Nvidia CEO: Nvidia Cloud-Based GeForce Grid GPUs Will Bring Videogames To The Masses

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pcpwnerer

what internet speed would someone need for this!?

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h e x e n

This is an incredibly stupid idea in my opinion. Essentially, customers are giving up what they used to own in exchange for a financial IV drip on a month to month basis.

As far as the consumer is concerned, this is insulting and it's the same reason I will never get behind any sort of streaming based gaming system or software. Call me crazy, but I like actually locally owning the files of ths software I use.

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jonnyohio

As a web programmer I know how easy it is to prevent double posts....fix it already.

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jonnyohio

"We believe this will do for video games what cable television did for video,"

Great...soon we will be paying $80 a month for video games we never play just to have access to the two we want to play. I can't wait.

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Neufeldt2002

"Great...soon we will be paying $80 a month for video games we never play just to have access to the two we want to play. I can't wait."

I really hope it doesn't go that way, but I can see it ending up at those costs in the long run.

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kixofmyg0t

I didn't know JohnP was renting out his nVidia render farm.....

Last time I checked he was trying to break the million frames per second barrier in World of Warcraft. :/

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noobstix

Let's see...pay $60 for a game that I can play as many times as I can with little to no hiccups or pay some fee per month for a cloud service to play the game as many times as I want but with the great chance of annoying lag and other horrible things? In theory, it's a good idea but in actuality, it's just like dumping money on WoW or other P2P online games. Developers right now can't even provide quality service for their online games (EA, Activision, Ubisoft, etc.). I think Nvidia's case won't be any different if they go through with this. Sure you can argue that it's in an "infant stage" but what happens when it's "fully ready"? Will it be able to provide flawless streaming right off the bat or will gamers still have to suffer lag and other glitches that are detrimental to their experiences?

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bobthegoat2001

I liked the idea of Online for being able to try the 30 minute trials of full games, or for doing the subscription for $9.99 a month. But for buying actual games (that could disappear at any time) isn't really a good idea. I liked the idea of playing games on my laptop, then continuing on again on my laptop.

When I actually tried it out though, it ended up not being a very good experience. Even though I have 12mbit internet (quite a bit higher than the 3mbit minimum and 5mbit recommended), the games didn't play very well. The screen would tear and skip a lot and for certain games the lag was pretty bad (like driving games).

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RUSENSITIVESWEETNESS

Does anyone else have a problem with government and industry taking computing power and data away from private individuals? Naturally, they're not going to do so with a gun to our heads, but instead by means subversive and patient.

What happens when we no longer have local storage, but are required to pay a monthly fee for someone else to hold our data? Then our data is no longer our property, but something we "rent" from another, something that can be examined, copied, sold or marketed at will.

And the public should give up having computational devices, because someone in the government is afraid we'll use technology toward nefarious ends? In the 1990's, Congress proposed legislation requiring motherboard manufacturers to include a means by which the U.S. government could disable personal computers remotely. That kind of paranoid planning likely never went away.

When we are no longer allowed to own technology, or even our own private information, we are just slaves to the machine or cattle for slaughter.

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szore

Welcome to the Socialist Utopian Fantasy. Burp.

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amirault0

This is a good point, but I can't see that happening for a very long time. Even if it did, they can't completely take technology away. Phones, tablets, and laptops are only getting more powerful with more storage. I think there will always be a "local" option for people who don't want to use the cloud.

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Happy

You are 100% correct and people need to WAKE UP!!!!

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tekknyne

You make a good point. While cloud computing is cool for keeping your stuff sync'd on your laptop, desktop and tablet, it's always been a conundrum to me. The big pitch is to put all that CPU and storage overhead on these servers instead of your computer, but I have a quad core desktop with CPU overhead and disk space for days, so what exactly is the point?

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Zoandar

VERY well said. There are no "free rides". If someone, or worse, some committee, wants to do this we should all wonder "why"? Is it to make our gaming life more cool? I doubt it. Operating such a network would be very costly. Corporations only spend money for a single reason.

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shahid061

i hope so that it will be a good addition in latest technologist.Quotes of the day

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RaptorJohnson

Ehh, this will induce lag, but a different kind of lag then we've come to accept.

Currently when we play Online FPSs hit detection for the client is done (usually) on the client's PC. That results in the user being slightly behind the server's game, but as long as the user made what looked like a good hit on the client computer the server will count it as a hit.

This results in the rare but annoying cases of someone being shot after they thought they had ducked behind cover, as the attacking user pulled the trigger before the attacker's PC received the message that the ducking user had attempted to dodge.

Aside from that the user experiences no lag in their own movements/actions in the game.

With server side games like from the article we will have to wait for the server to receive messages for ALL user actions, resulting in a noticeable lag between when a command is given (like jumping) and when the user executes the jump.

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Phantom-e

The Onlive gaming service is a good example of this phenomenon. Move forward? Wait a split second. Want to strafe? It's like you weigh 500 pounds because you can't move that much lard that quickly.

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MastaGuy

I don't see this working well with online games because of the delay, but this could be good for single player games.

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carage

This would just turn any single player game into an online game...

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streetking

I believe MastaGuy is speaking of multiplayer online games, which I can understand. I would think the lag would be tremendous...

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rwpritchett

This is a very interesting concept. I wonder what affect it would have on the industry. Right now, PC gaming means you've gotta go Windows. But this could essentially expand gaming to Linux and OSX who are traditionally weak in that area.

And then there's the portability aspect. Any handheld device that has internet (WiMax maybe?) and h.264 decode could play any game that a desktop can play.

Some games still require some CPU horsepower. I wonder how that comes into play on this GeForce grid...

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Valor958

I'm mixed about this really. I see if being very beneficial to MANY people, however as a PC enthusiast... I'd feel a bit bummed about it. There's a chance it could also lead to a complacency that stops advancement of games and they're associated tech due to the ready availability of it. Devs would make a game scaled to perform optimally on the GPU-cloud service. Due to 'cross-platform' availability it WOULD increase available gamers for titles by a ton. This leads to those same devs working only towards that service to increase their chances of turning their profit margin. Profits will likely increase, but would advancement grind to a halt over time? I'm sure we'll find out soon, but hopefully companies don't dive head first in, and just test the waters first. Taking already available games and selling licenses through their service (IE: Steam), then streaming directly through that service instead of just using it as a launch portal with the data stored locally. Honestly.. I can see Steam investing in this as well as it could provide a boon to the service they already provide. You can take and play your entire Steam account on any compatible device.. anywhere.
You know what... as I type this, I'm actually liking the idea more and more. Assuming it's implemented properly.

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reimermatt

But can it run crysis at max settings?

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amirault0

massive numbers of kepler based servers...yes I think it can handle any game you want when it's in sleepmode haha

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Neufeldt2002

At this point I will stick to the computer to game. In the future? who knows things change, but I prefer my own hardware and the ability to tinker with it.

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