Should Intel Buy SandForce?

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maxhax

If Intel acquires SandForce, what will happen to SF controller licensees?  Even if SF is obligated to provide it's controllers to other companies, Intel will surely be one step ahead.  The only consumer SSD maker that would be able to hold its own is Micron (and other Marvell users).  I'm not saying that this would destroy competition necessarily but it will more than likely wipe out current SF-based manufacturers.

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Nimrod

GUYS ITS ALL OVER THIS DEBATE IS OVER. I HAVE DECIDED TO BUY SAND FORCE FOR MY SURF SHOP ON THE BIG ISLAND. NO MORE FOR INTEL OR OCZ I BEAT THEM ALL TO THE PUNCH

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aarcane

I'm torn.  From intel's point of view, they obviously SHOULD buy the competition out.  However, as a consumer, I definately want to see more high performance SSD controllers emerge.  How's the best way for that to happen?  I could see the competition leading to great strides, yet at the same time we could all benefit greatly from a collaboration between the two greatest mind-groups in SSD Controller technology (Intel's awsome team + SandForce's awsome team).

I think the ideal solution would be for intel to sell their SSD Controller sub-unit to SandForce in exchange for a paltry chunk of change and a premium pricing contract for some odd years.  It would continue to foster innovation and competition while not giving too much power to intel and still result in an awsome gain for them.

Of course, I have no say in the process, so something stupid will probably happen.

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vrmlbasic

As an AMD fan, I'd say no.  Vertical integration is great for a business, but I don't want to see Intel become the dominant player in yet another field as I believe that they are liable to remain complacent and let innovation fall by the wayside when they're on top. Intel wasn't improving its integrated graphics by any measure until AMD upped the ante.

I also wouldn't put it past Intel to obfuscate usage of their controller for other vendors, as they did with Nvidia and the Ion chipset. 

Intel strong-arms the industry; I don't want them to have any more force to bring to bear.

(Again as an AMD fan, as an American should be.  After all, what American doesn't like the underdog? ;)

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DDRDiesel

In contrast to your arguement, I'm all for Intel acquiring SandForce.  I think it will be great for competition in the SSD sector, and might lead to some innovations later down the road with Intel chipsets and motherboards.

In addition, they didn't need to upgrade their onboard graphics until AMD came along because, well, who doesn't want to be on top?  Once AMD decided to grow some onboard juevos, the competition between the two got fierce, meaning us users could only profit from the remains.

I'm an American, and I cheer for Intel

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vrmlbasic

I don't see how Intel having what is considered the best SSD controller in its pocket furthers competition in the SSD arena.  You mention that Intel _might_ innovate, somehow, if they have SandForce yet it will only be on Intel boards.  Somehow I don't think that will further competition.

 

Everyone wants to be on top, but once there no one should sit and twiddle their thumbs until they see someone else start to crest the hill. The mountain of progress is rife with false summits, but Intel won't try to climb to the next one up under their own initiative.  That's what irks me about them; technology could be further ahead, but Intel is content to constrain it for its own purposes.  AMD and ARM are spurring them on to progress, while providing their own divergent technological breakthroughs, which is why I root for AMD. The underdog always tries to further himself, the big dog just loafs about and grows fat.

(So many banal metaphors, so little time ;)

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poee

You don't see Intel's continued adherence to Moore's Law and their constant improvement in semiconductor process technology -- years ahead of anyone else -- as a sign that they do, indeed, move forward up the hill to the next "summit" on their own initiative? Dragging the rest of the industry along with them?

http://www.afterdawn.com/news/article.cfm/2011/06/26/intel_s_commitment_to_exascale_computing_by_2018_new_process_technology

http://www.bit-tech.net/news/hardware/2010/10/20/intel-invests-in-22nm-fabs/1

http://www.anandtech.com/show/4345/intels-2011-investor-meeting-intels-architecture-group-14nm-airmont-atom-in-2014

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