OCZ's Synapse Cache SSD Gives Your Hard Drive a Break

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DJConan

I wonder what it would do in a system with an SSD boot drive already installed. I would be interested in something like this to improve performance on the programs I have installed on my mechanical drives. But obviously, I do not want it changing things with the programs running on my already installed SSD.

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mailman65er@gma...

I think this is targeted at using the SSD as a cache for a typical HDD. Since you already set up your SSD as a "boot" drive, you would have extra work in imaging that to a big fat HDD, so you could use the SSD as a cache, but the end result would be alot better. ...accelerate 'all' you important data/apps on the HDD...

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vrmlbasic

So this SSD is designed to cache frequently used data without requiring anything more than a normal SATA 6gbps port (ie:no wonky intel-exclusive tech)?  If so, what determines the data that needs to be cached, as my first thought is some OCZ software program, which has the hated downside of overhead?

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I Jedi

As I have stated bnefore, my next planned rig is an Ivy Bridge build. I am wanting to use a PCIe SSD from OCZ as my C drive for Windows. What you talk about, with caching, I have also considered, but currently I am only considering a 64MB cache from two HDD. 

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Cykotr0n.

Why not use the PCI-E Revodrive as your C drive and use thise on your storage drive (Like for your steam games and movies etc.).

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mailman65er@gma...

I've been following this caching thing for awhile now. I think you guys are missing the point. Using an SSD as a boot drive is really primitive compared to using the SSD as a cache, like this Synapse from OCZ. Why would you waste your precious (=expensive) SSD bits on storing stagnant data the never/rarely gets used (like the bulk of the space dedicated to OS)? Once you think about it, it makes alot more sense to have software that automatically manages all this for you, so that you can just manage one big C drive, that performs very close to SSD levels, without managing or moving files/apps etc. you can also get by with a smaller SSD, like 60GB, which might get a little full (=dangerous) if you have your os and all apps + all your critical data on it. if you get nearly full, and then have an os update or patch - boom....

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Coldrage

Do you install onto it or is it basically just a large cache?

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vrmlbasic

I'm curious how this drive will know what data is frequently accessed in order to cache it.  Is there a performance hit while caching?

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I Jedi

Intel has a new feature coming out, if it isn't already, which store frequently used information onto a dedicated SSD. I forget what the term is called, but this is how your computer will know where to put frequently used files in.

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