OCZ Sacks 28 Percent of Staff, Drops 150 Product Lines

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maddingo

many years ago I remember getting 1GB dual channel ram (2x512MB) for the low price of $225~ish... mushkin ...one of the sticks was defective out of the package...PIA as I recall having to RMA it back to newegg and wait on the replacement sticks.

oh well..

I much preferred getting 16GB of DDR3 (Corsair) for $49.99 at fry's on sale awhile ago.

true story i don't think i have ever bought one single thing from OCZ...and I guess if for some reason i want to add that accomplishment to my checklist i may want to get on it soon =p

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methuselah

I stopped buying OCZ SSD's when I found out their SSD chipsets were proprietary. Making data recovery from crashed drives impossible. Yes, literally impossible, go ahead, please try and find a data recovery company that can do a recovery on OCZ drives. Supposedly they were going to change to a more standard chip but don't know when.

I hope they end up fixing their problems... I still have a 3 yr old 760w PC Power and Cooling PS. It's the best I've ever owned. I'll buy it again if OCZ stays alive.

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Meat_Juice

Comment removed. Wrong column.

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BlazePC

Not all DRAM sells at cost; especially in the enthusiast segment.
OCZ were masters of producing high-quality performance RAM.
I agree with those that said they should have stayed in that line of business. They could have streamlined that but not exited entirely.
Bad move.

It's the SSD segment that got them into trouble.
Too many permutations and conflicting internal branding.
Other brands rule that space because they have bigger backing behind them - translated: leverage. Intel, Samsung and Crucial (Micron) immediately come to mind.

The business environment is tough these days.
Blame it on the liberals and the bureaucrats.

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dgrmouse

@BlazePC - If you think the DRAM market doesn't have strong existing value networks to subvert and co-opt small players then you're wrong. This is true for "high quality performance RAM" just as it is true for SSDs. OCZ has made lots of risky plays (that neural input device thingamajig, as an example), but I can't pretend to know what in particular got them into trouble - how on Earth can you? And then to say that their current downturn is related to liberal politics? You need to right your perspectives.

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Jeffredo

I'll blame it on the administration that this whole mess going (and it was pre-2008). But that's another story.

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Jeffredo

Bought their RAM in 2009, have a PC Power and Cooling PS and have used their OCZ Freeze TIM (now discontinued). Was pretty satisfied with all of them. Its a shame to see them seemingly going down for the count.

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tekknyne

Putting shareholders before customers and employees? I'll look somewhere else thanks.

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jgottberg

If you don't satisfy shareholders (AKA, investors), your company doesn't have the capitol it needs to support exisiting products or new ones. Once investors get wind that the money they are investing isn't a priority, you lose all investors and have a serious cash flow problem. it's a catch 22

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avenger48

You act as though you have to choose. Satisfying one generally satisfies the others. You make a product people want to buy, they buy it, you make money, shareholders make money, and everyone's happy. It's what basically every successful business does. This notion that you can only satisfy one or the other is ludicrous.

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tekknyne

You really need to read more. I suggest googling "Maximizing Shareholder Value: The Dumbest Idea in the World". It's a Forbes article that might help you out.

Maximizing shareholder value only works for... shareholders. That's all. Why do you think the US economy is shit? You put investors first and next thing you find is that they're sitting on 10 trillion dollars in banks while our economy falls apart. That's a great recipe for a thriving, healthy middle class right? No.

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jgottberg

If you want to pick ONE article on the web that supports your argument, that's cool. I happen to live in the real world. You can google all the anti-corporate articles you want but it won't change the fact that the world revolves around money. Without it, a business is not in business very long.

Let me ask you.... What comes first, a product or a customer? if you answered customer, I suggest more google'ing.

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nbrowser

They should of stuck to the DRAM market, they knew what they were doing ! 3 years on with my X58 build and all 6 OCZ modules in the motherboard are ticking along quite well, not one fault to be had.

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wolfing

disagree. DRAM is overflooded and they would pretty much be selling those modules at cost, if that.
The move to SSDs was good, they just need to get rid of all the other fat.

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USraging

I remember back in the day buying 2GB of OCZ Gold Edition DDR RAM. They worked perfectly and i spent $370 for the set of 2 modules. This gave me bragging rights to all my gamer friends.

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dgrmouse

USraging said, "i spent $370 for the set of 2 modules. This gave me bragging rights to all my gamer friends."

/facepalm.

I will help you name stars at the low, low price of $2,000 USD each anytime you'd like. You will have amazing bragging rights, and I can even throw in certificates of authenticity.

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vrmlbasic

I'm glad those days are behind us. May they never come again. I enjoyed my RAM buying experience last year where I picked up 16 GB of DDR3-1600 RAM for under 100 bucks. As I understand it my current processor can't take full advantage of anything over 1333 Mhz RAM, but when prices were so cheap there was no reason to not get a little "future proofing" in. Now even 1866 MHz RAM is cheap en masse.

For 370 bucks I bought my SSD, Processor, and RAM last year and even had enough for the shipping left over. I'm glad that times have changed.

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DU00

Same here, glad those days are over. I remember paying around $150 about 3 years ago for 6GB of DDR3-1600. Got another 6GB last year for a third of that.

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