Tougher Energy Star Standard Now in Effect

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Keith E. Whisman

Damn 153Watts is crazy for a device thats turned off. Come on. With LED TVs I think it's possible to produce a large screen TV that can sip power at 108Watts but the sound system is going to suffer. We are just going to have to accept that some devices are going to be power hungry when turned on but when off they should be off except for the trickle thats needed to keep data alive in volatile memory or user adjustable settings in a ROM. There just is no way in hell a surround sound speaker system is going to pump out wonderful sound with a limit of 108watts. So TVs can get the all important energy star seal that actually I've never used as a basis for making a purchase but I'm sure someone out there only buys ES devices.

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violian

Can't be right....320W when turned off? If that's the case, I'm thinking of leaving work early just to go unplug my tv from the wall - lol.

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NAYRhyno

Wait, wait, wait... 320 W while powered off? Revised to 150 W while OFF?? Is this a typo or the real spec? If it is true, that is insane. My television uses <3 W while off (meaured at the wall with a Kill-a-Watt).
EDIT: Ok I read the source article. The spec refers to when the TV is on. So 150 W for a 50" is decent. Of course it depends on the brightness and backlight settings, but still it is something.
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timmyw

While people often forget the load all these devices use when they are "off" the referenced article states that 318 watts was the maximum allowable while turned on not off as you state.

This is also part of the problem, most people have no idea what a watt is or what it represents. 300+ watts is a significant amount of power. I looked at that figure and immediately thought no way, that figure has to be wrong. Most people understand MPG and how much a gallon of gasoline costs. Very few understand KWh and how much one costs. This is why trials of meters that show usage in dollars and located inside the home lead to as much as a 20% reduction in electricity usage.

I have to concur that Energy Star rating is all but useless. The companies do there own certification and can configure the product in a way that a consumer would never use it just to get the rating. The GAO report on the Energy Star program shows that outright fraud is easy.

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big_montana

Energy  Star Cert is a worthless, sham and bogus program. IF you read the Washigntom times you would know that in March "the Government Accountability Office [GAO] released a report on a $300 million Department of Energy program designed to promote commercial products that boast fashionable 'green' credentials. A team of GAO investigators with an uncharacteristically fine sense of humor submitted 20 bogus products to the department and walked away with Energy Star certification for 15 of them, including a gasoline-powered alarm clock." All this Energy Star program does is cost the consumer billions of dollars in the end with no perceived benefit as they stamp anything that comes through with Energy Star approval without testing.

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violian

yeah, I agree. I did some work in this field where we submitted our products' specs to get the E-Star ratings - and although we never lied because we have high reputation in the industry, there are many loop-holes in process. The E-Star program just simply cannot afford to look into every submission they get - just impossible.

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major_tom

Let's be practical: no one's buying a gas powered alarm clock (aside from one in their car or a backup generator when the main line goes dark). Energy Star isn't the police, but it's not a scam either. It's propaganda, it's a commercial, it's an ad campaign, and if just a few manufacturers take it seriously then it's not only worth it, it's working.

 

As tech moves from Edison's incandescent tungsten filaments, to CFL, to LED, to OLED, energy savings are becoming more important in marketing products (especially battery powered products). Sure, Energy Star could label any product as "green", but as a consumer who only has so many dollars to vote with, I usually research and verify that claim before I buy. In fact, there are several consumer magazines who usually report when a given product uses more than it's fair share of the electricity and help me decide if there's a trade-off that's worth the extra watt or not.

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big_montana

But the purpose of Energy Star is so you do not have to do all the above research before purchasing to make sure they live up to the label. Any product labeled as Energy Star is supposed to be Green, but not all are, as the manufacturers know they do not test the products. The size and scope of governemnt has been growing for teh last 10 years, so do not tell me they cannot test teh products, they can, if they stayed off the net and quit surfing for porn and just did their job. Not having enough time is no excuse in my job, and is definetle not an acceptable for a government agency as well.

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tri8gman

The device still has its power rating printed on it... If you really care and aren't just a sucker for marketing, you read that label or buy something like the Kill-A-Watt.

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