ISPs To Start Policing The Net More Actively At Government's, RIAA's Urging

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praack

I love the white house comment- who said the white house is in tune, checked out and has a clue?

In reality our president and the rest of his staff supports the business and not the freedom of the country

pretty strange huh? monitoring for our own good? guilty without a trial?

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win7fanboi

Fast Forward 10-20 years.... Everyone will be assumed guilty until proven innocent of (to name a few) :

- Being a terrorist.... let TSA agents molest you and your family or you can't get on the plane

- Pirate.... Install a monitoring software on your computers if you want internet access

- Criminal... Go ahead and sign up for "random" police raids voluntarily unless you want to be pegged as "person of interest" by the police

- List goes on and on

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axiomatic

If the ISP/RIAA were Alex Trebek

and

We citizens were Sean Connery

I think we'd all agree... "SUCK IT TREBEK."

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muelle

a friend's sister-in-law makes $65 hourly on the laptop. She has been laid off for 6 months but last month her pay was $19426 just working on the laptop for a few hours. Go to this web site and read more NuttyRich . com

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i enjoy your article. great job. keep it simple

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Engelsstaub

To me "RIAA" is merely an equalization-curve applied to vinyl LPs from the masters.

I don't like to defend people who think they're entitled to free music downloads "just because they can," but the (other) RIAA is becoming a bad joke that doesn't pay artists shit. So I'm conflicted.

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maxeeemum

I have to agree!

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Hilarity

*YAWN* Usenet with SSL and a VPN if you are really paranoid. Untouchable, max speed, gigantic amount of content stretching back 3.5yrs+ that is ever increasing. Want a 2009 rip? You'll get it. Untouchable. No reliance on other people or unreliable file lockers. Stop trying to stop piracy. You never will.

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maxeeemum

Maybe ISPs will change their minds if people just switch to another provider.

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dubcek

And yet after the president of the MPAA publicly admitted to the bribery of members of Congress and threatening them if they did not stay bribed nothing has been done but to blindly keep on doing what they are told.
When is he going to be held accountable for his activities which I consider much more serious than downloading an album or movie.

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warptek2010

Wouldn't it be hilarious if it turns out that all these measures that the RIAA and MPAA are implementing don't do a damn thing to their bottom line and the various industries continue to bleed money?

When you account for the almost endless greed of this industry in the form of high monthly payments and fees for cable, charges for ppv, blurays, dvd's, streaming, movie admissions, etc... no, no it's never that THEY ARE the problem. WE are the problem.

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HoopSpread

Problem with any of this is for example if 'anything'is on the information highway,this is akin to a random 'stop and search'. And again I dont believe a thing the government,or isps give themselves as rights-this is all being done w/o law.
RIAA,the government,and ISPs will do nothing more than aggregate user data,and make a preponderance of inhibiting,and prohibiting their interaction with applications,communication,and interaction.
The government by declaration has not by law given anybody anything said of these things. It only goes again to do for you what you (or they)cannot do for themselves. So in decoding,the perk,and fringe benifit of their own,and most likely not yours.
I got to give it to them,these passive post DHS babies are some real paranoid usefulls for government policy initiatives.With ISPs previewing themselves as 'information prophets'. Still the govy is confined to being 'information liberal',for every one but what the law has defined them to be.

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Ghost XFX

Cary Sherman...another Harvard grad. I'm so sick of these "know it all" Harvard grads. Time to burn that bastard to the ground....

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marasm

I had my internet shut off for about 12 hours because I torrented movie. Happened just last week. No warning, no letters, just bam no internet. Took them 24 hours to do it, but they did.

I have not torrented in years, and this is the last time I will be doing it. I will stick to normal downloading. Torrents are too easy to track.

My ISP is an offshoot of Cablevision. Great speeds, but damn they are watching traffic like hawks now.

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livebriand

Get a proxy off hidemyass.com first, or stick to HTTP downloads. For music, I use beemp3.com. For movies, I do google searching and often find them on random file sharing sites. For software, I look online for a crack or something, and use it with the trial for the manufacturer's website. For games, I also search random file sharing sites (sometimes, on youtube, you'll find a video with the download link). I haven't been caught so far (previously used AT&T, now Comcast).

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al360ex

Stick to Magnet links and you should be alright.
ThePirateBay started implementing it way back in 2009, but now it's the only way to torrent on their website.
Basically, the only thing you're downloading is a hash code and that makes it almost untraceable by media companies, unless they download the Magnet link themselves, then monitor each IP address individually while they are downloading the file. But they won't do that because it's too much work.

Here's a link if you want to learn more about magnet links : http://lifehacker.com/5875899/what-are-magnet-links-and-how-do-i-use-them-to-download-torrents

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marasm

It was a magnet link, and it was from the pirate bay. Dunno. Scared the crap out of me, though.

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Nahiyan

Traffic Encryption, anyone?

And torrents are really illegal, just torrents with pirated content..
But I recommend you continue.

/me has just started a piracy flame war.

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livebriand

I wonder - what if they see that you have encrypted torrent traffic, and punish you over it? It could've been copyrighted content or it could've been a linux distro (which is perfectly legal to torrent). In fact, I always use torrents for stuff like linux distros because it's usually faster than the regular HTTP download.

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RaptorJohnson

Not sure when we got the right to pirate people's livelihoods. Most folks seem pretty insistent that they have that right.

I may need to re-read the constitution.

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CaptainFabulous

When you do, please cite the part that grants the right to royalties for the things one creates.

Hint: it's not in there either.

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aferrara50

It actually is in article 1 §8 CL 8 "The Congress shall have power: ... To promote the progress of science and useful arts, by securing for limited times to authors and inventors the exclusive right to their respective writings and discoveries"

Many things that people claim as "rights" are not in the constitution. Most importantly of which is privacy, something that is can only be implicitly construed to exist in the const.

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gatorXXX

Me thinks the MPAA/RIAA are greedy SOB's BUT...some of the money made from "selling" content pays the artists thier royalties. That is how they get paid and make a living. This "living" provides you the content you listen to on your mp3 player, the movies you watch, or a combination thereof. If artists didn't get paid and quit doing what they do because, ya know, they have to eat or some shit, what would you listen/watch then? Your collection that you pirated over and over? I agree that the prices today are outrageous and need to be controlled but honestly, they wouldn't be doing what they are doing if it wasn't deemed a problem and the problem is more problematic than you think.

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Ghok

"If artists didn't get paid and quit doing what they do because, ya know, they have to eat or some shit, what would you listen/watch then?"

You really think that even if people were guaranteed they'd make NO MONEY being artists, they'd stop? Are you serious? Did musicians disappear when recording and broadcasting were invented? Do you think most musicians were excited about devices that got rid of the need for a band at every event that required music? The ability to record a performance once and use it indefinitely after that? Yeah, bet that went over really well. Yet there continued to be musicians and many thrived more than they ever had before. The same is happening with music and the internet, and you are just being sold a story being told to keep an outdated excessive industry afloat.

"but honestly, they wouldn't be doing what they are doing if it wasn't deemed a problem and the problem is more problematic than you think."

Like I said, don't believe everything you hear.

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Ghok

Intellectual property infringement has been around as long as the idea of intellectual property has been around. It's not as if people have suddenly started with the invention of the internet. These are very old issues.

There are many more people like myself who do believe in the necessity of intellectual property laws, but think the laws we have now are not what's best for consumers or content creators. It seems pretty clear to me that the harm caused by piracy is negligible in the grand scheme or things, or is at the very least incredibly overstated. It makes me kind of sick to see these media cartels get such special treatment.

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aarcane

we have a right to PRIVACY. To conduct our lives without fear of someone snooping on what we do. Especially if we do it in our own home.

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CaptainFabulous

BRING IT

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aarcane

Time to whip out the good ol' onion router again.

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0ly1r3m@1ns

fun fact people 1% of the population in the USA is in jail. so in other words 3million people are in the USA are currently in jail.

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dubcek

Just another blatant example of the MPAA/RIAA bribed US government doing what they're told to do regardless of the legality of it.

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silverblack

So illegally downloaded files, and legally purchased files downloaded from cloud storage are differentiated how exactly?

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Danthrax66

From my understanding which is what I saw on a post from a private tracker, is that this is just an official response to DMCA take down notices. So if verizon gets a DMCA because you go caught dling a movie on a public tracker then they do one of the new steps instead of just sending you the DMCA. So it isn't really deep packet inspection which would raise their cost like 5x what they are now it is just a system of responses to what was already taking place. If you stick to private trackers, get a seedbox, get a VPN, or use not torrents you should be fine. At least that is what I am hearing.

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win7fanboi

Police state of America

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stradric

Except, of course, it's the government's job to police copyright, not private industry. There is so much wrong with this "six strikes" nonsense. Mostly though, it's a slippery slope. It sets up legality for ISPs to deep monitor your online activity while also setting up legality for private industry to perform duties typically reserved for government -- all in the name of securing profits for movie and music execs.

If people sit back and let this happen (and you know they will), the next step will be to start monitoring your activity for "hatespeech" and "dangerous" content until eventually we're processing thought crime.

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kris79

Let's start by naming them for what they are - the government is the new Ministry of Peace, and the ISPs are the Ministry of Love. It's 1984 and the trademarks of the members of RIAA are looking down at us from their billboards, and we'll all be so happy while drinking our Victory gin... Oh shit! I think I just plagiarized something! There goes my internet.

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damicatz

I also wonder if, during the ISPs fight to combat DNS hijacking, they will go after ICE and the illegal unconstitutional domain seizures they keep doing.

That is, by definition, DNS hijacking. I also run my own DNS server for this reason.

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livebriand

Don't most ISPs hyjack invalid DNS requests, sending them to a stupid search page by default? That's why I don't use Comcast's DNS server, for instance.

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damicatz

This is why I encrypt all my internet traffic through overseas VPN tunnels.

It is definitely worth it to subscribe to a VPN service.

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win7fanboi

until they ask the VPN service to cooperate with them (read... show them what they want without asking for a warrant)

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Danthrax66

You missed an important word in his post... OVERSEAS the government can't control what isn't in their country (legally).

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compro01

Right. And Kim Dotcom was also overseas.

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RaptorJohnson

And Kim Dotcom was a crook making money by distributing content other people owned & created.
(not really a knock against your argument, but I still felt like mentioning it)

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