Microsoft Packs in Free T-Mobile Hotspots With Select US Forbes Magazines

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someuid

What ever happened to Bill Gate's plans for offering internet access world-wide via satellites?

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whiteodian

Seems like a waste to me. I'm sure most of them will end up in the landfill. Most people have wifi now-adays.

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IronChef

If I found something that looks like that on my doorstep I'd think it was a bomb.

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aarcane

I'm interested to know what operating system the hotpoint runs. Is it powered by Windows Server 2012?

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PDX-1337

Why Forbes? Seems like an odd choice, why not Wired or Maximum PC?

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Jaeger_CDN

Since when has anything Microsoft done made sense, especially the past year or two??

They may have done Forbes because they wanted to try and prove their relevance in the enterprise office suite side of things again. They must be bleeding red in a lot of departments and their bread and butter was the Office side of business.

Granted mailing a wi-fi unit in today's paranoia may not have been the best plan, maybe they're taking marketing ideas from EA?

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The Mac

or cartoon network.

lol

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Plowman33

Yeah, I work in a secure government building where wi-fi devices are strictly prohibited. That was fun watching them scour the building looking for copies of this magazine once they realized the advertisement inside them.

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John Pombrio

Having spent a decade going into and out of a DOE site, I found their ability to prevent data transfers in and out to be marginal. A USB thumb stick could be hidden anywhere and having me open my toolbag just was not enough. I had access to computers where I could have brought my own backup tape (less size than a pack of cards) or even a whole 2.5 inch hard drive. With Linux root commands, very little electronic trail would have been left.
This site was hit by two security blowups, a missing backup tape (found behind a radiator) and a possible data breech by a foreign national.
Take a giant site with thousands of people and just try to make it electronically secure these days.

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Jasker

I agree about this magazine. A nuisance for certain. Along the lines of being able to bypass security measures you're missing a few key points. The GOV does research on all the members with the goal to determine the likelihood that they will/could be swayed to defect in any manner. In addition all security measures are a deterrent. Whether information, communication, or physical, they all have holes. They will always have holes. No security measure is unbeatable. A job has to be done and risks must be accepted. And of course humans enact these measures and humans are flawed.

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Jubei

Los Alamos?

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MrHasselblad

I've worked "somewhat North of Vegas" where the same general rules apply to any type of "wireless device". Sure it would not be difficult to try to get around being caught, but imagine the consequences of what happens when one does get caught - because guess what I've somewhat distantly observed exactly that happen.

When a fellow employee was caught; they were naturally fired, but not before being quite well examined by numerous federal agencies. In the end, they faced numerous federal charges and fines, lost their pension, and got searched beyond belief.

One would not believe the amount of resources the united states government has at it's disposal.

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