Survey: One in Four U.S. Households Don't Have Landlines

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BobbyPhoenix

I haven't had a landline since 2003.  I'm currently using a N1.  In my area for a basic landline phone I would pay $45.  All I get is calling.  I pay $50 for my cell, and I get calling, messaging, internet, apps that do everything from work to playing games.  I think the extra $5 is well worth it, and the best part is you never have to worry about switching services if you move.  You just take the phone where ever you go.

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Vegan

When my 60 year old mom ditched her landline, that was officially The End.

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Mighty BOB!

Cell phone cancer studies perhaps?

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inahayze

Let's see, I pay 22.00 per month for unlimited calling on my landline, vs 40.00+ for a cell phone with limited use- I'm staying with the land line. Sorry, I have no interest in following the school of fish.

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BlazePC

Define unlimited calling.  Unlimited local?  Unlimited everything?  And be more specific when comparing land to cell, define what limitations you get with a cell that is unlimited on your landline. I don't know who you have for a landline carrier, but 22.00 per months sounds like some kind of limited plan, with no long dist, no features and no out of zone calls.  Hell, FCC and local communications taxes are usually 4 to 5 bucks alone...

Who you have for that landline anyhow?

Just curious...

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inahayze

Service=Verizon (2.22 flat rate unlimited service, dialtone line 9.40, non published number 1.50, all federal taxes come to 8.65, a few other small charges) total=21.97

I don't use any other services (caller ID, blah, blah blah). I let the answering machine screen the calls. Simple, and works perfect for me. 

I don't have a need for a cell phone. When I'm at work, call my desk phone. When I'm at home, call my wall phone. If I'm in the car, leave me alone (there must be a reason for laws against use while driving-figure it out). When I'm at the store, I don't need to call anyone to tell them what I'm looking at. When I'm with my friends, it's just that- I'm with them- I don't want other intrusions- it's rude- leave me a message.

As for Evolution- this type of stance is used to make non-users feel as though you are not progressing, and stuck in the past. The same advertising angle used by cell phone companies and computer/software companies. Most people are blind to persuasion used on them by ads and media. Study it before you reply about it. Also studies and articles like this are designed to to persuade too. Most people fall for it, then will defend their action so they don't look gullable (pointing to the fact that "everyone is doing it" - "we are the majority and you are the minority". Why are you not following the pack too?)

The problem is that large companies and their use of media and advertising is highly based on
psychological studies about what people need, and how to persuade them to buy. Their sole purpose is to extract money from the masses. Read about it before replying. The tactics are old and work well. Microsoft knows them very well. People mostly don't think for themselves (they think they do). They are constantly watching what everyone else does, then comparing themselves to fit in ("oh, look what my neighbor just got- I gotta get one too!"). Most people need to have a feeling of "fitting in" because it's safe- you aren't different. BUT, individuality and thinking for yourself, based on your very own "logic" and "reasoning" (while quite rare today) is a true sign of truly using you own brain- not following the school of fish! 

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BlazePC

OK, your landline setup sounds about right then.  If you had a long dist plan, then your monthly would jump, either by way of raw charges or a bundled plan.  Assuming you don't do a lot of long dist, then the cost proposition makes sense. But, if you do do long dist, then a cell phone instead of a landline can make good economic sense.  It really comes down to usage levels.  The bonus with a cell is that you have portability (in case of emergency) on the road or during longer travel.  Obviously if you're one not inclined to travel at all then that benefit is a moot point.  Another thing, you can always treat your cell to behave like a landline - or change your own behavior to think of your cell as a landline.  What I mean by that is you can just as easily screen calls or even shut the damn thing off.  As you can see, lifestyle has a bunch to do with it.  Having both seems to be a waste; having either one as the only communication source makes more sense depending on overall "rate of usage" versus recurring cost.  Bottom line, if you're a talker and live remote from family and friends, then the cost and convenience advantages of a cell are undeniable.  If you tend to be off doing other things and don't have a need for convenient connectivity, then saving the roughly twenty bucks a month with only a landline can really add up - assuming you don't have greater offsetting long distance charges or bundled services.  Pretty simple stuff.

 Not sure I follow the context of all the "everyone else is doing it" line of thinking, but I would agree that people who have big landline bills AND a cell are just wasting money better spent on other stuff.  One or the other makes perfect sence to me in most circumstances.  To each his own I suppose...

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inahayze

Forgot - Out of area charges are .35 per call, no time limit.

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Atomike

I'm with you - I have a landline for most phoning - and only a pay-by-the-minute cell phone for emergencies. I have no need to talk for more than 5 minutes per month on a cell phone. Can't understand how anyone would need more.

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IFLATLINEI

Theres many reasons why people find cell phones necessary or even more convenient. When they do theres no need for a landline. 

Things that need to finally die.

The Postal Service

The Newspaper

Fax machines

The landline phone

AOL

Just a few off the top of my head 

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timmyw

Well, the rest of us "fish" choose to evolve, grow legs, and go mobile.

I kept our lineland for quite a while, but it got to the point where I never used it. Everyone (except telemarketers) would call me on my cell phone because they knew they could reach me regardless. With the home phone I was only there a small fraction of my waking hours.

Why continue to spend $20 a month if I never use it. Yes, it does cost more, but it also is usable all over not just one location, it also has more features than the minimum landline I had. So it might cost two times as much but it covers me 24/7 unlike the landline. I'm hoping eventually more and more competition will drive the cost of true unlimited plans down even further, even if I don't come close to using the minutes I got.

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sammy_sam

 

Why the hell does the centers for disease control care if we have a landline and/or cell phone???

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Cruzg10

i was going to ask the same thing. i wouldnt have expected the CDC to come up with this study. id figure theyd be busy with trivial things like "disease" and "prevention" and stuff like that.

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BAMT

I only have landline and it's amazing: no hourly annoyances and the ability to dial into old BBS systems that are still up. It also helps that dialup is free (for now, anyway).

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lunchbox73

Amazing? Why would you be using BBS systems? Why are you using dial up? What the heck are you talkign about Dude?

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BAMT

Just old stuff from an age long gone....

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PawBear

 Cell phone plus Vonage, etc.= no landline

*** "Either we conform the Truth to our desires or we conform our desires to the Truth." ***

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