SecuROM DRM Reaches Space Phase, Decides to Conquer Far Cry 2

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Quakindude

Unless SecuRom has changed since Bioshock, it installs without your consent or knoweledge unless you actually read the box or know about it before hand. You cannot uninstall SecuRom. Even if you uninstall the game, SecuRom is still on your computer.

I'm not opposed to a working, unintrusive DRM scheme. But SecuRom simply isn't it. I will back up my complaints with my wallet. I will not buy a game with this crapware included in it.

If I get to wanting to play it too badly, I may buy the game and then download a crack for it. I won't outright steal the game, but I don't want SecuRom on my friggin computer.

When you have folks like me considering cracks or using a totally seperate HDD to install the game to protect your personal info on your main drive from potentially damaging crapware, you've scored an ultimate fail.

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Pixelated

Even if you buy the game and download a crack InSecuROM is STILL installed. It's not like Tages or StarForce where it's installed upon first run of the executable. I remember downloading a crack for Brothers In Arms Earned In Blood because of the SatrForce protection. As long as I didn't run the game first it wouldn't install. InSecuROM installs itself regardless even in demos!

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nekollx

True story

 

I have a PC laptop, my friend a Macbook. I have a unopened Spore Creature Creator CD. When my friend came over he saw it and noticed it worked for Windows and Mac. I mentioned Securerom and he droped the box like he was a vampire holding a holy cross.

 

That how much users hate SecureTrojen

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nekollx

the correct term is EPIC FAIL

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Justsayno

I'm surprised to be saying this but while I was very keen to buy FarCry 2 this article on the DRM that has been included in the game has put me off buying it. I'm even tempted to wait till until someone cracks the game so that I can download it without all the activation restrictions. Even if the restrictions never have a noticable effect on me its the thought that they may, that gets my goat.

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Mayhemm

Ok, I'm probably not saying anything new, but I'm going to chime in anyway.

 Publishers/Distributers have several misconceptions about piracy:

1)  They assume that every copy of a game downloaded is a lost
sale.  Not true.  While some pirates may have otherwise purchased the
game, many are simply pirates and would look for other games to
download if product "X" was not readily available.  The real trick is
to weigh the number of piracies prevented by DRM against the number of
paying customers driven off.  Typically, the results aren't favorable.

2)  PC gaming is the sole realm of pirates.  Not true.  While cracked
console games are marginally harder to get working, they are just as
simple to download. If PC gaming dries up, pirates will not go away. 
They'll simply turn all their attention on consoles.

 Manufacturers assume a percentage of their product will be duds.  Retailers assume a certain amount of shoplifting will take place.  Now publishers/distributers will have to accept that a certain amount of their games will be pirated.  No matter what.

 P.S.  Lines and paragraphs do not break automatically!

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atomaweapon

I know it sounds cliche to say, but I was actually 'this' close to buying Far Cry 2. I've been following  it for awhile and really started to like it's direction. I read the 8.9 ign review and went to amazon to check the price. 50 bucks. Not too bad, was considering waiting till it go to about 40, but was close to a purchase. Then lo and behold a post on the discussion about how it will use the 3 strikes activation. That sealed the deal and clicked on the "close" button.

To any company that takes the time out to see what their PAYING customers are saying, I will NOT purchase a product that has "activation" as it's DRM method. A CD check is fine to prevent casual copying, but this ridiculous limitations on software I legally PURCHASE just doesn't cut it.

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urdead4g

 

  I'm totaly against this whole DRM fiasco. I don't pirate games and have "matured" enough to realize if you don't pay for any games, don't come crying if there isn't anymore exclusively for PC. The responsability is in the gamers hands. With that in mind, I vote with my wallet.

   Since a nice little DRM is being slapped on Far Cry 2, i'll just get another good game from a company who "understands" that putting some extra DRM doesn't matter that much. It mostly affects the gamers who buy the games in the first place.

  Looks like i'll be getting Left 4 Dead after all.

Kev.

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knexkid

The number of installations thing doesn't bother me too much, as long
as they release the restriction down the road.  I believe that is what
they did in Bioshock.  Initially they had only a few installs per CD
key, but down the road when the game had "come and gone" they took off
that restriction.  I can live with only three installs for my key, but
I expect that limit to be released within 1-2 year(s).  That way when
I'm old and need a trip down memory lane, I can play my game without
having to worry about how many times I have already installed the game
back in the day of its prime time.

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jcollins

In this day and age of timesink MMO's, I think it is crazy for companies to find more ways of encouraging people NOT to buy their product.   Their customers have X amount of time for entertainment.  Time is their most important commodity.  Companies are all vying for a chunk of that time.  In terms of selling, you are hyping up your product's good points as much as you can in order to show the consumer why they should spend their money/time with the game.  You don't ever want to emphasize the downsides. 

A good example is Spore.  I can look at the latest hype, think it is pretty cool, get excited by creature creator and whatnot.  Edge of the seat waiting for the release sort of situations.  Then get slammed with the cold water of DRM, having to beg mommy for activations because something that might be out of my control.   It may never happen, but why should I take the chance?  Then I decide enh, maybe I won't buy it when it releases, I'll wait for the reviews to see if it really is worth the hassle while I am levelling up my character in the MMO.  Then the reviews come in and the game's not the next coming, it's actually very simplistic with no meat.  Then I go back to World of Warcraft, Age of Conan, City of Heroes/Villains, Warhammer Online, etc. and spend my hours there instead.

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Morpheous416

"Only now....at the end, do you understand."

 

I am particularly pleased that SecuRom is allowing us to upgrade our PCs as many times as we want!!

Didn't know I needed special permission from them, but Thank You!

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Shalbatana

 You know the only thing that really keeps people from widespread copying of games on a console is the Hardware specific construction. To dupe games on consoles usually takes not only copying the disc, but installing some sort of hard to get hacked chip to play them. Pirating then becomes all but cost prohibitive at that point.

As much as I hate them for fear of losing them. Dongles certainly solve this problem on the PC by providing a hardware link to the software.

I'm not necessarily recommending this is the way to go for games exactly, as it would become annoying to keep track of a dongle for every game, but perhaps it's an approach that should be looked at, and could evolve into something workable. I'd have no problem plugging in a SINGLE dongle that let me play ALL my games, that could be updated when a new game was bought, and afforded me a way to recreate it if I lost it. The trick is how to implement it. Especially if it brings PC gaming back to the forefront for creators.

_______________________________

"There's no time like the future."

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knexkid

I think that is a rather clever idea but I could almost garuntee that hackers/piraters would find a way to emulate that dongle.  With the PC being such an open ended platform, it would not surprise me if they could fool the computer into thinking that the hardware was attached, when it really isn't.  Just look at disk emulation...

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Shalbatana

  Hmm.. disc emulation didn't occur to me, however it has yet to help
anyone pirate the editing software I use which requires a dongle.

 

I still think there's something there, but it would take a bit of susshing (did I just use that word?) out.

Again though, would you need to pirate a game that you could already download, install and play anywhere... other than to give it to someone else to play when you're not there, and would it be economically feasable?

 Not sure. Lets see what that (insert name I can't remember here) software company (who posted the bill of rights comes up with.

_______________________________

"There's no time like the future."

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Tekzel

I have been waiting for EA to wise up and get rid of the draconian DRM crap they want to use, but I guess it isn't going to happen.  So screw them, while I buy games from Steam that don't include 3rd party DRM, I am just going to go pirate Crysis and FarCry 2.  I gave them plenty of time to be reasonable.  They brought it upon themselves.

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Tenhawk

What's the net effect of DRM? It's an inconveniance to paying customers. That's it. That's all. If your bank made you jump through hoops, giving ID, taking photos, passing screening devices, etc in order to prevent bank robbery, and the robbers just walked past all the security with guns in their hands, would you thank the bank for the extra 'security'?

Farcry 2 is already available for download in a pirated Xbox version. I don't own an XBox, and I'm unlikely to ever own an Xbox, but if I can go download the console version that easily why are they beefing up PC security again?? DRM does not work, has never worked, and will not work any time in the forseeable future. it's not a question of morality... people who will pirate, WILL PIRATE.

Why is this so hard for companies to understand? They're spending millions on security that doesn't work, jacking up prices of their games to drive away paying customers, and then blame it on US when sales and profits go down?? I'll give them a hint. Save the millions spent on piracy, release a game sans DRM... or at most just simple DRM to dissuade kids from using Nero or whatever came with their PC to make copies for all their friends, and sell the game at a reasonable price. It's a no brainer. Sales will go up, costs will go down, and pirates? Pirates will STAY THE SAME.

Pirates are part of the biz, you dopes. They have been since Gutenberg invented the printing press. Media has always been pirated, and will always be pirated. If you don't want to deal with pirates, try another line of work, like the Navy. And yes, piracy is more widespread today as the internet makes communication easier... so WHAT!? SO is your Audience. Twenty years ago there was no way you could reach the same scale of audience as today. Fifty years ago you would have had to make do with a few tens of thousands. The scale of piracy has climbed along with the scale of your markets. The only thing driving down the profits of media companies ARE the media companies.

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Spendrik

I dislike DRM, but from a business point of view - I can understand why DRM is seen as a necessary response to the piracy problem. Not the ideal response, but a response nonetheless.

Unfortunately, for many consumers, it seems they've gotten the chicken and the egg mixed up. Some seem to think that piracy is justified *because* of DRM.

I'm not sure what is worse: suits thinking that DRM will help sales, or 'consumers' pirating games, DRM or no DRM.

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jcollins

The thing companies seem to forget is simple psychology.  If you are going to treat an innocent person (their consumers) like criminals, they'll start acting like criminals since if they're going to be penalized for something, they might as well do it and be penalized for a reason.

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spideyman

Personally, I hate DRM but it has become something I have grown accostumed to. My problem lies when DRM screws a game up to where it is unplayable. I bought Bioshock when it first came out, installed it and had problems after playing about 15 minutes or so. It kept crashing to the desktop. I contacted 2K games who offered no working solutions. Finally in frustration, I searched for and downloadad a 'crack' for the game. Low and behold, I was able to play the game past that point and finish the game with no further problems. If DRM doesn't affect gameplay, I have no problems at all with it as the companies are just trying to protect their property.

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jrocknyc

i guess the answer is to get the version that won't have DRM. :p

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guest001

Does anyone know if you buy this game off steam will the securom still be on there? or is steam's "drm" enough?

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Tekzel

It is still there in all it's shining glory.  On the "info panel" to the right of the game description, if you look near the bottom, you will see the game limitations are listed, 3rd party DRM and limited activations.

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Digital-Storm

Ya know what? If the game is good, I will buy it, if it sucks, im not gonna buy it. End of story.

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jcollins

What if it is good but leaves your system open to hacks and other malware later (ala the Sony Rootkit)?

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samduhman

Ya same as me. I'll take "acceptable" DRM over no game at all. If PC gamers keep boycotting "all" DRM then say goodbye to PC games. Yes we love to hate EA but honestly you do want to buy some of thier games don't you. ;P

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Muerte

You forget. EA is only a distributor.  If the designers want to put out a game, they do not really need to  go through EA.  There is still way too much money in PC gaming for people to just walk away.  I don't know what Ubisoft's deal is.  They can see that this issue is going to cost them sales but want to run down that path anyways.  Oh well so be it there will always be other games.

Sins of a Solar Empire did quite well, for its genre, without much of any DRM.  Basically if you want to play over the internet you have to have a proper key.  On a LAN you only need one copy to set everyone up who wants to play.  This IMO is a very reasonable way of doing things.

The other thing is I've not been able tofind enough on Securom to make me comfortable with it.

Which sux because I was really looking forward to Farcry2.

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Tekzel

I DO want to buy some of their games.  The problem is, they won't let me.  Since I refuse to let invasive malware DRM to install on my machine, just as I refuse to allow spyware and adware on my machine, I can't install it.  I refuse to buy a game I can't play.

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Brendan

What I hate ist that you have to uninstall the game in order to revoke your license. Whenever I reinstall XP, I never uninstall any games. This would be a major hassle to uninstall all games each time, if they would all use SecuROM, in order to revoke their licenses.

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urdead4g

 That's so true, i didn't even think about that. i was actually maybe considering buying it since i buy my pc games in the first place, Maybe i could get it with a drm that gives you back your activation after i uninstall it, but you brought up a very good point. generally if im uninstalling XP, Who says i'll be lucky enough to even go and uninstall the game in the first place? good point, thx.

 

Kev.

 

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ferds7

First, I disagree 100% that DRM is not a good solution to piracy and that not wasting money and time on DRM technologies and putting the saved money into lower priced games is by far a better solution.

Though, I must say that if it works as stated above it doesn't seem to be all that bad. Maybe I am missing something and if so please let me know.

What I understand is that you can buy a copy and install it on 3 pcs.  That means you could buy it and if you have 2 friends who are not sick of you always wanting to shoot them or blow their virtual heads off, then they could each chip in 1/3 of the price and you've got a pretty cheap game for the 3 of you to play.When you uninstall the game if it works like it is suppose to, you don't lose the activation so you can just re-activate it as many times as possible.

Back in the days of the original couple of Ages of Empires, I would have been quite fond of this type of feature. 10 boxed games could equal a LAN party for 30 people. I wish professional software was this nice :(

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Velcrow

I doubt you'll find any friends on this site with that attitude. heh.

In any case, just because you can install the game on 3 computers does NOT mean you can play them online at the same time. LAN party? Probably. Given their current path they'll probably block that soon enough too. Then you'll be bitchin'. LOL. But don't expect your friends to be gunning beside you in the online arena at all.

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maniacm0nk3y

"Watch sales drop %50". Not really but wtf. DRM is pointless. Didn't they get the message when music wasn't doing well? Lessons are never learned.

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knexkid

Will this make a lot of people upset (just like Spore)...sure it will.  I believe that DRM really has no solution (at least not in the forseeable future).  No matter how much work is put into the DRM, pirates will crack it in no time.  People who pay for the game have to deal with the hassle of activation, deactivation...or "revoking", etc while pirates don't have to worry about a thing.  Obviosly this is wrong and that is a big reason we can no longer see our PC Exculsives, which hurt us all.  Is it better to go the Stardock way with no DRM at all?  Or should we pull an EA and limit a product you have purchased?  It is these questions that prevent a solution to this problem.

 Edit: Also the hasle of activation hurts those of us stuck with dialup (Thank God for satellite, but I used to be stuck with dial-up).  Bioshock was a pain for me because it forced me to update it before it would fully install (I bought the game in the day I still had dialup).  Same goes for the Valve games, which is plain wrong.  

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dankers

dude i totally agree
lets say you buy a car and you can only start her up after you call honda and have them put in an override
makes no sense right???
bioshock, mass effect, spore all the games with drm have been cracked winthin days or weeks of their release (okay mass effect took a while for one that worked flawlessly)

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