Lenovo CEO Prefers the Term “PC Plus” to “Post-PC”

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Baer

I have a high end desktop, and I am going to build a new one soon, I have a notebook, a Surface tablet and a Kindle, I use them all. Yes, they have some overlap but they are all each ideal for different uses.

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whr4usa

+1

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Trooper_One

I wonder who keeps declaring that the desktop is dead.

Like many posters said here, there's a specific use for each of the computing devices. I have them all and I use each one in different scenario.

Lenovo is right, we're not in a 'post-PC' era but rather in a 'PC-Plus' era. I'm glad that such a company understands the needs of their users and that's why they're such a success in the PC/Business market!

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whr4usa

+1

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pastorbob

To quote my high school shop teacher, "There's a purpose for every tool and a tool for every purpose."

I don't believe it's an either/or situation but a both/and. e.g. My wife uses her tablet to read her eBooks, play Sudoku, check email, and connect with family on Facebook.

But she uses her desktop for spreadsheets, word processing, scrapbooking, photo editing and bill paying/budgeting all of which would be a pain (if not impossible) on her tablet.

In a nutshell, both tablets and PCs have a purpose. Granted, docking stations and such are blurring the lines between them somewhat. But I have yet to see a tablet with any docking station that can come close to giving us the same productivity potential that our desktops give us. I have three 21.5" HD monitors on my desktop system where I can have several apps open or my research software open with six different books displayed across the three. I also create and edit DVD videos.

I know, nothing new in what I've said here, but I had to put in my two cents worth. :-)

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whr4usa

your $0.02 continues to be worth $1 to my mind and $100 to my sanity compared to some people on here pastorbob!

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AFDozerman

Double post

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AFDozerman

It's all about what you like to do. For some, a tablet is plenty. For others, it doesn't come close. I have a feeling most of the people on this site are in the former category. You don't have to be a pro to need a lot of power. I think I'm a pretty average example.
I like to make videos a lot when me and buddies go shoot as well as hiking and some of the cooler aspects of my job. I stabilize shaky video, correct exposure, correct contrast, bla bla bla... The videos are usually shot in 1080p by a variety of devices from tablets and phones to legit cameras. This is all just for fun, too; not professional, not as some project, just showing the world and my family what I like to do.
I know that I'm not the only person like this, and video editing is just a small part of the equation. I also use Blender and Luxrender a lot as well as gaming and clean up pictures for people. All of this takes an assload of compute power. Between my old computer (server), my new computer, and my wife's MBP I have over 5 teraflops counting GPU compute and CPU compute put together, and I still could do with more. For that reason, I believe that the desktop is far, far from dead.

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whathuhitwasntme

I think its a bigger question to ask what a "pc" is any more?
The generation we have coming up now seem to think a pocket device is a computer just because it can post to facebook.
The apple crowd has always been about function more than innovation for the end user. They build it nail it shut an its never opened again until they toss it out for the next offering from Coopertino.
In my opinion, a real "PC" has always been about the ability to pull whatever parts I WANT, and build it the way I WANT. It's about it being custom to do the job I built it to do, is it for everybody? NO, but that's what David Dell and HP are for, computers for the masses.

To be completely honest we have not seen any earth shattering new technology in the computer game in a decade. They have virtually quit pushing for storage capacity now that drives exceed 4tb in one drive. The biggest bottlenecks these days are bandwidth of devices attached to the mainboard. Thus USB 3.0 and thunderbolt, but where is the earth shattering kaboom?(marvin Martian for the comically challenged)

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whr4usa

the apple crowd has always been about form not function - if they were about function even windows xp would have been considered to macintosh x86 lol.

otherwise '+1' to your first paragraph!

your last part is just wrong.

if you have not seen any earth-shattering new technology then you really havn't been paying attention to hardware and standards or have just been paying selective attention to some of MaxPC's reporting fails last year (:

considering 7.2KRPM disk are using 1TB spindles and we didn't even have terabyte drives until half a decade ago, then had a global recession followed by a traditional disk supply chain crisis while competing with flash memory more than ever and the industry transition to 4KB/sector and the prolonged compliance with 64-bit LBA I'm surprised storage has remained as commoditized as it has!

pci bandwidth definitely is the biggest bottleneck but usb 3.0 doesn't solve it and thunderbolt makes the crunch worse; read more

what we're really seeing is a 'failure' on the part of users, people in general, including enthusiasts, technicians too, to fully utilize or even know of the capabilities available to them i.e. virtualization is readily available to recent windows and linux clients with modern processors and minimal effort and solves all of the common end-user concerns like backups, using real windows apps on other devices, staying familiar with multiple interfaces if needed or security etc. but it scares people off, partly because hardware and OS fundamentals are so poorly explained by the technicians and enthusiasts whom suppoossedly know those things but nver bothered to learn them correct in the first place.

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pastorbob

+1

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Electrik

Post-PC? PC-plus? What nonsense. To me the whole argument is about processors, not the form. I predict smaller desktops with revolutionary new processors for the “green” crowd, not the demise of desktops altogether.

What about real production? Lap-tops, possibly? Is anybody honestly going to peck away on a 10" tablet all day? The trend in monitors is larger and better, and nobody is going to give up an actual keyboard for a tablet keyboard. Microwaves have higher-quality buttons.

I predict that Nvidia and possibly Samsung will start developing desktop processors. Intel is the only loser in this argument.

Intel-plus! Woot

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kevaskous

Rare i agree with posters on here, but you sir are very correct.

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Peanut Fox

If desktops get much smaller it'll become a question of "Why not just make this my smartphone that I can dock and use like a desktop?" Small form factor "green" desktops don't need to have a lot of processing power so a smartphone or tablet fits that role very well.

Pretty much every tablet can use a blue tooth keyboard, and lots of them have dock able units available. At that point typing on a tablet is no longer an issue and it's just a case of if the device has enough performance, and the right applications.

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Electrik

Well said, but the business and acedemic worlds require full MS apps, not available on Android devices, and iPads are not compatable.

It's an MS world, like it or not.

That leaves...wait for it...the Surface. Your devious plot would work on a Surface.

OMG I'm gonna get mugged for that comment...

:(

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Peanut Fox

I expect in the very near future we'll see x86 based handsets, and I also think that Microsoft's growth as a desktop platform is going to shrink, and other alternatives will start to make their way in. That's not to say that I think Windows will go away, I just don't expect it to be as ubiquitous as it has been for the past 20 years.

You're right about Surface (Pro only at the moment), but I think Microsoft is going to find it harder to offer their products the way they have been. Windows is going to have to figure out a way to go from paid software, to service. The onslaught of increasingly good low cost and free alternatives is going to push that outcome.

@Paper
I had high hopes for RT, but it's cost and it's lack of separation from full Windows 8 means it doesn't need to exist. In a pre Windows 8 world a touch based ARM centered Windows makes sense. But as it is RT is Windows 8 skim, and that's a hard sell.

EDIT: I think it should also be considered that ARM, and x86 technology have made a lot of headway. ARM has become more powerful, and x86 CPUs are requiring less power. Perhaps at one point an RT tablet made sense because x86 CPUs just needed to much power. But Intel has been able to do some amazing things with TDP, and I think that more than anything has made possible the x86 Windows Pro tablet.

In other words at one time an x86 Windows tablet would have been too bulky and power hungry, so the need for Windows on ARM made a lot of sense.

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Paper Jam

Gimme your wallet! :)

But seriously, I think the world is becoming less MS-centric every year. Their attempt at fusing a mobile OS with a desktop OS alienates some desktop users and IMO isn't very attractive for businesses and professionals. Thus opening the door for something new. I have no idea what, but it could happen.

Edit: And Surface RT is no better than Android or iOS. Surface Pro, on the other hand, could work. I really don't see the point of RT.

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whr4usa

how can you compare one device to two families of operating systems? seriously paper jam!

you dream, windows isn't going anywhere - it'll continue to be on top in marketshare until we've created an operating system open standards utopia ...and no it won't be because of linux, though it'll definitely help!!

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Paper Jam

I'm really trying to compare the RT platform to its two main competitors. Windows has been and is the dominant platform. No argument here. I just don't see the point of RT, and as you know, am not fond of the UI. But at least full fledged Windows 8 offers backwards comparability. RT looks like 8 but lacks the functionality of 8. And it really doesn't offer much outside of the UI to compete with Android and iOS in the mobile space. Most people don't consider tablets and smartphones to be PCs, but are they not personal computers? Yes, offering less in customization and power, but by far more personal than my desktop. Capable of social networking, email, video communications, light document editing, and expanding functionality with every generation. Just a few short years ago, these were all solely in the realm of the PC.

As to me saying MS has opened the door, I believe they have. It will take a long, long time for any competitor to pose a threat to Windows. But this radical new direction Windows is heading, coupled with lackluster sales and a sense of division in the market has made it possible for something new to emerge. I expect Apple to maintain their niche without a great deal of expansion, and Linux is too fragmented and still has something of a learning curve for the uninitiated. That said, Apple sales are rising, Ubuntu is becoming a more familiar name, and Google is attacking the laptop space with Chrome OS. Certainly Windows will remain the biggest player in business and enterprise, but the UI is a little kid friendly for professional applications.

Maybe a little competition will strengthen Microsoft's resolve, and Windows will get better. But I'm kinda looking forward to your open standards utopia.:)

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whr4usa

open standards utopia indeed!!

Microsoft has been a proven (if somewhat slow to initialize) innovator both technologically and business-wise
your last statement is much more accurate than your whole reply, if history repeats itself ever haha

lackluster sales? of 8? how?

"it really doesn't offer much outside of the UI to compete with Android and iOS in the mobile space" again, how? better in every technical area ...purely an education and presentation problem

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Paper Jam

Though MS has been innovative throughout its history, I think current smartphone sales have proven that slow initialization has nearly become too little, too late. This could be not so late, but like Blackberry, significant market share has slipped to near obscurity.

Lackluster sales of 8? According to MaxPC, it is behind the pace of Vista.

As for Windows RT and Phone 8 being technically better, I can't speak to what's happening under the hood, but as for form and function I prefer Android. I don't know if education and presentation will be enough to convert the hundreds of millions of entrenched iOS and Android users. I reiterate, RT and WP8 might be too little, too late.:)

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whr4usa

"According to MaxPC, it is behind the pace of Vista."

you obviously wern't actually thining when you read that article (which was a repost from another site) or have read any of the comments ...the short answer is 'wrong.'

I don't disagree with anything else you said ...though with the creaky codebase both android and ios are sitting on - it might be "too much too early" instead!

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