Intel’s 3D Transistor: Faster, Cooler, Smaller

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gr3atl10n

why not 1000 gate transistors and why keep making the consumers (pay to)test market this stuff? We pay through the nose to get super addicted to tech that falls short in 90 days (or the warranty period) of the new tech.

Cmon Intel, listen to consumers. Give us the pure man. We don't deserve it.

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TMc51

"I have a hard time believing that Intel will introduce LGA2011 and snuff it out nine months later."

 

Seriously? I seen this coming miles away.

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Kinetic

Looks like I'll roll with bulldozer this year (maybe) and switch to intel next year. You'd think with all the advancements intel makes they could stick with a chipset for a couple months.

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Caboose

"I have a hard time believing that Intel will introduce LGA2011 and snuff it out nine months later."

I believe that that is something Intel will do. Look at their previous track record. Launch a new chip and socket, and then the next announcement is that its being ended. Intel has more sockets and CPUs than any other manufacturer it seems. Not content on settling on just a couple and running them for a while, they kill off parts way too fast!

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Ilander

Dangit, Ivy Bridge will require a new chipset???  I though ticks were mostly just die shrinks!  I mean, penryn ran reasonably well on P35 chipsets.

Gah, I knew I should have waited for Bulldozer.  I know this will kill on performance, but there's little that I hate more than having to buy a new motherboard once a year, and having to explain to the spouse that I have to reinstall Windows, and her programs will have to be reinstalled, and the whole thing will take weeks to fully transition.

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tony2tonez

Im pist i dumped Intel Stock for ARM. Only thing i could hope for is that next gen of windows works really well on ARM chips. All well i guess we will see in the long run. 

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Eoraptor

I, too am curious what this means for LGA2011 and the performance/enthusiast chipset... will we concievably see something called a Core i9 which will support the quad memory (32 gigabytes+ of ram anyone?), 8 core hyper-threaded processor on a motherboard with 4 full 16x lanes, or even 24x/32x PCIe 3.0 lanes? 

Or will Intel make the same boneheaded moves it did in the early P4 days and go all RD Ram on us? Introducing a technically superior but unpopular chipset and socket that prices itself out of the market almost immediately.

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iceman08

so my current p67 board won't work with this at all? or will this change?

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Eoraptor

correct, just as with the Core 2's life span, different chip archetectures may use the same physical connector socket, but will require a different underlying chipset to let them communicate with the motherboard.(ask any laptop modder about this, it makes it a pain to find which Core2 you can plug into your lappy among the hundred or so out there)

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iceman08

lame. but, that's business I guess. still, I like the idea of more performance for less power. maaybe intel can factor in low price somehow haha

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schneider1492

a die shrink usually lowers manufacturing cost because you can get more chips out of one wafer of silicon. such a great die shrink may allow up to 60% more usable chips per die, im not sure how this will work with tri-gate tho as building in three dimensions may raise cost.

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chipmunkofdoom2

Not in the AMD camp. They've had 2 major sockets over the past few years, AM2 and AM3. Backward (and forward) compatibility has been something they've really done well on.

 

What they haven't done well on, however, is innovating. For so long, AMD has been reactive instead of proactive to Intel's products and technology. This certainly isn't the death of AMD, but it's just one more area where they're losing ground.

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Caboose

I'd say more backwards compatibility. You can't put an AM2+ CPU in to an AM3 board as it lacks the DDR3 controller, etc. But an AM3 CPU has a DDR2 controller in it so thats why they work in AM2+ boards.

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