Microsoft Abandons Planned Xbox One DRM, Used Games Policies; Won't Budge on Price

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dgrmouse

If it doesn't have a physical switch that disables it, I will continue believing that it can't be properly disabled.

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LatiosXT

All this desire to wanting the features previously mentioned boil down to this: I'm too half arsed to walk up and change the game disk.

I'm sure sharing the digital downloads thing would be nice, but I'm also pretty sure "family members" meant "10 other accounts on this machine", not "10 other Xbox's". If it was the latter in any case, Sony already does a lesser form of this on PS3. Just yesterday I logged in on my brother's PS3, downloaded some PSN games, and they worked just fine on other user accounts (as far as I know).

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riopato

The difference is you wouldn't have to download it and yes, you could have 100 Xbox Ones as long as you log in to your account. This is what is misunderstood about the DRM, the DRM is not on the box itself, the DRM is on the xbox live account which would have been needed.

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DannyD

It was, most definitely, 10 other Xbox's. The idea was that up to 10 other people would have access to your digital library and would be able to play those games. The only clarification that was needed was whether or not more than 1 person would be able to play that game at the same time on multiple consoles (I doubt this was the case, but still). As for your first comment, assuming Microsoft uses the same quality drives as they did in the 360, having to use a disk will mean owning multiple Xbox's (or at the very least sending them in for repair). I personally have owned 4 360's, 3 of which failed because of the disk drive. Not having to use a disk at all alleviates that problem altogether.

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nealtse

Since Microsith has blown the marketing conversation out of their ass, other people with more reasonable ideas on what consumers want have tried to step in and save it, and while they have softened the worse fears a lot, I've seen a lot of them mention that streamlining the DRM process "could" mean cheaper games. I have a very hard time believing that we're going to see Steam level of price drops on console markets.

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riopato

Subscription service for games ala Netflix streaming, xbox music/ video

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riopato

Subscription service for games ala Netflix streaming, xbox music/ video

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riopato

Subscription service for games ala Netflix streaming, xbox music/ video

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riopato

Subscription service for games ala Netflix streaming, xbox music/ video

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Renegade Knight

I think it would take that kind of price drop. The gaming market is only so big. Nobody magicly gets a bigger budget by blocking used games. Though they can make it so nobody can afford as many games as they used too. My opinion was that the MS model would make the big studios bigger and the indies would all be relegated to Android and iOS prices.

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DannyD

I agree with you, it probably wouldn't have happened. And even if it did lower the price, it wouldn't be by much (maybe $5). But the fact still remains that now, it absolutely, without-a-shadow-of-a-doubt, will not happen.

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Refuge88

Never would have happened, after the cost of development on games. Even AAA titles don't make a whole lot, its a market of very close margins. No way on earth they would lower their prices because used games weren't being sold anymore.

I know for sure that if I were CEO and games had been selling just fine at $59.99 in the US for YEARS, I would never lower the price because the Used game market crashed.

I would just take my mega bonus and go buy a country.

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SuperSATA

Pathetic. Ok, we know that Microsoft doesn't give a turd about consumer desires (because they made this lame deal in the first place). They're doing this because they know they're going to lose market share to Sony and Nintendo if they tried to pull this crap.

This is just so sad.

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hastyscorpion

We know exactly the opposite. They changed their minds because they would lose market share if they didn't.

They care about consumer desires because if they don't they will lose money. That is the way literally every business operates. Sony is not some saint of the games industry. They just had better focus grouping that told them that adding DRM would be bad for business.

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Arnulf

Nobody cares anymore - XBone costs $100 more, flip-flopping on DRM, inferior hardware ... they can keep it.

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DannyD

I agree with big_montana, at least partially. I wish they'd given us a choice. I, for one, didn't mind the package they were throwing at us. I have, and always will have (barring some catastrophe), internet access so requiring an online connection didn't bother me. I loved the idea that I could share games with my family. My father and brother are both avid Xbox players which would have saved me (and them) money in the long run. Furthermore, if developers/publishers were able to charge a fee for used games, the potential existed for the initial cost of games to drop because the developers/publishers wouldn't have quite the same risk of losing money through the sale of used games. Let's not forget that we now lose the ability to play games without having a disk in the drive. Again, I understand other people's concerns with requiring an internet connection....I just wish we had the option to choose. I would choose required internet anyday!

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Renegade Knight

They actually could make it work both ways. Put a serial number on the disk. IF you install it to your hard drive it now works like they said it would before the 180. If you don't, you have to have the disc in but you could give it to your buddy as well. It would be confusing buying on eBay and Amazon but the tech is there to allow this type of thing.

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big_montana

Microsoft may have heard. but they still did not listen. Instead of clarifying their reasoning behind this restrictive DRM policy, or finding a compromise, they packed up their stuff and left. Some of the compromises they could have come up with:

a monthly check for your game subscriptions instead of daily.
an opt-in/opt-out for people who don't have reliable internet, or internet at all (you can play single player games offline, but you can't share this title with any friends)
leave disc-based games the way they are today and kept all the digital download stuff eligible to be shared.

So, Microsoft decided if you don't want to play my game the way I want to play it, I'm going home! And I'm taking family sharing with me!

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USraging

Glad they changed their minds. I guess everyone will have to go buy a roll of electrical tape to cover the always on kinect cam when your not using it but as least that is workable.

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bloodgain

I'm sure there are third-party accessory makers working up elegant solutions to that problem right now, for the low, low, price of $19.99!

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RUSENSITIVESWEETNESS

Who would have thought that mocking your customers and treating them like criminals could be a bad thing?

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limitbreaker

It's still a bad deal, the privacy issues didn't go away and you're paying more for weaker hardware. Sony is still going to win this generation. Besides, the damage is already done with their reputation.

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Carlidan

It's not just hardware. It mostly depends on software and games. PS3 was more superior than Wii and Xbox 360 in hardware. And guess what, both kicked PS3 ass big time.

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Cregan89

The Xbox 360 actually had a more powerful GPU than the PS3. As a result most cross-platform games run at a higher resolution on the 360 than they do on the PS3.

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EJS1980

Your information is flat out incorrect. Whether you knew that already, is something else entirely...

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limitbreaker

I agree, but last generation Sony had incredibly convoluted hardware that developers couldn't bother to take advantage of. The story isn't the same now as Sony listened to developers this generation. :)

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Refuge88

While you do make a valid point I can tell you right now that every non-exclusive sony game will look identical to its brother on the XBONE as the PS4.

They are both easier to port to/from now which is great, but don't think for a second they are going to take the time to re0optimize the settings for an extra bit of memory. Not worth the money if nobody will miss those extra 5 rocks. (inaccurate example, but still same point)

This is shaping up to be just like last gens wars now.

It will be close, Now that its just a $100 difference, I think the major factor now will be more the online cummunity and the exclusives, which this year for XBONE both look AMAZING.

I'm still going PS4 though, I just can't afford that extra $100. That and all my BF3 buddies going to BF4 play on PS3. But if they subsidize the XBONE, or lower the price I might look into getting it as well later in the future.

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bloodgain

I develop software for a living, so I have to disagree. They will optimize for each console, guaranteed. Only the studios putting out bad or rushed games won't bother to optimize.

The reason is simple: any serious game house is going to test on both consoles. Testing is a long, expensive, but necessary process. There will be plenty of time to tweak, and it will be easier in this generation, so there simply isn't any reason NOT to optimize to take advantage of each console's abilities.

Additionally, the developers won't have to do anything extra to optimize in many cases. Optimization will happen at compile time, and/or be built into the software from the beginning. And many games run on third-party engines, which will already have been optimized.

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limitbreaker

You have a point on non exclusives but I think at the very least they'll improve on things like texture, resolution and perhaps frame rates or others similar improvements that are easy to implement.

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Refuge88

I think the only thing you will see is better frame rates/less stutter when playing at 4k resolutions in a best case scenario.

But this wouldn't be until the last quarter of their life cycles.

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ZX9RDan89

Nice to see that they can and did listen to what their consumers have to say.

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