you hire him, but becoming a criminal to do it is going a bit far, I think.

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PolardOOd

No they shouldn't be able to ask you that. What does whats on Facebook have to do with rather or not you can do the job at hand? If they asked me for my Facebook info I'd say, sure...as soon as you give me yours.

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Baer

Just don't use Facebook as a web substitute. Don't use it for primary e mail, don't stay logged in, don't post stuff that you do not want others to see.
If you are adult enough to apply for a real job realize that there are so many dishonest people out there that employhers have to be careful. If you posted it in public then expect it to be used to measure you as a possiable employee.
Now having said that I am totally against employers asking for the FB password but come on, stop being iKiddies and using facebook instead of real e mail and real web searches Etc. There are many more ways for them to see what you have been posting than by simply getting your password. If you post it assume it can be read, password or not.

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Jox

"If you posted it in public then expect it to be used to measure you as a possiable employee."

Well, now - here we are at the heart of the issue. Exactly what is public? Is something posted on Facebook considered public? Not only do you need a valid Facebook account to see what's going on there, but you also have to be invited to join the friends list of the person in question.

Unless one is stupid enough to set one's account permissions to open, and unless the details of one's Facebook profile can be obtained via a Google search, it can hardly be said to be "public" information.

-Jox

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sasquatchua

It's actually illegal for job interviewers to ask you whether you are married, have children, what religion you are, etc... all things they'd potentially be seeing immediately when they view your profile or your wall via your account. Hell, maybe even "liking" a failblog video or onion article would rub the interviewer the wrong way. Making your interview's success contingent on handing this over is bad both legally and from an HR perspective - they could end up making a subconscious snap judgement (positive or negative) based on something completely unrelated to your work capability.

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Eoraptor

Sorry, but no. I don't care if the job is between $65,000 a year as manager of customer service or flipping burgers. I'll go and flip burgers. If you can't trust me enough to hire me, I don't want to work for you.

And I agree with the poster who said that if you're going to ask for my credentials, then I want to read the CEO's private communiques as well. tit for tat.

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schwit

Any company that doesn't do proper background checks could be hammered even more if the employee does something criminal.

On the other hand I might send the HR person who requested my credentials a fake email from FB saying that they've been notified of forced access to FB accounts. Any future violations will result in the HR, CEO and the company's FB accounts being terminated.

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Hey.That_Dude

This is in direct conflict with the policies on Facebook. You're NOT supposed to share your password with ANYONE! SO that'd be my response first.
Then if they insisted I'd say that I actually don't have a Facebook and that the page they are looking at in an unofficial and unwanted use of my name and that I had no prior knowledge of it's existence... you know, the wounded person game.

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jghellion

I'm amazed that some people are ok with this practice. It's bad enough that you can be turned down for a job for having bad credit (bad credit history.) but now they went to scrutinize how you behave outside of work too?

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LatiosXT

Two thoughts raise from this:

1. What's wrong with a simple background check?
2. What does my private life have to do with business? Those two things are separate and one should not matter when concerned with the other.

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icebird

I wouldn't provide such information of course, unless perhaps they let me log in to and read the CEO's emails for the past 30 days.

At any rate, my Facebook login credentials are stored in KeePass and I wouldn't recognize my password if my own fingers typed it. You can't give up what you don't know.

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praack

the TOS of many accounts disallow the practice and will allow Facebook to ban you.

you will also not know when they are "finished" with your account so you can reset your password - and remember- HR is now checking your friends facebook as well looking for bad behaviour that would reflect on you.

alternative is set up two facebooks- one for the HR guys and the other for real life - never tried it = but might work

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Valor958

You’ve got to be willing to look at this from both sides. With unprecedented access to the details of others lives, asking to see your Facebook isn’t really a request that is that far out there. I would only expect that level of interest for jobs paying a reasonable living wage however, say $45k+ a year. In positions paying that much, it’s likely you’re off work activities are of greater interest to an employer since you’re a larger investment than the average $10/hr stooge. Regardless of what many people may think, you represent the company you work for when you’re off work hours more than you’d think. Imagine the headlines… “John Doe, manager for XXX Bank, arrested for exposing himself to school children while high on ecstasy… more at 9”. Yeah, stuff happens and that sort of publicity can kill business for a long time. If your Facebook has friends and ‘likes’ of drug related activities and posts about how out of your mind wasted you get almost weekly come Friday after work… you are probably not an ideal employee option for a professional environment.
There is PLENTY of room for abuse, profiling, discrimination, and other various ethical issues that arise from demanding/requiring unlimited access to your social network of choice. Asking to be ‘friended’ isn’t an unreasonable request, however requiring you to hand over your login info is WAY out of bounds. As others here have noted.. login info is confidential and should never be shared. Heck, even the ToS for Facebook in particular state not to do such a thing. If Facebook wanted, it could delete your account over this willing breach. Though Facebook is nothing but a tool to socialize, it is VERY important to a lot of people due to the way society has changed. Forcing people to hand over this info to the interviewer without even the assurance you even HAVE the job is just completely unreasonable.
I’m not for or against these practices, but am in favor of putting through certain addendums to existing profiling and discrimination laws to include social network biasing and how such information should be handled. I don’t think it should be made illegal, but should be shunned, and being denied a job due to adhering to common IT practices and the web sites ToS should be considered discrimination. Then comes the issue of how to treat those without a Facebook, Google+, or whatever. They do exist. Would they be denied under the assumption they’re ‘probably’ lying to avoid incriminating themselves in some way? I wouldn’t even have a Facebook if my wife hadn’t made one for me… she felt I needed to ‘socialize’ more. I prefer face to face conversations… you know, like our grandparents used to do things.
Overall, this is a very slippery slope (forgive the old term) and can lead to a huge array of complications for those in dire need of a job. In today’s online world however, this was inevitable. I’m honestly surprised this hasn’t been reported more about 5 years ago.

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anusbreath

That is one of the funniest things I have read this week. Thanks for that good laugh. I guess if you want to live in a trailer park and buy all your clothes at goodwill, and have a 20 year old used car, then yeah, $45,000 would be a just barely "living wage" ha ha ha ha ha ha.
I'd rather kill myself than live like that human garbage. I make more than twice that, and I'd consider my wage a "living wage"

I'm an enormously long way from rich, and I don't live some extravagant, opulent lifestyle. I live a NORMAL, fairly simple, semi-satisfactory life on my income. I can't afford a $40,000 car, like sheetloads of people can. I can't afford MOST housing in my area. Many houses start at $500,000 and tons and tons in the classified ads in the paper are a million or more. Just the taxes alone on a million dollar house would be $25,000 a year. I also have no kids. I dread the thought how miserable I'd be with kids on my income. I guess a lot of people are o.k. living in life's gutter. I have slightly higher aspirations.

Yet at the same time, I'm just scraping by compared to what so many people apparently have and are able to afford, so I laughed my mucking ash off when I saw you say $45,000 is a living wage. Oh my god, i'm still wiping the tears of laughter away. That's a good income for a 22 year old college graduate, but horrible for an adult that has some years in a career behind them.

Oh, and the thing about the bank manager exposing himself to children. In California (I live in Washington), there are lots of cases of school teachers molesting kids. The most recent one is the teacher that put his own jizz on cookies and fed them to students. The teacher's union is so effing powerful, they worked it so this guy got to keep his pension for life, meanwhile he sits in jail awaiting trial. But many teachers that molest kids, they keep their jobs for years because the unions are so effing powerful and make the process of firing a teacher nearly impossible. And in the meantime, the teachers still get paid.

Oh man... I'm on a giggle fit, I need to go now so I can roll on the floor some more... ha ha ha ha ha ha.

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Biceps

I agree with you on all but one point. When an HR rep asks you to "friend" them, I think it is unacceptable; actually, I believe it is illegal. As an earlier poster noted here (and as I've argued on other sites), once that HR rep is your 'friend', they now have access to your marital status, your ethnicity (most likely), your sexual orientation (most likely), probably some of your medical history (who doesn't post about when they have a bad flu or a chronic back problem?). Some of these things would be visible even if you put the new 'friend' under the highest level of privacy. If I were asked by an HR rep to 'friend' them, I would ask them specifically what information they were looking for. I would then inform them that the above information is available on my Facebook, and then give them the chance to retract the request. If the still asked for it, I would refuse.

I would also like to say that in the large organization I work for, it is forbidden to 'friend' your manager or an HR rep. People still do it, but it protects the company from the type of situation above.

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gmcboot

I am sorry, but an employer or potential employer does not have the right to any information about your personal life outside the walls of their organization. Should the company have access to your voting record. How about you personal medical records. They should also have access to your spouses or significant others Facebook page, because the spouse is also a reflection upon you and therefor a reflection of the company. Also if you have children, their Facebook pages should also be accessed. Maybe they should have access to your psychiatric records, just in case. Personal Email. You phone log. Text Messages.

See the point is they shouldn't be allowed to look into any of these things. YOU are an employee, not piece of property being purchased. A company shouldn't be allowed to tell you if you want to work for them, then you have to give up all of your rights of privacy. Hey.. maybe they can put cameras in your house. Tap your phones.

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Valor958

I agree that perhaps 'friending' could pose other legal issues and perhaps provide the information that they aren't allowed to ask for. Forgive my slip there, as I really don't use Facebook and am not overly familiar with it. I never got into the whole online social network thing since Myspace was 'big'.. and Xanga.
A right to your outside information and personal life, no.. but a vested interest in it, yes. Some of the things you listed come across as trying to be sensationalist and not entirely reasonable. Not to say those situations wouldn't arise, and honestly they legitimately do in some scenarios. I don't think Candidate A wants Job Seeker who guns for the opposite political party B working for him. Those are unique situations and usually skirt the laws anyways.. as a lot of politics do. But i digress!
As for some of the other points you made, if ANY of it is public record (which some items may be) than it's fair game, however unfortunate it may be. Your personal life does reflect upon your work life to the degree they can be kept seperate. This is where some employers are wise and accept the 'gamble' they take when hiring anyone. Anymore, many employers aren't willing to risk the gamble and want it all upfront, making a snap judgement about situations which may never have affected your work. Just as unfortunate is that most of the people looking for jobs can and will be pushed around as privacy and other concerns this can involve come second to protecting and providing for your family. It's a trade off that MANY are willing to make.
Thankfully, some state are already taking steps to work against this, so there I say, support thema dn work to get your own states to follow suit. I doubt anything federal will ever push through as that opens up WAY to many other bad options, but state level enforcement is acceptable and preferable.

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gmcboot

They do have a right to find and public information that they can find, however, they do not have a right to ask you to MAKE certain information public so they can have access to it. If they go to a Facebook page and the only thing they can see is your name, then that's the only public information they have a right to. I was being sensational because those other areas I mentioned are areas where if someone were to ask we wouldn't think twice about telling them to go jump off a short pier. Social Networking is still very young, but as long as your information is locked behind your password and you use the tools for Facebook to control who see what. Then they should have no right to ask for your password to access it. HOWEVER, if the HR manager is friends with someone you are friends with and they see some of the stuff you post through your friends page.. you are screwed. I have heard of instances where staffing employees will find a friend of the perspective employee and friend them in order to see the perspective employees posts.

It is the employers market right now, and we better wake up and realize that if they get too much power and control, they will roll back each and ever advance we have gotten in the past 100 - 120 years.

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Valor958

Taking things to a more personal note on this, I personally feel like most here that this is complete bs and most people know it. A post farther up actually points out a law, not sure of the jurisdiction it falls under and did not care to look it up, that actually covers these situations quite well.
The HR/interviewing person present is attempting to coerce you to circumvent the established security measures which would in that case be illegal under that law. Perhaps it is not widely known, but some affluent/influential community members should be made aware so they can put it through to the media and spread the word that employers are breaking that law (if applicable in their area).
If I were asked, I would politely decline and state my reasons without getting upset. In this somewhat new situation, some employers may find it a good 'test' question to see how you react based on what reaction they are looking for. It SHOULD NOT be asked, but probably will be in many more situations that it should.
Education and freedom of information can do wonders to fight real injustice. To me, this is an injustice being committed against many honest people trying to do no more than survive. It's no wonder many are compelled to do more less than legal actions to get by in the world.

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Morete

Organized labor can influence a company’s HR practice by adopting softer Human Resource hiring practices than hard ones. Time to get organized and allow present and future workers to have a voice.

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chop_slap

What a bunch of crap. I would have laughed in his face so fucking hard that it would cause me to extend my middle finger to his face and then tell his insecure ass to get some real HR skills.

Plus, who would be so dumb to work for such a crooked company like that one??

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compro01

People in need of money to continue living.

Welcome to an employer's market. If you won't accept our absurd terms, there's 20 greater than or equally desperate people right behind you.

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georgey

I once had a recruiter ask me for my Facebook login so she could make my account more attractive to prospective employers. I guess it's getting to be sort of standard practice these days.

I refused since I don't have a Facebook Account and just got a job on my own.

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Valor958

This is a situation that is what I would consider a reasonable request. Facebook has turned into a great job search and recruiting tool. The most common thing to do in situations like this, or for anyone actively looking for a job/better job, is to make a seperate Facebook and fill it with things supporting the good points about you. Make it look legit, but 'like' things that relate to positive hobbies and friends who are doing well for themselves and responsible as well. It's about putting a positive spin on your online identity to make you more appealing. It's no different than using 'creative' wording to describe menial work done at a minimum wage job in the past.
Congratulations on finding a job though.

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B_H

I thought this would be a cute (or cruel) question to ask for an IT position. Ask for their account login info, and screen out those that give it up.

Sharing login credentials is a big no-no. You dont want your admins to be so easily socially engineered, do you?

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eday_2010

You can always say the following:

"Okay, but in return for my credentials, I will need to see a copy of your financial books, including payroll. I need to make sure there is nothing going on in this company that could be embarrassing to me or put me into any legal complications".

They'll refuse, saying that is confidential information, to which you reply "So are my log-in credentials. Your IT department should have informed each and every one of you that you never share your credentials or passwords with anyone. That holds true for people that don't work here as well."

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chop_slap

You're being way too nice, put some salt in there. Geez.

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pridehoff

I like eday's response. Will the person asking for my Facebook information be willing to give me his or her log on id and password? I would like to know about some of the people I may be working with.

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DogPatch1149

Straight from Facebook's TOS:

"You will not share your password, (or in the case of developers, your secret key), let anyone else access your account, or do anything else that might jeopardize the security of your account."

I'd point them to the TOS and tell them I am not jeopardizing my security or risking loss of my account by sharing my password with anyone or letting anyone else access it.

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Peanut Fox

While this seems good, it would look like you'd valued Facebook more than a prospective job offer.

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DogPatch1149

I guess it depends on how much I'm willing to give up for a job.

I've had a couple of offers rescinded when I wanted to modify the non-compete agreement, but I simply wouldn't give up my right to work in the same field for a competitor if I was fired or laid off. I feel the same way about giving up personal data and providing access to things that aren't any of their damned business.

If a prospective employer wants me to willingly violate a TOS agreement so that they can violate my privacy and trample on my right to free speech...well, not only won't I work for them, but I'll spread the word about them as far and wide as possible.

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Leadfingers

Correction:
It says that you value your *privacy* more than a job offer. Which any blue-blooded American out to agree with.

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tehLazyNinja

If I'm not mistaken, does submitting a friend request enable them to browse your profile while they decide whether to accept?

That could be the procedure. You request the prospective employer as a friend as part of the interview process. They see what they need. When the interview is over, unfriend them with no repercussions.

Perhaps this is an improvement opportunity for Facebook. They can add a new type of association. They're probably already looking into it.

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smartguy05

Its easy, just tell them politely that giving your login credentials to others is against Facebooks' terms of service and could result in the termination of your account and is a breach of contract, and contracts are things you take very seriously. That way it turns a negative situation into something showing you have a good ethic.

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szore

...you're good...

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jnite

Let me put it this way. Would it be acceptable to allow them access to anything else private that you have to login to access? Amazon, non-work email, a website if you owned one, your computer at home?

The answer is probably no (I can't think of anything). So why should it be OK to allow them access to your personal, private (not everything is Public) Facebook account?

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