Latest Firefox Aurora Includes Web App Support

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gmvolk

I don't know about this whole thing. We're supposed to trust a browser, one of the most security prone applications around, to run other apps? I would rather have a stand-alone app do one thing very well than to have a web browser try to run many apps and worry about security. I wish firefox would jump off this "me too" bandwagon already. I stopped even trying chrome once they added the web app store. I won't touch IE, so I'll just have to hope someone creates a plugin to turn off this bug once it comes out, or stick with the previous version for as long as possible.

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Cregan89

Web browser's are actually debatabley the most secure applications in existence. It's first important to realize that the majority of web browser vulnerabilities are actually caused by plug-ins and not the browser itself (Flash, JavaRT, etc.). Then you have to realize that web browsers are also by far the most targeted applications in existence so naturally they have the largest number of discovered vulnerabilities. But with that being said, modern web browsers combined with modern security practices and continuous updates are extremely difficult to successfully compromise in the real-world (I believe Google Chrome has still only had one single discovered vulnerability which was completely unrealistic in real world use and has since been patched even before the bug was publicly released).

And now with HTML5 and web apps, web browser's have essentially become their own application frameworks, or in other words, operating systems. They are so advanced that Google actually has a web application OS in ChromeOS, Microsoft has built the HTML5 and JavaScript web application framework into Windows 8, Palm/HP's WebOS is also an HTML5/JavaScript OS, and Firefox is working on their own OS as well.

So now compare a web browser to any other operating system like Windows, Android, OSX, or any other Linux distro. In one of these classical operating systems, once you give an application the privilege to execute or install, that application is wide open to hack your system in any way it wants. The onus is on the user to deny execution privileges to malicious software. In contrast, web applications have a very strict API which makes it impossible to actually compromise the system unless an actual bug is taken advantage of.

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Refuge88

While I admire your confidence... I think it is a rather large leap to be comparing a web browser with an Operating System.

Just because they have HTML5 in common doesn't mean they are any where near the same league of scale, and or complexity.

Thats like saying my Hyaunai Elantra is the same thing as a Ferrari, because they both have an engine and burn gas.

And I think we both know THATS not the case.

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gmvolk

First point, Then you have to realize that web browsers are also by far the most targeted applications in existence so naturally they have the largest number of discovered vulnerabilities.

Second point, once you give an application the privilege to execute or install, that application is wide open to hack your system.

Therefore once you give a web browser, the most targeted application for discovering vulnerabilities, the power to execute and install other applications, your system is wide open to attack. Therefore you have agreed with what I have said.

From the Texas Department of Information Resources (ca 2009)...
"Traditionally, browser-based attacks originated from bad websites. However, due to poor security coding of web applications
or vulnerabilities in the software supporting web sites, attackers have recently been successful in compromising large numbers
of trusted web sites to deliver malicious payloads to unsuspecting visitors."

From Kaspersky Security Bulletin...
"The number of browser-based attacks in 2011 increased from 580,371,937 to 946,393,693"

From Mcafee...
"Web browsers are the critical platform for current and future business applications, and are equally the target of sophisticated web-borne malware attacks"

I could go on, but I will not trust a web app to be as secure as a non-web app.

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Refuge88

It is something simple your overlooking, but its not your fault its because they are using the same term for two different things.

By web apps they don't mean the apps in say google docs or skydrive or whatever they call it now.

They are referring to actual apps you download and install into the browser like an app on your phone, check out Chrome if you wanna see what they are and what their like.

Its basically just the toolbars of the future if you ask me. I wanna browse the web on my portal, not play angery birds on it. If I wanted to play angery birds I would go to the website...

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kamikaji

I would download the Aurora version, but I don't really want to get shot, so............

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Shalbatana

Sorry, maybe I'm out of the loop here. I'm a little confused as to what support needs to be added to a web browser for web app support.

I would hope a web browser can run web apps. Firefox runs google docs now, so what needs to be integrated/is the benefit of integration?

Anything that makes web stuff better is a good idea to me, so if anyone can clarify this it would be appreciated.

I'm sure there's just something simple I'm overlooking.

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