Microsoft Engineers Predicted the Failure of DRM Back in 2002

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Bullwinkle J Moose

due diligence

if they don't want their movies stolen, they should show the movie in theaters only!

The fact that they made DVD's or Blue Ray Disks means they are giving it away (it cannot be stolen)

It can only be stolen if they refuse to sell copies that can be copied

If they sell copies, then it can only be shared (not stolen)

If you bring a camcorder to the theater, THEN you are stealing

It's so simple

Get your crap off the Internet

If you sell it on the Internet, you just gave it away

It's YOUR fault!

Ban ALL copies online (even from the producer) and only then can you call it stealing

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jedisamurai

If there is DRM, it gets cracked and then pirated. If there is no DRM, it get pirated without the cracking delay which negatively affects sales.

Proposed solution: Release software with DRM, after software is cracked and pirated, release patch to remove DRM. Problem solved!

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bezerkus

No need for DRM if we continue to let them take dole it out from the clouds and willingly give up powerful home computing for dumb terminals (ie Surface, iPad, etc.)

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Dexter243

Any music you can find on youtube video is music you can download and use on your mp3 player buy sempley using a website named vid2mp3.com or you can just use ant downloader to download the vid then nero will automatic convert to wave wile making music cd or you can just convert the audio to mp3 it is very easy to find any music you want for free and all ways will be

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Dexter243

I have a hacked ver of win 7 ult 3 monts before it was even released and it still works today
i did buy a legal ver of win7 home prem after i test drove it for a wile but still today kids pc is using the hacked ver
but you know what i use on my non gaming computers :-) linux

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wolfing

I wish they had predicted the failure of Windows 8, maybe then they could have moved a chair in their office to start a chain of events that would create an alternate present where we received a real Windows OS upgrade

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Zanshi

Microsoft are a bunch of hypocrites. They say this, and then go about with a DRM-based Zune/Xbox music subscription service. They now have the Windows 8 Store for apps which you can't use on anything but Widows 8. It's crap they have the nerve to release this in 2002, then do a 180 a few years later.

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big_montana

Reading comprehension problem? This document was not an official MS position as if you could comprehend what you read, you would have noted that the engineer involved almost lost their jobs over this document, Trying reading it again and maybe, just maybe you may be able to glean a little more out of this time.

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chainsaw_007

Anything worth buying, I buy, otherwise I steal. It's not hard to get good quality stuff (music, movies, software, games) from bit-torrent but anything that is worth buying I will buy even if I could get it for free. I would like to support the developer so he can make more good sh!t ^_^

yes, I am a pirate, I do steal things that I feel are not worth buying. What I consider 'not worth buying', someone else might love (and hopefully he will pay) but is it wrong to steal (in a digital sense, not ACTUALLY GOING TO THE STORE AND STEALING SOMETHING)? I don't feel that it is. <-- this is a long discussion for another day perhaps.

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usernonfriendly

I feel that DRM's restrictions encourages pirating for the most part. I agree with Samjabr a few posts before me in that the DRM process increases the end cost of the products. Not only that, the distribution itself can up the cost in a middle man sort of way. DVDs costing $20+ and CD albums almost costing as much at video and music shops (sometimes regionally restricted and even withhold international availability)? It seems that DRMs are helping the distributors more than the creators. That said, I would like to refer to an experiment Louis C. K. did late last year. He independently produced and directly sold his comedy special "Live at the Beacon Theater" DRM free for a whopping $5 to download from his website on December 10th. Guess what happened? A mere twelve hours later, he had over 50,000 purchases resulting in a $250,000 earning, easily covering production cost and development of his website to distribute. Three days later, over 110,000 purchases were made. After 12 days, the sales hit the million dollar mark; remember this is DRM free. In his words, "This is less than I would have been paid by a large company to simply perform the show and let them sell it to you, but they would have charged you about $20 for the video. They would have given you an encrypted and regionally restricted video of limited value, and they would have owned your private information for their own use." I think companies that release any content, in this case media and such that could be shared, should follow this business model.

my apologies on the wall of text in advance

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Strangelove_424

More proof that Louis CK is a genius. Thanks for that.

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gothliciouz

i don't know but apple drm on their old 128 kbps m4a/m4v files are uncrackable, or am i misinformed?

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Justin.Kerr

Pretty sure DoubleTwist had Apple DRM down and out years ago on music files. The point of the article however, is to point out how ineffective DRM is in general. Even if Apple's DRM were uncrackable, the analoge loop hole would always exist, thus the Darknet would prevail.

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Strangelove_424

People only steal shit. I'm willing to pay money for a Beatles CD, and can't imagine wanting to replace my White Album with stolen, badly compressed files. Nor did I hesitate to buy the entire DVD set of Stanley Kubrick when that came out. Transformers on the other hand is begging to be stolen. Die Hard III is begging to be stolen. The feces that climbs the music charts (Bieber for example) is begging to be stolen. Now compound the shit content with nazi DRM, an implementation that makes people feel like they're renting not purchasing their content, or force them to sit through 30 minutes of commercials before they can watch a Blu Ray they paid actual money for, and you have a perfect recipe for piracy. If the entertainment industry wants people to value the work they produce, they should start to make art again instead of regurgitated commercial manure, and stop pissing on the few paying customers they have left.

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warptek2010

Excellent points but what really popped out at me in your post was:

" If the entertainment industry wants people to value the work they produce"

Then the entertainment industry needs to start to value the people they produce for. That is clearly not happening not only in the value for value segment of the business equation (it's not quite the same as in other industries) but they also treat what is supposed to be a valued customer as a potential criminal. Example: exactly for whose benefit is the FBI warning that is impossible to skip past on every commercially distributed DVD/Blu-ray? Surely, not for the customer that just purchased the disc for his own personal use. The criminal who illegally copies and distributes isn't going to give a shit about the FBI warning.

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profdlp

I agree with you. (And would like to point out that I either buy something or do without. I don't steal the dogcrap that my neighbor's mutt leaves on the side of his yard and I don't steal Justin Bieber "music".)

Music and film companies are finally finding out what their monopoly was worth to them and they don't like losing it. They need to realize that now that consumers have (legitimate) alternatives they won't pay a high premium for dreck. I'd prefer to listen to 90% of the stuff out there free over the radio or on a grainy YouTube music video (or not at all) rather than pay top dollar for it. The other 10% I'll cheerfully pay for.

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Hilarity

Everything Beatles is available as .flac lossless EAC properly tagged rips. Same what you want. As for Kubrick there are 10GB+ 1080p rips that are indistinguishable to the real Blu-Ray's. More or less what you want too.

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Strangelove_424

I’m sure there are high quality Beatles or Kubrick files out there, but for stuff that I’m a real fan of I like to have the inserts, cover art, and original files. A 1080p file can still be compressed compared to Blu Ray and have compression artifacts. I like gradients to be butter-smooth. But that’s not really my point. It’s more about the psychological aspect of owning something you respect and are passionate about, and feeling that you experienced it in its entirety.

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jason2393

So, you're saying it's okay to pirate something if you feel the creators didn't do a good enough job making it?

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Strangelove_424

Is that you, Jack Valenti? I made my comments on the relationship of quality to value quite clear. I'm not interested in paraphrasing those comments into an overly-simplified, unnecessarily moralized straw man.

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Samjabr

Actually, it is possible to create DRM that would be nearly un-crackable. Note, this does not mean it would not eventually get cracked. Rather, by the time it was cracked, the underlying product would likely be antiquated. Simple Example: You finally hack Windows 95 in 2012. Relatively useless accomplishment.

The reason why developers do not implement such cumbersome security features:
- Incredible resource intensive
- Would dramatically increase budgets and corresponding cost of product to end-user. Rationally, companies calculate the true lost revenue due to hacked products, versus the added cost of making it near un-crackable.
- With internet access almost ubiquitous to consumers, it makes sense to use protection in the form of verification with a host server in lieu of embedded DRM. (Seriously, try hacking Diablo 3)

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Hilarity

Diablo 3 has been hacked. The emulator is just not fully working yet. And for most games that sort of DRM makes zero sense.

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Nimrod

and then theres the fact that D3 completely sucks balls

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Andrew.Hodge

These last two articles ruffled my feathers a bit, so please bear with me for a moment while I wear my torch's keyboard out. I'm no expert, but from my point of view, physical media is the better answer to this problem of lost revenues than trying to take away a person's right to control their property. To be honest, I do feel sorry for the artists that are losing money to filesharing. They have every right to the proper control of the material that they have themselves created. That being said, if someone dangles something in front of me for free that would usually cost money, don't be surprised when I bite. The problem with the modern era is that, just like the four engineers said, it's impossible to stop these leaks from happening and in an industry with a single point of failure, once one song/game/movie/program is leaked, it's gone. People in the cooperate offices need to realize this and adapt to the modern world. They should embrace filesharing as a form of "sampling". When I find an MP3 of a song I like, I go out and buy the cd. If available, I get the vinyl (awesome little store in Vegas called zia records). I don't believe everyone else out there is like me, but there are other forms of music distribution other than CDs and vinyl, concerts being one; pick your favorite. It seems that the media industry is infatuated with cyberspace. They're slowly moving to a world where the only form of media is digital, and that's just wrong. There are two halves to this world, and I exist in both. I like to have some form of physical media as well as digital copies.

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Hilarity

Every single form of DRM has been and will be cracked. Its pointless. Doesn't matter how much effort you put into it. Someone will delight in breaking and shitting all over it.

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