Next Generation H.265 Codec Gets Ready to Rock with Ultra HDTV Resolution in 2013

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Blackheart-1220

Does this mean I should sell my blu-ray collection?

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axiomatic

This is all great and good.... but you still have the broadcasting companies dragging their feet on pushing an uncompressed 1080p signal to our homes.

Good luck with that H.265. I hope you win. I really do.

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Hey.That_Dude

Uncompressed? Where are you getting your content from?
That's HUGE! Do you even understand what you're asking for? There isn't anyway of delivering that kind of bandwidth except via Fiber Optic. And while I'm all for FTTH, 90% of homes in America (let alone anywhere else) don't have that kind of infrastructure to handle that data.
Not Even BD are uncompressed!

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yammerpickle2

I can't wait to get past the 1080P barrier in consumer HD TV.

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AndrewHume1

H.264 is a standard of media, even when h.265 IS is full swing doesn't mean you should "throw out your old TV", h.265 won't affect it, and even if it did, it wouldn't be the TV at fault but the source that would need to be upgraded

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DarkMatter

~hmmm .. what kind of processing power will one require to compress in real time ? ( damn .. already looking at a new build as soon as the motherboard of choice and processor comes out end of Q1 2012)

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Hey.That_Dude

This sounds awesome. I've been waiting for this since they started saying 1080p was the de facto standard. Imagine... BD with QFHD movies and special features on a 50GB disc... SWEET!

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Cache

Any bets as to how much my local cable provider (Time Warner) will charge for that when it comes out? Nevermind that watching a single 1.5 minute YouTube video will take 2 hours just to load up.

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Hey.That_Dude

That's why the new codec is being made. To compress that data so that smaller data streams can carry it. It's not just some new resolution support.
As for TW and all other TV providers:
My bet is that the codec will cost money to buy rights to use. That will give them yet another excuse to raise their rate well beyond fair compensation...yet again. Even if it was free I bet it'd still cost more just cause it's "a new innovation"...

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acidic

none of this will matter once apple "invents" tv supposedly later this year as the iTV will be the talk of the town and will revolutionize how we view multimedia

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JohnP

The only real use for these mega high resolutions will be for gigantic TVs. the biggest I can fit into my house right now is 40". No use for 8K on a 40" TV (until I see one up close I guess).

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praetor_alpha

"None of this means you should toss your existing HDTV on eBay or Craigslist."

You just gotta know that some dumbass will anyway.

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stradric

I imagine such a crazy hi-res display might be better suited for digital movie theaters rather than consumer products. At least, I imagine it will be there first.

As far as 4320p consumer products, there must be some hefty hardware required to decode and process that immense data stream. Even Eyefinity displays only go up to about 3200 lines. I guess we're only talking about rasterization though, rather than rendering 3D objects.

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deadlift1

While the prospect of an 8k display is tantalizing these advances in pixel density will be wasted if there is no content to enjoy. HDTV is still broadcast in 1080i or 720p and even those signals undergo quite a bit of compression due to the lack of available bandwidth. Our only legit 1080p source is blu-ray which is sad. The next step before 8k is going to be 4k which Sony is heavily promoting with its new projector yet again no content exists. This is chicken before egg syndrome at its finest but the chicken is so far ahead of the egg (or vice versa?) that it might never catch up.

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Hey.That_Dude

All that content is compressed. It's just that they further compress the data. Don't be fooled, even your BD is compressed source.
The reason why 1080i & 720p are so prevalent is that bandwidth, signal integrity, and latency MUST be taken into consideration for the ATSC (or what ever that acrynom is) standard. BECAUSE, it is used to standardize ALL (read EVERY FREAKING ONE) of the delivery media (i.e. OtA, cable, IPTV)

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dgrmouse

DirecTV and other satellite providers offer 1080p content. Comcast has some 1080p hardware and content, as well. Check it out.

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