Psst Microsoft, Windows 8 Users are Barely Touching Metro Apps

43

Comments

+ Add a Comment
avatar

riopato

How come every time Apple forces their users to use their products the way they say to and there is hardly a peek let alone customer out cry?
Is it because Windows users just hate change or are Apple users just adept to and embrace it? The concept of the start screen is no different to the concept of the Start menu (no it's not called Start Button. the start button doesn't do anything except give users access to the start menu).
Articles such as this is a sign that innovation is truly stifled by the masses and not by the engineers. They allow ignorance to guide themselves into oblivion instead of running towards new concepts in spite of fear. If users don't use apps on windows 8 then why would there be any need to develop apps for it?!? This concept hasn't effected Apple one bit because their user base learn and adapted.
Continue using 3rd party programs with archaic concepts and live in the dark. Evolution is for those who seek change and adapt. I personally hope programs like start 8 will eventually hose people's system when Windows 8.1 becomes available.

avatar

SWds07

Three points...
1)
John Pombrio had a good point. Apps for Windows 8 are mostly glorified web pages.
Isn't one of the points of HTML5 to create a unified, cross-platform, app-like experience in a web page?
We don't really need apps on the desktop. There are other ways to bridge the gap between tablet/phone and PC to sync data and settings without overhauling the entire interface.

2)
I am the head of IT at my company and have to evaluate new technologies for use in a corporate environment.
A very big concern is that if I were to deploy Windows 8 in my environment as it stands today, our productivity would plummet. We would have to purchase a Start8 or similar license for every PC in our environment just so that our employees could still use a layout/computing style that has worked for almost 2 decades.
I strongly believe that I would be fired/hung if I deployed Windows 8 without Start8 in our entire company. I really hope Microsoft doesn't try and push companies to Windows 8. As it stands now, they are playing pretty nice with those of us wanting to stay on 7.

3)
For the record, I am using Windows 8 right now. As an OS, it is pretty amazing. It is extremely fast and quite stable. There have been some compatibility issues but I have learned to work around them or use a VM to run the things I need. (This happens every time they update Windows so you really can't hate Windows 8 for that.)
I never use Metro and it kills me every time something tries to open in one of the new default apps (I will be changing them out). Windows 8 is really only usable (for business) with Start 8.

avatar

Sirius

And you call yourself the head of IT? Yet you have to use a crutch like Start8 to use Windows 8? *laughs*

Like everyone else that's bashed it, you have failed to prove it. Prove how you believe productivity will plummet?

avatar

SWds07

At the time I purchased the new machine with Windows 8, I installed Start 8 because my schedule was quite full and I didn't have the time to work with it. Since that time, I have become more versed in some of the Windows 8 functions and changes.
Regardless of if I need the 'crutch' or not, my personal preference is still the traditional Start menu. Perhaps for some, and certainly those with touch screens, it might make more sense.

In environments where your end users freak out when their keyboard batteries die or when they see a log in screen, changing the entire Windows interface (even if the underlying idea is the same) is a bad idea.
For a lot of our users, we are in the process of upgrading their Office from 2003 to 2010. Most of them freak when they see the Ribbon and have to spend their valuable time looking for a button that isn't necessarily where it makes sense to them. The change in the Start button/screen is the same principle. Once you get used to it and customize it to your liking, it probably isn't so bad but until you do, it will slow you down.

avatar

Camerone

Hypocrite Microsoft; they want to have a "unified interface", but their new Xbox1 OS is incompatible with Windows 8/RT.

GG

avatar

maxeeemum

Just like in Gordon's rant in the No BS Podcast #198 Apps are for Smartphones. This is really no surprise to me that Metro Apps are not being used. Most who made the mistake of buying Win8 or bought a new PC with it delete the apps and install Start8, StartMenu8, Classic Shell, etc. to kill Metro and restore the Start Button/Menu.

Of course the real purpose of Windows 8/Metro is to sell WP8 and tablets. So how's that plan working out Microsoft??? LOL!

http://www.maximumpc.com/article/no_bs_podcast/no_bs_podcast_198_simcity_debacle_xi3_piston_pricing_and_more

avatar

KuroZero

Recently (about a month) bought a touch screen win8 laptop and have installed a total of two metro/store apps - Skype and Evernote. Forgot about MPC having a win8 app so guess that'll be #3.

Was going to go with google docs as its mainly used for word and spreadsheet work away from home, but decided didn't want to bother with tethering my phone constantly or wireless dongle ($600, no built-in radio at that pricepoint) or hope for a wifi hotspot. Plus, esp for spreadsheets, I'm pretty partial to excel formulas, etc.

After just buying it, had to hit the road so didn't get a chance to install alot of apps. Remote desktop and dropbox handled most of the stuff, except for office. No problem, I thought, I'll just hit the metro app store and get the latest version of office instead of installing 2007. Hey, maybe it'll have some nifty tricks for win8.

No office in metro app store. If it IS there, sure is hard to find via search or browsing productivity apps.

And Windows 8 isn't that bad, once you get used to it. Its alot like office2007 with the new UI and ribbon - there's a definite learning curve but after getting used to it you find its not that bad. Still, Microsoft has a very very long way to get it to the wholistic experience its aiming for.

avatar

evertroy

Its not there because office 2013 is not a metro app, it runs in desktop mode. They had to do it that way so it would run on other versions of windows. Sure, i guess they can put a package installer or something, and I've also see where the app store has a button that takes you to the publishers site to download the desktop mode program.

avatar

Fray

What percentage of online Maximum PC readers use the website, and what percentage use the Metro app?

It should be pretty easy to see if this study sounds about right.

avatar

Granite

I have some problems with this "study". Now...I'm not knowledgeable about this sort of thing, but this is part of how they say they did it:

"We took the 200 most popular Windows 8 OEM-branded PCs. This sample included 10,927 PCs, representing the following vendors (in alphabetical order): Acer, Apple, Asus, Dell, HP, Lenovo, Samsung, Toshiba.

We had data from the following form factors: desktops, laptops with no touch screen, laptops with touch screen, tablets and convertibles. Since convertibles accounted for less than 1% of the sample, we disregarded them in this analysis, leaving us with 10,848 Windows 8 devices."

So...questions:

Who owned these devices?
Was the data given voluntarily?
Were the users businesses? Or private people?

It appears they didn't include people like me who use Win8...but who have built their own computer. For what it's worth, I use Modern UI apps much more than their study shows.

I suggest we all take this study with a grain of salt.

avatar

thematejka

Should the study be taken with a grain of salt? I answer by asking: Should we take all studies with a grain of salt? Yes and no, but it is hard to create a really good study and there are terrible ones.

I've had a lot of questions about this study, as well. Every study has shortcoming and I don't think this one was useful, as it merely regurgitates already generally accepted information (Windows 8 is not popular) in an "academic" and more "scientific" form. I don't have an issue with the results, but I'd be wary with actually making firm conclusions.

There is so much fuss about this product. Microsoft and everyone else are trying so hard to act like they know how successful W8 is. That's no surprise, as the truthful will be zealous about it and the liers and number-smudgers will do whatever they can to appear right.

At the very least, two things could be concluded with some reservations.

1) People were not ready for W8. It needed more polish and people are comfortable with great tech (W7 and XP).

2) Maybe people are/were expecting that this new tech should make things hassle-free and "organic." Although, you can't blame them. Tech companies hype things up so hard, they set themselves up for failure that way. The new fad word in the tech-design world is "organic." I know this all too well in web-design and it is a hard expectation to live up to. Frankly, I think organic experiences are unattainable, but something to aspire too. Who knows, maybe we will get there!!!

avatar

Renegade Knight

Soluto is a "Problem solving app" that looks at everything you run on your computer. It can be handy but it's also invasive out of necessity. Reporting all that to the mothership (it's more or less cloud based now)is probably built into the EULA/TOS.

Anyone can install it. I built my own computer and used it for a couple of years to shave boot times. It did solve a couple of crash related problems as well. When it went to the cloud and wanted me to create an account I bailed.

avatar

RUSENSITIVESWEETNESS

I wonder how many grams of coke go up Ballmer's nose every day? Clearly, he's so high he can't hear anything but the voices inside his own head.

avatar

captainjack

I wonder the same thing about my boss sometimes :P

avatar

GenMasterB

Being as Metro's UI is so good at single screen apps and forgets about multiple screens, shouldn't it just be called Window 8?
Just sayin..

avatar

Renegade Knight

Windows One?

avatar

Paladin25

Wait? What? You're depending on info from a group you railed on last month for saying a Macbook pro is the best Windows laptop? And you are calling it a study? With out all figures published?

avatar

Zanshi

Not surprising, considering most Windows users use a web browser and desktop programs instead of full screen, single task "apps". Welcome to DOS 8.0, folks!

avatar

USraging

Well i don't know type ver in the command prompt, we still maybe on 6.1.

avatar

kixofmyg0t

Speaking of Windows 8 apps....who the eff designed the MaximumPC app???

You would think that if ANY app would have some quality it would be "MaximumPC".

avatar

Shalbatana

windows 8 default apps....

the truth points to itself.

avatar

thematejka

There are two main problems here. Not with the study, but Metro. It is true, many people do not like Metro all that much (didn't need a study to find that out).

1) Metro has a terrible "app" cataloge in the store. There aren't enough of them and if it had more full-fledged desktop programs that would be nice. Fact is, people usually discover desktop programs on the web anyway.

2) That being said, Windows 8 totally alters the way power users and average users are used to Windows. One issue is that people aren't giving it a chance. People I know who actually give it an honest week or two get used to it and it works absolutely fine for them. It's how technology is, you make something new, it's a bit confusing, then you get used to it.

Moving back to Windows 8 trying to alter your experience, if they are going to do that, they'd better do it right, but that is a HUGE undertaking. They obviously failed at delivering an experience that you do not have to learn, but I don't think that is Microsoft's goal. Their goal/theme is to unify, simplify, and clean up interfaces, but this does not mean it gets any easier to learn how to use.

If people whine about Windows 8 they can move to Apple, but even Apple has an initial learning curve.

avatar

Sovereign

Of course, the "you just need to learn/try it" fallacy. Some of us know how to use it. And we don't. like. it. Sure, I'll grant that some people got scared off--but the bad press didn't appear for no reason.

I don't care if some people enjoy Windows 8, get more out of it than I do, etc. Kudos. Some people drive Hondas, Fords or Maybachs. I drive a Toyota. I don't begrudge or hate anyone for doing differently, but if they were to tell me I just haven't tried another brand enough, that if I did, I'd definitely switch, I'd not be happy with them.

This should not be framed as if people who don't like Metro/Modern just need to "learn" or "adapt" in the desktop area, implying those who don't use the Win8 interface on non-touch devices are somehow just not experienced enough in Win8 to truly appreciate it.

avatar

thematejka

I don't want to appear like I am berating people for not learning to deal with W8, I just hear a lot more hate for a piece of software that has actually turned out great for some. When people actually report good things, it is good to take note.

I am not begrudging or hating, I'm just bringing up a point of conversation. There is a very interesting trend where people complain and get used to things. Sometimes many people complain over a long time, sometimes people just get used to things. As a person who was never particularly resentful of relatively terrible software such as Vista, I was interested that some people and the press are so venomous. I guess what I am inquiring is, why does it matter so much?

So these questions intrigue me and I'm going a step farther than acknowledging people's different feelings of things like W8. I'm asking 'why' questions and meta-analyzing.

I find it interesting that my post was boiled down to some sort of textbook "you just need to learn/try it," "You haven't used it enough", "You haven't used it at all", and "Just learn keyboard shortcuts" type of post. I was not trying to tell people to shut up and deal with it as Zedro thought, I was opening up the dialogue by raising some points and questions. That is one way to have an open dialogue.

That's right, I'm actually inviting an open dialogue. If that's not apparent to you, go figure it out.

avatar

Zedro

I couldn't agree more. I also find it fascinating that if anyone posts intelligent counter agument to the "You haven't used it enough", "You haven't used it at all", and "Just learn keyboard shortcuts" posts, no one ever comes back to defend their position.

Windows 8 and Windows RT are billed as a content consumption AND creation platform. Beyond office, what "apps" are truly more productive then their desktop counterparts? How are businesses using the app platform? Are they using it at all?

Yes, you could use twitter, Facebook, and Google Plus to "create" content, but that can be done on android and the ipad. Better on those platform because they're more fleshed out.

What does Windows 8 bring new, fresh, and better than the competitors?

I don't expect Windows 8 fan boys to answer my questions. It's just too hard to have an open dialogue with them. They would rather those of us with half a brain to just "shut up and deal with it".

avatar

BlutUndFeuer

I agree. Windows seems to be losing the content creation mentality and replacing it with that of consumption. Also, I'm sick to death of the "you just haven't used it" argument. I have used it. I attempted to be productive with Metro for a week or so, failed, and then loaded Start8 and my workflow was back to tip top shape. There's a lot of really good stuff under the surface, but I can't bring myself to say ANYTHING good about Metro.

avatar

DoctorX

This

avatar

AFDozerman

I'm curious as to what the actual usage rate for metro itself is. I know I use it to launch real programs all the time, but maybe a couple apps a day at most, mainly due to the fact that music player stops working when I go back to desktop mode, so I just stick to the alternatives on the desktop.

avatar

ScottInCalgary

I know things were designed for touch screens (which just does not translate when using a traditional monitor with keyboard and mouse), but the most ridiculous thing I've found about Windows 8 is that the Metro apps run full-screen. I know, you can tile two apps on the screen at once, but even that is stupid. For an OS named "Windows" they've sure taken a wrong turn.

I installed the Classic Shell start menu and since then the only time I've ever gone back to the Win8 Start Screen is when I moved my mouse too low on the screen and accidentally clicked on the shortcut to open it.

avatar

MTCWBY

That once a day was a fat finger trying to find the damn start button.

avatar

Scatter

I don't need apps, I can run programs on my PC.

avatar

thematejka

app = program

program = app

avatar

maxeeemum

So lets see!!!!!!!!!

M$ Office 2013 = app

Fart Machine = program

I don't think so!!!!!!!!!

avatar

Scatter

Apps seem to require an exclusive app store. Programs don't.

avatar

jbitzer

App is an abbreviation of application. Program and application are interchangeable. However, in our desire to devolve into duckspeak as quickly as possible, we bastardize and misuse words whenever it will save half a keystroke, so you are both right.

avatar

USraging

+1 to this! finally some common sense.

avatar

azuza001

I believe Gordon would disagree with that if I remember some of his rants correctly. :)

avatar

ScytheNoire

The Metro interface is designed for touch screen devices. It works great with the tablet and phone (I have a Nokia WP8). But it's useless with the desktop and only hurt sales and adoption of Windows 8. No one wants to touch it (pun intended).

avatar

Renegade Knight

Works fine on non touch screens. So much so that we don't use the touch functions all that often.

avatar

John Pombrio

Too right, mate. The only app that I use is Mahjong! I find the apps are just web page wannabes.
If there are apps that you like but you are mainly a desktop user, check out ModernMix by Stardock that opens TIFKAM apps in a window on the desktop. Works great and they act just like windows.

avatar

kixofmyg0t

I personally use the Tunein app everyday.

Reddhub, Netflix, and Twitter get used often though I can't claim everyday.

avatar

Thresher

Hard to use things that don't exist. Without compelling apps, there is no reason to use the MetroUI.

Considering that Metro is more of a hinderance on a PC, there is no reason to write apps for it.

Vicious cycle in the making.

avatar

wolfing

If they add a Metro app that reverts back to Windows 7, I bet the numbers would go up for desktop users

Log in to MaximumPC directly or log in using Facebook

Forgot your username or password?
Click here for help.

Login with Facebook
Log in using Facebook to share comments and articles easily with your Facebook feed.