Rumor: HP Ditching Windows RT Tablet Plans Due To Microsoft Surface, Others May Follow

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Keith E. Whisman

Hello all!!!
$85 dollars isn't much more than the $60 Google charges for Licensing Android OS and Windows is a far more capable OS. So all these companies are dropping out because they are going to have to charge a $25 dollar premium over competitive Android tablets. I think the $25 dollar premium will be worth it if Windows Tablets can bring more mainstream apps to the table than either Ipad or Android Tablets can. Windows tablets bring something nothing else can, a seamless transition of your desktop apps to your tablet. They will all be the same programs and you can work on the same projects. I imagine executives playing FreeCell on the subway to their office and when they get to their office to do nothing all day, they can finish their game of FreeCell on their office Windows Desktop.

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ShyLinuxGuy

OEMs are smart to ditch or Windows RT. They'll spend $90 on the license, which in all probability will cost more than anything else contained in the device. I think the high license fee is to offset Microsoft's R&D costs for the development of Windows 8 RT. Windows 8 isn't too much different under the hood from the previous OS, Windows 7, so R&D costs are much lower because they didn't start from the ground up with the x86 version like they had to with Windows RT (ARM).

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Scapegoat

I'm not convinced the $90s price tag for RT will kill hardware OEMs' appetite for RT tablets, but I do think Microsoft would be better off focusing on making these companies meet standards so that their tablet experience will be good. I hope they are as strict as their hardware standards are for windows phones. It's made for a pretty damn consistent experience on those phones so far.

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maxeeemum

ROTFLMAO

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BryceBooth

With regards to the $90 OS tax, Microsoft is the company who developed the software, they've already invested in their own product. Perhaps it's time that these OEM's either innovate, or stop complaining about the software which has made them wealthy.

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GenMasterB

Wow.. You not only drank Microsoft's KoolAid, I think you helped make it.. You have no clue.. either that or you're still stuck in the 80's & 90's.. Have you seen other OS's licensing fees? And you dare take up for this greedy money machine that could care less about you?
I've supported M$ as a dealer and a VAR for almost 30 yrs and sold 1000's of copies of Windows AND Win Servers.. Ask me if M$ has ever gone out of their way to acknowledge me or even so much as thrown me a copy of a single copy of Windows? or even at a discount!?.. no..
Using a Biblical term, but you reap what you sow.. This is BOUND to bite them in the ass.. Serves them right.. if they're asking 90 for RT to OEM's and have no damned software for it (its not the x86), then they're smoking something they should pass or wake the hell up and see what they're doing to both themselves and their OEMs and Customers.. for shame.. even a nut can see problems here..

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BryceBooth

I am just simply stating that they have every right to charge what they see fit for their product, in a business sense, it's perfectly acceptable. As for a discount, you will find that OEM copies of Windows are significantly priced lower than their retail counterparts.
Perhaps I am nuts, it just seems silly to give away the fruits of your labour for nothing, only for other people to prosper from it. We all love free stuff, but we should never expect it.

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Keith E. Whisman

Android charges a $60 dollar tax, why aren't you bitching about that? It's an opensource OS and most Opensource OS's are free to download and use. $85 minus $60 is an exorbitant $25 dollars difference that nobody on Earth can afford. $25 bucks, the world is going to come to an end. Why don't you drink the kool-ade. $25 bucks isn't much at all if Windows Tablets take off and steal the market.

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Scapegoat

GenMasterB:

I think that's a bit harsh. While it's understandably easy to toss rage in Microsoft's direction on occasion, I think they do have to make their profits. To be honest, I kind of agree, $90 seems awful steep for a RT tablet maker to take on as a cost of the tablet, and will affect the consumer price on the other end in a bad way. Maybe this will damage the success of RT, or maybe not. It's really hard to tell now, since there's a lot that depends on that success. I think half that, or even less, would be great if Microsoft was really serious about gaining ground on market saturation.

BryceBooth:

I definitely agree with you as well, hardware developers need to shape up and actually care about the designs and experience they are selling, in my opinion. Hopefully Surface will encourage these companies to do so. In fact, I think it's sad that Microsoft in one attempt has already created a better tablet for Windows that past lackluster tablets (assuming that Surface isn't plagued with quality control, software bug issues). Talk about a way to humiliate hardware companies by showing how much they HAVEN'T tried.

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Stormfuror

We all know HP isn't gonna stop shipping Windows with their crappy PC's and Laptops! So, Microsoft still wins.

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Straegen

Been saying it for a long time now, how does a company that sells their OS compete with companies that give it away (Apple to sell hardware and Google to sell searches)? If they loss leader it like the XBox that still pisses off Dell, HP, etc which are Microsofts current cash cows.

I think they do it not with RT but with Pro essentially putting a laptop in a tablet form factor. Eventually the hardware will catch up and they can unify on one Windows platform across all devices.

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Scapegoat

I think this is a great point. IF Microsoft delved into the hardware business the proper way, it could be seriously beneficial in terms of user experience and profits.

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aarcane

I think this is a case of one hand and the other not knowing each other's actions. While one team was topside poking their noses into OEM's business, another was buried in a bunker doing what they felt best. I think it's backfired so hilariously.
Ultimately, Microsoft's high pricing will be the end of them, but for now I'm just glad to see them tripping their selves up with such hijynx.

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Scapegoat

I respect your position, but I don't think that's quite so. Apple users have been willing to fork out surprising amounts of money for hardware, in some cases even with mediocre year-to-year updrades. I think it's a little too soon to call this a lack of planning on Microsoft's part.

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bling581

"Apple users have been willing to fork out surprising amounts of money for hardware"

The Apple flock is of a different "sort", so I don't think you'll see such a following from the rest of us.

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Scapegoat

I think you guys are missing the point a little bit. Microsoft has never really been a serious hardware maker, except for the XBOX, which was solely for the purpose of driving a platform, not for the profit of that hardware.

I believe this is the same thing going on here. a couple of articles on the net, including one from Tested.com notes that windows tablets (and tablets in general) have been kind of half-assed. All feebly aspire to be like the iPad, but cheaper. I think that's not a very worthy goal, most especially for tablets that are meant for entirely different platforms.

Whether you like Windows 8 and RT or not, this is Microsoft trying to make the other hardware companies actually create something that's not "like the iPad". If Microsoft, who is ultimately not a hardware company, can create something this high-quality and stands on its own in terms of tablet innovation, what can other companies who DEDICATE all of their R&D to hardware do? Theoretically, even better.

The fact that HP is shy on this, well, that could be for a number of reasons. It's pretty obvious HP hasn't been very dedicated to the hardware business recently. It's already tried to exit once. They're also more strongly suited to building cheap stuff. The touchpad was its own phenomenon, as the firesale was really only due to the fumblings of a CEO.

So, what does this mean? True quality and innovative R&D for tablets comes from dedication on every level. I think Microsoft is just raising their standards for hardware vendors, something that, arguably, Micrisoft has needed to do for years.

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aarcane

HP's made cheap disposable crap for years now. I wish they would exit the market.
As for their silence, there's probably some tiny clause in their contract somewhere that prevents them from telling the truth as they see it.

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Brad Chacos

Excellent feedback. You're saying the Surface is likely Google Nexus-esque "reference" hardware rather than a serious stab at cracking into the hardware market, then?

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Scapegoat

Perhaps. In honesty, I'm not entirely convinced with either of those two ideas. I think to choose one is to kind of ignore the other signs of how this could benefit the Windows/tablet community, developers, and users.

I think the Surface has a distinct multi-faceted advantage for Microsoft:

- Provides an appealing, competitive and compelling hardware for Windows 8 launch.

- Sets a high bar for hardware standards for Windows 8 tablets, and can stoke a fire of competition, enthusiasm, and development for hardware makers.

- (Potentially) Introduces the Windows 8 tablet experience with a high-quality, consistent, and high-performance experience

- Sets Windows 8 and RT apart from Android and the iOS platform

- Gives Microsoft a "foot in the door" so to speak, in case other tablet developers just don't cut it in terms of tablet development.

Let's face it, Microsoft is playing a gamble with Windows 8. However, the more I read about their ballsy design and efforts to unify a desktop/tablet/phone experience, the more I find it appealing, and quite frankly, the less of a gamble it actually seems.

To be fair, we have yet to see how the final version of Windows 8 will play in real world use, and Windows Phone 8 is only announced, so we don't have a whole lot of tangible evidence as to how the bigger picture of the Windows experience will be.

Regardless, I think Microsoft's move into the hardware for Surface is more for the all-around benefits that I mentioned that will make up the larger at home and mobile experience.

It really makes me wonder: Microsoft hasn't been the best in the phone market, tablet market, and has arguably been losing ground on Windows-based PCs. They could just be the first to get the unified multi-device experience right.

If not, it looks like they are well armed to get a lot closer to it than any other company right now.

Does that make sense?

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whr4usa

well thought and said scapegoat

took all of my thoughts out of my brain and more but with better words and less technicality than to what I'm prone haha

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Morete

Well, IBM...here's your chance of a lifetime. Just think...what a better opportunity to build a beautiful closed source OS (OS3xx perhaps?). Microsoft would hate it. OEMs and PC users would love it. Come on IBM. You know you want to! :p

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damicatz

Windows RT will be as successful as Windows Phone 7 was. That is to say, it won't be successful.

What is the point of buying Windows if you can't have actual windows and you can't run Windows programs?

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Supall

This is one way to knock out the competition. Still, Microsoft's implementation still has room for tablet makers. On the RT side, yeah, it doesn't make a whole lot of sense. But if these PC makers decide to implement cheaper versions of the Surface Pro (possibly utilizing AMD APU's instead), they could still compete. There is still a market between the RT and Pro prices.

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loozer

Actually, I think HP learned from touchpad, and doesn't want to take a big hit on another ARM tablet firesale. Windows RT was way too much in common with the touchpad, and other failed tablets..

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RaptorJohnson

Well played, Microsoft, well played.

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