Raspberry Pi Starts Flying Out of Factories, Now Available For General and Multiple Orders

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ama789

my roomate's aunt makes $83/hr on the laptop. She has been without work for 8 months but last month her pay was $8682 just working on the laptop for a few hours. Read more on this site...NuttyRich.com

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John Pombrio

Kind of reminds me of that cheap and tiny Sinclair Z80 computer I bought back in the early eighties. Yes, it did things but never have the right ooph to DO much with it and needed a bunch of stuff just to turn it on. That was a fun but SHORT use curve.
97% of the Raspberry Pis will be sitting in junk drawers or on the computer desk getting dusty within three months of purchase. The Pi will be bought by tens of thousands, , partially used by thousands, actually used by hundreds, and geeked out by a few dozen people who will be the ONLY ones reported upon and plastered all over the internet.
Brad, you bought one, right? Done anything with it? Booted it up? Downloaded code? Tried networking? Streaming? Remote piloted drones? Anything? Or is it still sitting there getting fondly handled with dreams of the things it will do in the nebulous future?

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crazybigdan

Man, I hear what you're saying, but do you have to paint such a grim picture?
Think of it like LEGOs. Some never open the box. Some open it and scatter the pieces everywhere. Some open it and just follow directions and set the completed model on a shelf (or play with it occasionally). And then some go crazy and bring dreams to life. Granted, LEGOs and pi.s have different learning curves.

I guess I am just saying that the concept of people buying more than they can consume is not new, and is seen in all tech, not just the pi.

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John Pombrio

It's because of the lack of essential stuff to get it to work. Shipping a barebones board is like buying a motherboard. You have to root around to get all this other stuff in order to get it to DO SOMETHING. LEGOs comes with everything you need, the Pi, NOTHING you need. Yes, kludging around in the junk drawer can get you most of the things. I could come up with the stuff, but then what? You have to go and find an operating system online than load it into the SD card, then run and debug the code THEN load other software. At the end, what do you have? A cool looking LEGOs robot? no, a cheap media player. Big whoop.

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Strangelove_424

I don’t understand your bitter pessimism about the Raspberry Pi. It might remind you of a Sinclair Z80, but it’s more powerful than the IBM XT I learned how to compute on as a kid. I don’t think you are making fair comparisons. After all, neither an IBM XT (originally $3,000) nor your Z80 (originally $155) could ever run Quake 3 at 1080P, let alone with usable frame rates, while Raspberry Pi can (for $35). “…sitting in junk drawers or on the computer desk getting dusty within three months of purchase” can describe any tech purchase if the person buying the device doesn’t have the creativity, desire, or curiosity to use it. I’ve seen the same thing happen to full-blown desktop computers in the wrong hands. Ultimately, a computer (no matter how big or fast) is just a tool, and it’s in the hands of users to decide how that tool will be implemented in their daily life. I see plenty of friends with fancy Dell laptops that only use it for Facebook/Farmville. But I don’t see you railing about that. So why attack a humble, honest effort on the part of charity researchers to bring a powerful, low-power, and cheap set of computing tools to everyone in the world? As far as uses, there's plenty to do with it:
- Baby monitor/remote camera system: With the release of the 5MP camera module this will make an awesome, network-capable camera system.
- Small, cheap, low-power media player: This has enormous benefits that shouldn’t be downplayed. I plan to stream music for my dog while I’m away, and maybe doggie television (they have that now). I sure as hell don’t want to be running my main OCed computer hour after hour just to keep my dog from feeling lonely, so this fits the bill nicely. If you own a retail store, this would be great for streaming ambient music.
- Overclocking: Yes, it’s possible. You can overclock these babies to 1Ghz (850Mhz if you don’t want to overvolt) http://fusionstrike.com/2012/overclock-raspberry-pi-cpu-850mhz-ram-500mhz
- Infinite amounts of hardware control configurations, especially if using a breakout board. You mentioned controlling drones, but I can imagine other uses like controlling bedroom lighting or running a miniature train setup or something. Complicated practical jokes come to mind as well.
- Spreading the tech gospel: Everyone I talk to about Raspberry Pi gets excited about it, even people who aren’t into computers much. After seeing one themselves, if that excitement is enough to convince them that building their own computer could be fun, all the better.
- Changing the world: With your pessimistic point of view, you’re probably going to scoff at and dismiss this one but it’s the damn truth. There has never been a $35 computer before, and this thing is bound to be revolutionary. I told a friend about it recently and she asked for a link to pass on to someone working in the Peace Corp, whose job the last 3 years has been to introduce technology to impoverished nations in Central America. Sure, the Raspberry Pi doesn’t look too hot to someone who already has an quad core, GTX 5XX or 6XX card, TBs of storage, massive RAM, etc…. but what about a kid whose never been on the internet before, let alone done any programming? Or how about a Chinese human rights activist that wants to release pictures of Chinese human rights violations on the internet, but needs a disposable computer that can’t be traced? The ways in which Raspberry Pi can affect the world are infinite.

For its price and power consumption the Raspberry Pi is amazingly capable. Where that capability ends up is entirely in the hands of end users, teachers, and the hobbyist community in general. I believe it will make a positive impact on the world, not a negative one.

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jaseplase

excellent post

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Bustout

I just received mine. I thought it was slightly inconsiderate of them to ship it so that it arrived while I was at Comic-Con. I got home to find my package sitting on my doorstep with the shipping label completely blanched out by the sun. Who knows how long it's been sitting there. I can't even read the tracking number to look online. I hope that time in the sun didn't fry the circuits. :-P

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Strangelove_424

Checkout complete! That was the easiest $35 I’ve ever spent in my life! The 3 month wait is going to drive me nuts though. I’m really stoked about this. Going to start jimmy-rigging a case for it soon, out of a shoebox or soap container or something. Woohoo! I have a new build to work on!

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Jacobwt226

not really, admit-idly, you DO have to pay 50 once shipping kicks in, but who doesn't have some old SD card laying around?! a cell phone charger using mini USB? if you use a apple product your stuck paying, if you are android only, you get a nice extra for stocking up on 6 buck chargers! and Mythbuntu, can be used with a universal remote, and question, how did you type this message, oh right! with a mouse and keyboard! A USB hub is recommended, but either you have one, or you buy a 6 buck one. I do not agree with your media center view at all. BUT, I do agree there are also fun projects to be had with one too.

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Jacobwt226

Get it! there is no way to express how effective this is! plus, with Steam coming to Linux I can see Portal 2 being played on it (plus if you build the case out of Lego's you get to trick your friends 'hey guys, ten buck says i can makes a Lego computer!'!

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stradric

Don't be fooled. The RasPi is not a $35 PC. It doesn't come with storage. You have to buy an SD card. It doesn't come with a power supply. You have to buy a cell phone charger. It doesn't come with a mouse or a keyboard or wifi. And it only has 2 USB ports, so you're probably going to need a hub. When all is said and done, you might easily be up over $100.

That's not to say that it's bad. It's a fun toy that can open the door to some really cool projects. But if you want a media player for your TV, the RasPi is a very bad choice. After all, you can get a media player for your TV for like $75 that does 1080p and has an IR remote.

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silverblack

Okay, I already have a few SD cards, spare phone charger, several mice and keyboards, extra wi-fi adapter (would go ethernet anyways), usb hub...

So what you're saying is this will cost me $35.

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