Microsoft Pushes Hard To Convert Users to Subscriptions With Office 2013

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RUSENSITIVESWEETNESS

Absolutely looking forward to downloading and sharing cracked versions of the operating system and office software. I will pirate all of it before paying Microsoft a monthly fee to use my computer.

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Shalbatana

No more subscriptions. No more monthly plans. Too many, and not enough living up to their promise to begin with.

Not paying $2000+ for a data plan on a 2 year contract just so I can look up what actor was in what movie. My phone is a phone, and a prepaid service lets me use it as such.

Not paying for gold plus membership just so I can watch netflix (a subscription in itself) on my xbox when the interface sucks and the wii is perfectly capable.

Not paying monthly subscriptions to 10 different music and video companies just so I can get more TV that still doesn't have exactly what I want to watch.

Not paying a monthly fee for an office suite.

No more subscriptions!

I can barely pay my monthly train ticket price (that's about to go up again).

It's just another form of credit payments...something that's ruining our country enough already.

Figure out a better way guys!

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PCWolf

THIS!!!

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NavarWynn

Boy, that's a great decision on their part... In a day and age when FREE office suites that are as functional (or more) than the bloatware MS office has become, they decide to restrict our ability to USE the product we pay $$$+ for? Sheer idiocy, they are going to boot THEMSELVES out of the market.

I don't want another cable bill just so I can use my PC...

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ilfipian

MS succeeded in large part because they were the value choice.

From Win8/Office2013 forward, they seem to have given up on this market position.

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aarcane

Sadly, I think I'd have to keep a couple subscriptions to windows current for those few business, academic, and pleasure pursuits that still manage to require windows for one purpose or another, however, I've made great strides toward desktop linux in recent years, and use it on everything except, well, my desktop, which is used primarily for gaming.

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Hey.That_Dude

I moved to office libre. I had access to a free copy for students for Microsoft Office and the hassle of simply installing it was such a turn off that I went with the open source version.

3 Clicks to install Office Libre.
20 Clicks, Several downloads, one disc burn, and a final install of the product.
Who the hell would choose M$?

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pastorbob

I tried Office Libre in a couple of different versions. The main problem I ran into was compatibility all of my MS Office files. I have about 10 years worth of Word documents, Powerpoint presentations and Excel spreadsheets. Every time I tried to import them over to Office Libre, they would get so kludged up that I spent more time fixing them than If I just started from scratch. I reuse too many of my files to start over.

Additionally, I found Office Libre less intuitive than MS Office. But I have been using MS Office since Office '97 so I guess that is to be expected. Old habits die hard.

For somebody just getting into using an Office Suite, Libre Office would be an excellent choice.

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Hey.That_Dude

Just out of curiousity, why were you converting? Libre can save direct to M$ doc, ppt, and exl. It can open them all as well. I converted over with only a few problems (lack of installed pic art being one a few small caveats).

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Lednaara

Except Office Libre is nowhere near as powerful. Now if your one of the people that does nothing more than type up reports for school or simple spreadsheets it's great. But if your an auditor or an investment manager or anyone else that REALLY uses Office, then Libre can't compare at all. Same with google's. The only non MS office suite I've seen that comes even close to the power of MS Office was Lotus SmartSuite. But IBM ran that one into the ground.

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Hey.That_Dude

Yeah, Lotus was great. Really a pity on that one.

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Lednaara

All these poor people that have had to use Outlook/Exchange for all this time just never saw the power of Notes/Domino. I know people who's company switched from Notes to Outlook and they STILL miss Notes.

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Neufeldt2002

There is a new version (4.0) of Libre Office available, some say it really closes the gap between Libre and MS. I personally would not know if it did or not, nor do I really care as I fall into the category of those that don't need Office. However I would venture to guess that the majority of MS Office users fall into the "would take to much time to convert" rather than MS being vastly more superior. I am sure that MS has features that are superior, just as I am sure that not everyone NEEDS MS Office to get their work done.

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Lednaara

I'd agree with that. I was just basing on the superiority of the features and capabilities. I bet it most likely falls onto time it would take to convert for most users. I remember back in college being told even the most hard core Excel users still don't use but 10 to 15% of what it can do.

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winmaster

Microsoft announced the Office 2013 license terms ages ago. Seriously, MaxPC, quit copying shit from other ¨news¨ sites, your embarrassing yourself.

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Renegade Knight

I just learned about that with this article. Thankfully I spent 9.95 or so via the home program. However even that's too much if I have to spend it again when I upgrade this Lemon of a laptop I have.

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pastorbob

I doubt that they are embarrassed in the least. If you are a regular reader of this magazine then you would know they have done several articles on Office 2013 beginning last spring.

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vistageek

*you're

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Thresher

I am trying to think of reasons why I would want a subscription rather than just the standard version. I really cannot think of any. Perhaps if I were a college student and just needed it for a short while, but otherwise, why would I do this? Why would I want yet ANOTHER monthly fee on top of all my other bills. It's not like there aren't competitive products out there, some of which cost nothing.

That said, I do have a full version of Office 2013 and I like it very much.

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Nixon

"Would you consider paying Microsoft an annual fee to use Windows? It could very well come to that by the time Windows 9 ships. ."

Nahh. The SkyDrive/Google Docs has already provided all that I need as a college student.
I've read up on the subscription stuff and it really does sound interesting with the added services that it provides. But honestly anyone with a little know how can easily make up those services for free without the aid of illegal software.

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pastorbob

It amazes me how any article about Microsoft brings out the haters, trolls and critics. You get not only a decent upgrade to Office but also an additional 20 gig of SkyDrive space. But it isn't without some bugs.

I bought Office 2010 Home and Student edition in November and got a free upgrade to Office 2013. I had a choice to go with a free one year subscription to Office 365 (on 5 systems) or a single install standalone 2013. Naturally I went with the free subscription since we have five computers between our home and my office that all have Office on them. However after installing it on my main desktop it kludged up my SkyDrive and it got stuck in an endless loop updating but never completing it. I went to MS Support and they tell me they are aware of the problem and there is a fix being developed.

So for now I have removed Office 365, deactivated the install and my SkyDrive began to work properly. Once they fix the SkyDrive bug I will give it another try. The one bonus out of the whole fiasco is I still have the extra 20 gig of SkyDrive storage. And once they fix the SkyDrive problem I will have it installed on all of my systems. Working as we do between a home office, business office and a laptop as well as my wife's laptop and desktop it is a nice setup. $100 a year for MS Office on five systems and an additional 20 gig of cloud storage is a bargain no matter how you look at it. Especially since I got the first year free. And to top it off I was able to keep Office 2010 installed as a separate app.

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RUSENSITIVESWEETNESS

I wipe my ass with 20 GB. Cloud storage? That's for people too stupid to set up their own server.

Microsoft has nothing on the table worth the inflated subscription prices.

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pastorbob

"Cloud storage? That's for people too stupid to set up their own server."

Or for people who don't need more than 27 GB.

Or for people who don't have the time and money to maintain a separate server.

Or for people who are not technically inclined and cloud storage is a fast and easy way to access their files remotely. I know a lot of people who don't have technical knowhow or aptitude but they are far from stupid.

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Renegade Knight

You also get more draconian licensing in that it's only good on one PC. Before you could have 2 or three installs. Plus transfer it as needed as you upgrade.

What you have now is a rental. Even at 9.95 via the home program this price is too high. Now that I've learned about this. I'm done with office and regret spending what little I spent on it.

100 a year for a 'subscription' that could cost me my documents? No thanks. I'd rather convert to ODF.

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pastorbob

I agree that the move to a single license for the standalone version is a bummer. It's obvious Microsoft is trying to force people toward the subscription version.

But the online version can be installed on 5 systems, And as far as losing your documents, there is a copy of the SkyDrive folder on each system. Even standalone SkyDrive provides that feature.

Besides, you should always backup documents and data files regardless of what programs you do or don't use and whether or not you use the cloud.

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warptek2010

For $10.00 bucks a month will it also entertainment us with movies or something because as MS knows... everybody in the world uses Office 24HRS a day/365 days a year non-stop. Yes, thats right Balmer... the MS faithful sit glued to their desks or tablets PC's and chug away in Word, Excel, PP etc... thats all we do, all day long. Pee breaks? Nah, we pee in our pants getting the most out of your Office suite for $10 bucks a month.

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livebriand

If Windows went to a subscription-only model, I would go to a piracy-only model. I am not subscribing monthly to anything. I would much rather buy the item outright and use it for as long as I damn well please, with Windows or Office. As it is, they've screwed up the pricing on Office 2013 badly enough that I have no desire to upgrade to it, aside from pirating it.

I wonder how they'd get away with that with Windows though - you buy a PC, and eventually, to continue using the physical hardware you already bought, paid for, and own, you have to pay up? That won't go well with people.

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Hey.That_Dude

Might I suggest a Free and Open Source Software alternative to pirating? Even if you pirate their crap that just means that you still depend on M$, even if only to steal from them. Try Open Office or Office Libre. They're free and don't require you to break the law to get.

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livebriand

I've tried LibreOffice, and the problem is just that it has compatibility issues even with pretty basic documents sometimes (school stuff), and I don't like the interface much compared to office 2007/2010/2013. Hey, either way, Microsoft is getting $0. Of course, that's the case if I stay with an old version of Office as well, so whatever...

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zeroibis

Glad I am still using office 03. From the looks of it I may be using it forever. When it no longer installs I will likely ditch office for good. One of the worst things in the subscription model is that they can toss changes that suck down at you and you have no choice.

Imagine if your windows 7 turned into windows 8 over night and there was no way to get windows 7 back....

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livebriand

I love how with these things, companies go out of their way to be illogical (while trying to discourage piracy), while piracy solves all the problems they're causing for people. Same with other things, like trailers on DVDs, or DRM.

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Paper Jam

I don't doubt that MS will still be able to sell Office to enterprise and business customers using this new sales model. But average consumers are getting accustom to a completely different business model with the explosion of smartphones and tablets. Software is drastically cheaper and the OS and its updates are free. Yes, smartphones and tablets are less productive than desktop solution. Yes, smartphones and tablets have shorter life cycles. But mobile devices are booming and development is advancing quickly. Who knows where we'll be in a few years. MS better hold off on making Windows subscription based or they might push that development further than it would naturally have gone. A tablet/smartphone docking station may be the desktop of the future.

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xRadeon

Everyone that is complaining should get yourself to school! I got it for 4 years at 80.00 bucks due to University pricing! Hahaha suckers!

Or you could just pay a hundred dollars more a year and just get a technet or MSDN account and get everything Microsoft.

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markstrelecki

severally does not equal severely.

where are the editors and who reviews this stuff?

o-m-g

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chop_slap

I stay away from this smelly bullshit and have saved dozens of businesses many $thousands/year$ using Linux and OSS. MS can runs their wallets whatever way they want but aren't getting any help from me.

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dgrmouse

That they would even be able to attempt enforcing something like this speaks to how screwed up DRM has become.

Subscriptions for cloud-based professional software are always a bad idea. If your livelihood depends on being able to produce documents, spreadsheets, e-mails, whatever, then not having absolute control over when said software gets updated and so forth is just too big of a risk to take. This, too, is why Steam's general-purpose software sales are a very bad idea. Your mission critical VBS macro that creates form letters from a database source doens't work in this version? Tough!

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davelray

So Adobe does this, and I've heard no complaints from anyone about it. Microsoft turns around and does the exact same thing and everyone's all BOOOOO I'll NEVER do that! Besides, it's not all cloud based. You actually get the installed software on your computer for offline use. Personally, I see nothing wrong with it. As for anything "mission critical" I'm sure all the business will either stick with volume licensing, or work closely with Microsoft on "updating" so as to avoid that kind of problem from happening.

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Hey.That_Dude

No one's complaining because few people use it and those that do pirate it already. That and the free alternatives are no where near as good (unfortunately).

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Peanut Fox

I think it's a great idea for home users, but the pricing is way outta whack to make it appealing. At the current price I can't figure who the target is.

Also, screw the single install. I'll just keep using something else. Like G. Docs or Libre Office. Heck. Even old and busted Open Office.

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xRadeon

No, you have 5 copies. Mac or PC. Plus after 3 or 4 years a new version will be out, which you'll get free and when you look at it in that way your still paying for office at the normal price, just doing it in installments.
I believe they went this way to get money continuously rather than in huge dumps. Probably looks better on the books, but when it comes down to it we're still paying the same price as before..

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livebriand

Compared to things like Home and Student, I think it's more expensive. Not to mention that subscriptions mean you're paying for the upgrades whether you like it or not, which many otherwise wouldn't have purchased. (that, or you buy outright for several times more than you did before)

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I Jedi

As I am sure others feel, this is a step in the wrong direction for Microsoft. At a time when Apple and Linux are eating at their feet, when Bing! is being passed up by some unknown Russian search engine, when Windows 8 is considered the next Vista by the tech community, when Windows phones are rarely mentioned and Google and Apple are the dominant smartphone OSs, and Internet Explorer is now the default browser to a different browser, they need to be encouraging and rewarding customers, not punishing them. It is their programming, their money and their time that go into making these products, but by creating such restrictions such as is the case with Office 2013, they only encourage consumers to find other alternatives that offer better control over how a user may use the software. Microsoft, you need to quit pissing over the last areas of the market that you still control a vast majority, and concentrate on offering your users the best you can provide in both software and the ability to use that software.

No, I am no one important, I don't hold a degree in sales and marketing, but I am a tech consumer who follows technology closely and feel you are making a big mistake with your approach to software license and money payments.

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xRadeon

I fail to see how a price plan DOESN'T give customers choice. Look at it this way.
BEFORE:
You buy 400 dollars worth of office. You hate it and can't return to the store. You're stuck with it.
NOW:
You pay 100 bucks, hate it and only have to deal with it for a year.

See my point? Gives us more control over our money. If we don't want to pay for it, we don't have to. Before we were force to purchase it in full, wasting our money if we didn't like it.

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livebriand

Or this way.

Before: $150 for 3 PCs home & student. Or, $220 for 2 PCs home & business.

Now: $100/year for 5. After 3 years, this costs more, if you don't always upgrade. (not everyone does) Or, with 3 PCs, it costs more after only 1.5 years. Doesn't look like a great deal to me.

Or, compared to the business version, after a little over 2 years for 2 PCs this is more. Or after 4.5 years for 4 PCs it's more. Again, if you don't always upgrade, this ends up being more.

The perpetual licenses, meanwhile, are too much now no matter how you look at it? $140 for ONE PC instead of $150 for 3? Absurdity...

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markstrelecki

Your perspective is refreshing and I agree 100%.

Steve Ballmer: what the hell are you doing with that company?

Pray tell, what made you think the Start Menu was unused and unwanted?

A statistically irrelevant survey in some third world country?

This just keeps getting better all the time.

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cmfisher4

In the title, I think you mean severely, as in harsh, not severally, as in many. Also, all just another reason to use Google Docs.

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RUSENSITIVESWEETNESS

I'll start using pirated versions of the OS when it comes to that. Or switch to Linux.

Right now, they are trying to lure consumers with low subscription rates, but once people sign on, these prices will skyrocket. In a few years, you'll be shelling out $500-1000 a year to use Windows and its Office Suite.

Dickhead is leading Microsoft straight to Hell. I hope they enjoy the ride.

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JLloyd13

just use Libreoffice

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nsvander

F-Them, its my software, and I can do what I want with it. Just wait a week and there will be a hack or work around then they will be crying.

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davelray

No actually it's Microsoft's software and they can do anything they want with it.

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