More Layoffs on the Way at AMD

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Jeffredo

I'm still waiting for a reason to upgrade. Have a Phenom II Quad @ 4.0 Ghz and all I do is gaming and general computing tasks. At that speed its more or less as fast as an FX 8350 stock and uses no more power. Yes, that's as fast as it can go and the FX can of course overclock much more, but it turns into a complete power pig beyond stock. Been at my current configuration since summer of 2009. Almost 3 1/2 years later and this is the best they can do? I'm afraid that after the old Phenom II can't do the job anymore (probably another year) there won't be any reason to look at AMD for a significant upgrade. Good chance they might not even be there.

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Rift2

This really is too bad you know some of the talent they are letting go is the brains behind the chips. Steamroller or whatever might never come out.....

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Jims45wow

I'm probably violating a rule, but, all of the Windows 8 articles are closed for comment--And I have a question that I saw not to be covered in the reviews, and their extensions:

WILL Windows 8 built-in network setups be compatible with Windows 7?

Thank you.

Oh, and yeah: Moral Support for AMD included.

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joshnorem

We close the comments otherwise they get littered with spam. For your question we have not tested this specifically but I can't see a reason why it would not work. Windows 8 is still basically Windows 7.

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Neufeldt2002

From what I have seen online for the two OS's getting along in Homegroup it is kind of hit and miss for some, and Win 8 likes to be top dog.

http://bit.ly/10hFvOk

The above link is just a quick Google on Windows 8 and Windows 7 Homegroup and it gives mixed results, though some are with pre RTM versions of 8 but some are not.

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Andrew.Hodge

I don't know, but I'll check for you ASAP, as I have an old server I have long since retired that's been on ubuntu for a couple years in my closet. I've been wanting to put 7 on it as well as a couple other OSes for awhile to play around with, so I'll check how well it talks to my win8 desktop.

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saffy

Let's see a government bailout!

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ptellini

Once intel came out with the i-series which took the best of both worlds and put it into one chip AMD just couldnt catch up but instead went for the budget processor competition.

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Happy

The reason AMD is dying and soon to be completely dead (unless they are bought by a very rich company who can sink billions into research and development to help AMD catch up to Intel) is because AMD failed to keep up with Intel's tick tock schedule of regular shrinking of the nanometer size of the transistors and, alternating with that, the new architectures. AMD has been lately trying to survive at 32nm and neglecting to do the necessary research and development needed to keep shrinking along with Intel as Intel went to 22nm and is going lower the year after next. If Moore's Law wasn't still in effect then AMD would be doing just fine now but that's not the case and failing to keep up with Moore's Law spells certain death for a company making powerful CPUs. I think the advantage that Intel got by mastering FinFET technology put them years ahead of AMD (just like they said it would when they came out with the news a while ago) and this massive headstart made it impossible for AMD to catch them, especially considering AMD just gave up in trying to and decided to try to optimize their chips on 32nm instead of trying to get to 22nm or 20nm.

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QUINTIX256

Global Foundries is responsible for shrinks. The only other fab that can equal GloFo is TSMC. What you are saying is that not only is AMD doomed, but Qualcomm, Nvidia, Apple, etc are doomed. They are not. The fact that AMD could even do an inventory write down on llano shows that GloFo has ample capacity.

Intel's lead is incredibly costly; they are not in a position to share R&D costs and buy common fab equipment like Samsung, IBM, Glofo can. AMD is 2 billion in debt. Intel has 7 billion worth of long term debt.

http://ycharts.com/companies/INTC/long_term_debt

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Gezzer

Long term debt isn't a bad thing. Most companies carry some sort of debt load. The problem is how healthy the company is and what are the prospects of them defaulting on the long term debt.
Right now neither Intel nor AMD is doing great due to a number of factors, but Intel over all is healthier then AMD and that's what matters to wall street and the bankers.
As well your statement about the die shrink problems putting Qualcomm, Nvidia, and Apple equally in trouble would be true if they were competing in the x86/x64 market but they're not. They're all using GloFo to produce either ARM chips or GPU chips which is like comparing apples to oranges.

AMD was fine and could get by on OEM and fanboi sales, but OEM sales have been drying up since 2008 and there's only so many fanbois out there so AMD has to refocus on becoming competitive on more then just bang for buck. Another factor is that moving to a APU has possibly cannibalized the entry level discrete GPU sales that AMD used to get. Entry and mid level is considered the major cash cows in the graphics card market. So who knows how much that market was reduced.

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lastbluesun

AMD is awesome, I don't see why things are going so badly. Why not steal someone from Intel and get some inspiration?

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vistageek

I thought their latest fx-8350 cpu and its variants were really good for the price. What gives?

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Andrew.Hodge

Marketing, for the most part. Piledriver and HD7K are great parts. GCN is equal to Kepler clock for clock and way better in GPGPU. Piledriver, while slower than ivy bridge, is still a great chip at stock and overclocks like a beast; there are plenty of reputable people out there on the interwebs getting it to 5 GHZ stable on water. It even made it into the world's newest number 1 supercomputer, albeit playing second fiddle to tesla GPUs. All of that means nothing, though, if you can't get the word out to the consumers that you have good products.

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HiGHRoLLeR038

Just like bulldozer, their new chips were a huge let down. They're using an obsolete 32nm manufacturing process compared to intel's 22nm which makes them faster/cooler. Their most expensive chip can barely keep up with a Core i5. Also, they're still utilizing the AM3 socket which has power delivery and some performance issues. AMD just doesn't have the cash or genius minds that Intel has to pour into R&D.

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Arnulf

Incidentally, their fastest chip also costs less than an Intel Core i5 so price/performance-wise they are pretty much there, they are simply not competing at the enthusiast level anymore.

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vistageek

They're a letdown if you're running last gen apps. In anything multithreaded, they kick butt. The latest fx chip is 30% faster than ivybridge i5 in cinebench. 25% faster than ivybridge. Older apps and games are a disadvantage, but newer games like bf3 and bfbc2, especially in multiplayer, actually run better on the amd cpu's. Now obviously, these holes in performance can't be excused, but I don't think you'd ever notice the difference between the latest intel i5 and amd fx, even with sli or crossfire.

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T3RR0RH4WK

C'mon, AMD, pull through. :/

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slibinz

Amen to that. The last thing the struggling US and EU economies need is for Intel to have a monopoly over CPUs so they can jack their prices up. Intel chips already cost more than they're worth, I shudder thinking about how much they'll cost if AMD kicks the bucket.

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renodude18

Indeed AMD needs to pull through this..

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