Intel Updates Sandy Bridge Situation, Green Lights Select Shipments

9

Comments

+ Add a Comment
avatar

radiomn

While it is unfortunate that the chipset has an issue on the non 6Gig ports, I for one will wait for a 100% INTEL solution. Lest we forget that they are competitors. And Intel Processors and Intel Chipsets are superior to the competition. Sorry AMD fanboys but Microsoft doesn't model their O/S on anything by AMD, and quite likely... they never will.  

avatar

Obsidian

So, what's happened here is that Intel is calling the bluff/ability of consumers to hold them in any way accountable for faulty products.

MaximumPC consumers don't buy a board with 6 to 10 SATA connections, printed as such on the box; only to have 4 of them not function as expected. This work around, as suggested to use ports 0/1 and/or move the drives to other headers, isn't a solution at all. Assuming a low failure rate might amount to only several single-digit percentage of failures for motherboard manufacturers. But for those affected, the product is now known to be faulty, and can not be sold as having as many functional SATA ports.

False advertising.

This is a huge potential public relations failure for Intel. Even if it affects very few people. You'd think that for a company of their caliber they'd want to do right by the consumers of their products. If it affects as small a number as they claim a few million dollars thrown at the problem (replace motherboards, help resellers) would go a LONG way to turn a bad PR deal into a huge good-will campaign. Bean counters probably don't see things that way.

Anecdotally it's unfortunate for me because I am in the first stages of building and planning my next PC, the purchase is to happen within the next 4 months. I'd hate to have this issue affect my decision to build on a certain platform. But now I'm looking into alternatives to the Intel processors. Before, that line of decision making would have not been up for debate.

avatar

win7fanboi

+1 ... I was planning a build as well. Really wish that AMD steps up their game and capitalizes on Intel's boo-boo.

avatar

D00dlavy

Oh yeah, sign me up for this wonky s__t.

*Is happy he's in the AMD camp.  Dragon FTW.*

avatar

win7fanboi

Boo... Hiss! Hi folks, in today's news Intel lets greed get the best of them again by 'letting' the OEM makers continue making certain configurations using Sandy Bridge. As a byproduct it also 'lets' them sell the defective CPUs instead of having to fix all of them. Win (Intel) - Win (OEMs) - Lose (Customers).

 

Imagine a year from now people buying/selling used laptops. How do you know which are laptops impacted... but.. but you may never see the issue since you won't change your laptop config. What about upgrades. OEMs hopefully will change the product names after they start receiving the defect free parts and make accessories available for them.

 

Intel. Fail.

avatar

patrickmaher

There are some OEM builds that do not solder all of the SATA connectors to the motherboard. Some only have 2 SATA ports that would likely be the SATA 6Gb/s ports. This is more common on laptops but also can be the case on lower end desktops. Although probably not as common on desktops as it was when PATA was still included on boards.

It would be physically impossible to use the SATA 3Gb/s ports in these cases and this is likely the type of build that Intel is allowing the OEMs to resume selling. Intel has been controlling the situation and it's unlikely that they would allow OEMs to resume shipping boards with SATA 3Gb/s ports, that they will have to pay to replace later.

avatar

logicmaster2003

"Intel 6-series chipset in PC system configurations that are not impacted by the design issue"

What brand and model of motherboards are not impacted ?

 

avatar

Paul_Lilly

They're all impacted, but if you configure a system to use only SATA ports 0/1, or plop a SATA PCI-E add-in card, then you sidestep the issue.

avatar

majorsuave

Ah! the 4 "Portsmen" of the Apocalypse.

2012 is near indeed.

Log in to MaximumPC directly or log in using Facebook

Forgot your username or password?
Click here for help.

Login with Facebook
Log in using Facebook to share comments and articles easily with your Facebook feed.