ISPs May be Preparing Harsh File Sharing Penalties Backed by Entertainment Industry

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level1paladin

Fuck this.  :-)

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D9ptgyA0

Given that ISPs don't keep track of IP addresses very well, this is not good.  This happened to me and many others.  And before the trolls get up on how IP addresses change blah blah...please read the posts in the forum at this link:

http://forums.comcast.com/t5/Security-and-Anti-Virus/Comcast-Reporting-Erroneous-IP-Information-for-Copyright/td-p/891005

Very

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bling581

"The main issue as described by critics of such plans is that there is no due process. Accusations by content owners are treated as true, and users may be falsely cut off from Internet services."

This is the major flaw with this plan and I don't see them coming up with an extremely accurate system to verify the person is breaking the rule. Even a small number of false bans would create a lot of bad PR and backlash from the community.

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kris79

Seems what we have here is - imminent failure to communicate. Let's be clear, the RIAA knows that its flow of money IN vastly exceeds its payments OUT to buy protection. This is just good business in a mafia, thuggery sort of way. The number of palms that are getting greased these days is staggering as the Lords of the Ka-Ching buy politicians, judges, and apparently CEOs of ISPs. Hopefully, the rebels among us will continue to fight the good fight against government's protection scheme for the benefit of the few against the many. I'm pissed that the bourgeoisie seem to think that the internet is only for them to control, and by doing that, they get to control us.

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frizzly

I miss the good old days when the internet was only used by geeks and we all got along together

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yu119995

I wonder what anon and lulz think about this.

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RUSENSITIVESWEETNESS

If they were more than criminals themselves, they would target the RIAA and never let up.

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Gman3968

They aren't that crafty. They just want their 15 mintues of fame. I am so sick of all the BS that these groups cause. The RIAA sucks they just don't get it we are going to share whether the laws are in place or not. People are going to be controled by a group of Nazi-esque regime of fat greedy so called executives.

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alabasterdragon

With a accusation like this:

http://www.maximumpc.com/article/news/ftc_expected_begin_wide_antitrust_investigation_google

and this article, I guess we better take Google out to the parking lot and bash it in the head with a boot until it's dead. They are ACUSED of wrong doing, they MUST be guilty, otherwise no one would have acused them! Well isn't that what the ISPs and entertainment idustry are arguing with people who fileshare?!

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alabasterdragon

So they are conspiring to punish people that have not actually commited a crime? What if AT&T was forced to close it's doors because someone accuses them of vilating monopoly laws?!! Regardless of your opinion of file sharing copy protected files, you have to be a complete liberal/socialist/communist moron to think that it's a good idea to punish the accused an not just the convicted. I don't see a problem of limiting or banning convicted copy right violators from file sharing, but I have a HUGH problem with punishing anyone that is accused. Hell I can claim that every single person that reads this website is doing that. That wouldn't make it so, but under this stupid idea that would mean these ISPs would block everyone from visiting this site, or maybe from getting online at all. What's next blocking internet access to every political party you don't like. Wouldn't that violate first amendment rights of US citizens!?! This is a good example of what left wing thinking gets you when you follow it all the way to the end and not just a few feet and quit.

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Ghok

Maybe you can explain how punishing someone without a conviction is "left wing thinking"?

There is no ideology there. It's neither left or right.

Seriously, read a book, or at least a Wikipedia page.

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tornato7

Will this block people who are file sharing legal files, like sending a bunch of photos you took to a friend by bittorrent, or will those people be branded pirates too?

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alabasterdragon

Don't you know that in these people minds, EVERYONE that shares files, even the ones they personally own the copyright to, are dirty rotten theives. Pretty much the only good file sharer is a dead one. Talk about vial hatered run amoke!

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Joji

What about Canada? Does the same rules apply here?

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Neufeldt2002

You can bet that if the Mafiaa can get ISP's in the states to do this, they will then focus their attention on Canada. Although they are probably all ready trying. What gets me though is up until just the other week, my ISP had how long it would take to download a movie or mp3 using it's service on their main product page.

Edit: You must remember though that Canadian courts love due process and proof, something which the Mafiaa hates.

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frizzly

you do kow that you can buy mp3's and movies for download. right? or dont you pay for them?

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Neufeldt2002

Yes I am aware of that fact. And yes, I pay for them. Just that many don't.

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Eoraptor

I especially love this

""or their access limited to just the top 200 websites online.""

In other words, "We will control what you see and hear." So, everyone in american could be unilaterally declared an illegal file swapper for having viewed a rickroll, and the ISPs can then shunt you to the websites they choose, all nice and legal like.

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Fruguy

What will probably happen is that the ISPs will put this type of thing in their EULA. That way, nobody really reads about what will happen if they download illegal stuff.

You could say that this is an extension of bandwidth caps that most of the major ISPs have put into effect.

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Holly Golightly

Hmm, Cablevision's Optimum was not mentioned... So maybe I am safe for now. Limit people to the top 200 sites eh? Well, there is an extention that can be used to download music and videos on YouTube and FaceBook. Clearly these two are on the top 200. So AT&T, Verizon and Comcast have just experienced an epic fail. The RIAA will never win this war.

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avenger48

Don't forget Google cached copies of pages!

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theabsinthehare

This will only stop casual file sharers, the cousins, friends, significant others, aunts and uncles of computer literate people who were taught how to bittorrent but don't understand how it works. The real pirates will just go farther underground and use more secure means to prevent their ISPs from knowing they're downloading copyrighted files.

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mseyf

It would be interesting to see what 'perks' the entertainment industry is offering in exchange for the ISP's 'cooperation'. I believe the ISPs listed also offer entertainment over their lines to the customer, so are the ISPs getting access to the entertainment at a reduced price if the ISPs 'cooperate'? Enable the ISPs to create a Netfix competitor?

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bloodgain

This won't stop any pirate with the minimal knowledge required to turn on IP filtering and transport encryption.  Both are built into nearly every client, and IP blacklists are easy to come by and updated frequently.  Advanced pirates, especially those who are profiting from their piracy, use even more indirection, such as an offsite seedbox and/or special proxies (sometimes even private ones).

Take away Internet access, and just see how much worse things get.  The true pirates will have a field day, because their profits will just go up.  If this starts costing ISPs too much, it won't last, though.  They won't cut into their own profits just to make the RIAA/MPAA happy.

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RUSENSITIVESWEETNESS

Those blocklists are for crap. The RIAA is contracting out companies that use residential IP addresses to monitor who is sharing what torrents. You can run PeerBlock all you want, but download the wrong file, and you will get a letter from your ISP is as little as two days.

Obfuscation is the key. That, and news groups.

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bloodgain

+1 on news groups

I know a few people who have gone back to news groups, but I mostly stream from Netflix these days.

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rawrnomnom

wardrive?

 

the problem as i see it is... 

 

if your internet connection is used for file sharing then you get penalized... so if you have a friend come over and he forgets to shut down a client, you get penalized...

I personally have a laptop that has a windows 7 liscence, but didnt come with a disk, so rather than pay $ to company x, i torrented the correct iso to reload my os... how can they prove that somone is actually using the torrent for the wrong purpose? its likley that they are, but if you own a liscence..... 

I'm fortunate enough to live in an area where there are multiple ISPs available, and i can say that if companies adopt policies like this i will keep switching until i run out of ISPs to switch to... which could take a while. 

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TerribleToaster

"So it seems the starts may be aligning for the RIAA and MPAA at long last."

Do you mean "stars"?

 

 

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Sounds like a good time for a class action lawsuit. Denying due process seems like a good enough reason.

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Marthian

this doesn't seem too good. if one person gets the household in trouble, everyone suffers...

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TerribleToaster

How about one person in a university? Or a corporation? Even a government building.

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vig1lant3

Generally speaking universities, corporations, and government entities don't allow access to sites blacklisted for illegal file sharing anyway, so that's mostly a non-issue.

What is at stake here is the issue of the legality of the means the ISP's are suggesting.  Essentially this is unfolding as a solution that circumvents due process, and I've heard no mention of appeals.  In other words it would seem that they can simply deny service on a whim based on virtually nothing.

What tools will the ISP's provide for customers to protect themselves and monitor their own networks?  Will the end user be privy to the IP activity that the ISP bases their descisions on?  Will the procurement of supporting documentation from the ISP be possible, and will it enable customers to argue a point of innocence? 

When will LulzSec and Anonymous do something useful with their time, and focus on these few evil empires for the good of true net neutrality everywhere?

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TerribleToaster

I can actually guarantee this is not universally true.

Blacklists are pretty easy to get around most of the time, but regardless:

Yes, they all try to prevent it, but how they do it at my university is to monitor all uploads for illegal content. People have easily bypassed this by disabling upload and only downloading.

At an old job of mine for the government, the person who was there before me was fired because he was doing illegal file sharing over the government network. It took them 6 months to catch him, and it might have been going on before that.

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vig1lant3

Of course it's not universally true.  That would be why I said generally speaking....

I am currently enrolled at two universities in NC that both block downloads of even just torrent links, and I got out of the Army in 2007.  During my enlisted time I had five duty stations on the east coast (those are the only I still frequent), all of which now block all file sharing on govt operated networks.

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