Spore DRM Saga Continues, EA Gets Sued

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schneider1492

the point is that a person can buy this game and install it and another program is secretly installed on your computer Without your knowledge or willingness that: can not be removed without a format/restore ( witch can cause problems with activations of other legitimately purchased programs), uses system resources (even while not playing the game), can hamper or disrupt other legitimate functions of a computer, damage hardware, corrupt files, open doors for other unwanted software.

remember rootkits where invented by sony as a drm device, spyware programs by other companies can now use it to make themselves undetectable and take whatever they want from you including credit card numbers, ss#, license#. people have lost there whole lives to drm!

drm dose not hamper people that steal or pirate software, it can easely be removed from the disk before installation and spread over the internet, it hampers people that actualy buy the software.

in the case of sony's rootkits you dident even have to install or agree to anything, just put the disk in your computer to listen to the music and it installed itself, it caused the drive to not work properly when a music disk was insertd. sony lost a bundle in court on that one!

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AkuPenguin

I'm sorry if I upset anyone, but I just don't see what the problem is here. The install limit for Spore is five computers. How many times does the average person actually need to install a game? And if DRM is so easy to bypass, then why the hell is everyone chewing heads over it? Do you buy a game to play it? Or do you buy a game to analyze its copy protection in hopes of finding some flaw so that you may copy that game and distribute it illegally? I agree with Humpfester; when you click 'yes' on the EULA, you're agreeing to their terms. Unless someone manages to find something about the game that in some way hurts them and wasn't mention in the license agreement, they're fighting a pointless and losing battle. Personally, the only problem I have with Spore is having to babysit my homeworld in the space stage.

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compro01

Problem 1 : Unless EA is going to run their servers forever, at some point (next week? next year?) EA can arbitrarily prevent you from using the game you purchased without recourse.

Problem 2 : In the US, bypassing that DRM is illegal under the DMCA

Problem 3 : To play the game, but see 1.

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Humpfester

When she clicked I Agree to the EULA, case closed. If I had a nickel for everytime I read I'm gonna sue EA in their forums, rotffal.

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compro01

Just because you agreed to a "contract" (whether or not a EULA is really a contract is up for debate) does not mean that contract is legally valid.

Also, securerom does not remove itself when you uninstall the game, which one could reasonably interpret as the termination of the agreement. From a quick read of their EULA, it does not at any point mention that the "technical protection measures" software will remain on the system after the game is uninstalled, so even if the EULA is valid, their ass is still hanging in the breeze.

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ghot

When will congress pass a law allowing "mob violence" against software vendors.....I say its way past time :) EA shouldn't be sued...thats petty cash to them....they should be beat to a pulp by about 200,000 construction workers, who haven't had their lunch yet.....it isn't just EA either.....Sony did it, Blizzard does it, Steam does it....they all use different methods...some more illegal than others...but they all do it....I say its past time to break out the ugly sticks...fines don't seem to be getting the message across.....whats next a DRM scheme that electrocutes software pirates...where does it stop? Do we still HAVE a Congress and why dont they step in and say....ok thats enough....you make enough money as it is...the relatively small amount of pirating that goes on is the "cost" of mass distribution. Charge $5.00 more for the software...whatever....smoking someones computer is NOT the solution.....rootkits, keyloggers, screenloggers, etc. are NOT the solution....they not only DON'T stop the piracy they give hackers ideas on how to IMPROVE their methods....this whole industry is gonna come crashing down...if some legislative body doesn't make a set of rules and enforce them. Whats next DRM for car engines......no I'm terribly sorry, but you just can't use high octane gas! That would be "pirating" engine efficiency.

At least watching the software industry and thier ridiculous ideas is a form of amusement for me, anyways.

 

I think we need to get back to a CD key form of protection ...that actually ...works...I don't have any idea what it could be.....but I'm sure some $250K/year programmer can figure one out that doesn't involve rootkits, loggers, kernel hooks (that can't be uninstalled...EVER)....Im kinda glad I'm gettin old...I truly do NOT want to be on the internet or gaming when it gets ....worse...and it will get much worse before it gets better....

 

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NAYRhyno

I thought spored = spore+bored of this DRM crap...

In other news, DRM = giant black hole for game developers.  Game companies should be the ones suing here, sueing the DRM companies for creating a product that doesn't do what it was advertised to, and creates massive headaches for their legit consumers.  SECURom is the biggest swindler in the history of gaming.  Think of the loads of money they make, for selling EA and others a product that simply doesn't work to do what it is advertised to (prevent piracy).

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MrNaPaLm32

Sony's DRM has been used in the past and created security holes because of its low-level integration on the OS. While this was with music CD's, the concept still stands. If holes in securom are created(which undoubtedly there will be eventually) the DRM allows the security hole to deliver malware deep into the OS.

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sirphunkee

LOL I just saw the story tag "spored"

That will be the new verb for "becoming a victim of unwanted software installation"

as in "Man I only had my new PC online for 10 minutes before I got totally spored"

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Khaled

The EA DRM and downloader are very annoying, I am usually behind a Firewall but Steam and WOW works just fine, only EA's phoning home apps are not working, preventing me from even trying the Red Alert 3 Beta!

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sirphunkee

The problem with the arguments by the class in the suit is that most of them are easily refutable (secuROM can be uninstalled w/an uninstaller from their site, it doesn't take control of your pc in the ways they claim).  This weakens their case, and takes away from the real issue of it not being clear what was getting installed (the EULA just says DRM will be installed, but doesn't name secuROM specifically)

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Strongbad536

well im almost about to go out and buy a legit copy of the game so that if this person wins (hey, I can dream cant i?) I would get 5 million, think of the dream machine I could build with that!!!

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ferds7

The 5 million is split amongst everyone. So if they've sold 1 million copies, you maybe get $5.

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TheZomb

This is more to cause a small dent in their bottom line than recompense for everyone involved

 

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avanish11

It's about time, is all I have to say.

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