Inexpensive Power Outlet Supports SuperSpeed USB 3.0

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d3v

I thought this was for a home network running off USB. That would have been much more useful than USB recharge outlets.

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rahlquist

I've already gotten mine. Just havent had the time to install it. Anyone want some pix of the back?

 

 

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Caboose

yes

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rahlquist

Here you go.

 

http://pcsites.com/ebay/2011-01-19%2018.41.21.jpg

http://pcsites.com/ebay/2011-01-19%2018.41.33.jpg

http://pcsites.com/ebay/2011-01-19%2018.41.40.jpg

http://pcsites.com/ebay/2011-01-19%2018.41.46.jpg

 

The unit is very solid and overall has a decent build quality. The faceplate and the outlet itself appear to be Leviton made.

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BlazePC

Double post

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deadsenator

I think I may be prone to purchasing one or two of these for outlets that are already strategically located (counter top) to plug in USB devices.  USB extenders would be needed for many of the other (lower) outlets in my home.

I did notice that they are waiting for UL approval still.  I sent them a question about power leeching and the email bounced.  Not a good sign.

Also, we really need a switch to turn off individual plugs at the plug.  Do they sell this in the US?  In NZ last year, I noticed all home plugs had switches to turn them off.  I really liked this feature.  Would love to have some here in the States.

 

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rahlquist

I believe they have gotten UL approval now right before they started shipping. Their website is notoriously not up to date. If you look carefully you will find different current ratings.

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deadsenator

I saw your pics from above.  Is there any info on power leeching?

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frizzly

The iPad probobly wasnt mentioned becouse it comes with both a USB and a standard plug much like the kindle does.

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jlh304

This is the reply I got from fastmac about the usb and an iPad:

The U-Socket can charge one ipad at the same rate as it's wall
charger, or 2 ipads at half speed.

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knexkid

My understanding is that AC to DC adapters will use a trickle of electricity when plugged into an outlet and even if no device is plugged into the charger. Will these outlets do the same? I'm assuming these outlets basically have a 120V AC to the ~5V DC transformer.  Will these outlets also slowly use power with no devices plugged into them just like a normal AC adapter would?

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ShyLinuxGuy

I wouldn't trust these devices--the USB 2.0 charging ports isn't very far from a 120-volt line. Barring electrical interference issues, one little nudge of the 120v wire short-circuiting to the USB charging circuitry would crispify anything plugged into that USB port.

Powerline networking is also dangerous. Can't plug them into a surge protector, and they have little protection, if any, on their own. If a big storm comes in or a rookie linesman screws up the power lines on your block, or the device simply fails? One extra crispy motherboard, coming right up!

*I notice the USB port is on the neutral side, not the hot side, but I do not know what the innards of this device looks like. Even so, that 120v terminal is not TOO comfortably far.

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BlazePC

Unfounded!

Designed right, these should be no more risky than plugging a USB charger directly into the socket.

And as far as your side comment about Powerline networking is concerned, poppy-cock!  I've been using them for years without a signal failure; and I've gone through several version upgrades along the way.  I've got 5 units spread throughout the house and have lived in the lightning storm prone front range region of Colorado.  Sure I'm only "one" guy but you'd read and hear about the issues in mass if Powerline networking was truly SO risky.  BTW, most folks that are overly concerned about "spikes" traveling down physical cables tend to feed their ethernet, and power, through UPS/surge strip facilities which pose no disruption/hindrance to connectivity when introduced between a Powerline module and the end-line, client device.  I'm referring to the RJ45/data line protection...

As far as the OP is concerned, these are a great innovation and will sell well.  Very cool!

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ShyLinuxGuy

There has been a few cases with powerline networking being unsafe for the computer. Of course, it doesn't put 120 volts through the Ethernet cable, but the powerline networking device can fail and do precisely that (fry your equipment). I actually knew someone who had to replace an iMac, a networked printer, a desktop PC and the hub that connected the devices together (which was then connected to the powerline adapter) because the powerline adapter had somehow short-circuited or failed otherwise. The classic surge through the power line was ruled out because there was a newer APC UPS in use, which still worked. Testing the adapter, it was found that voltage had leaked through and was ending up out of the Ethernet jack on the device. Of course, the company (Belkin, I think) refused to replace $3,500 worth of equipment,  but had the audacity to replace the faulty device with a new one. It happens, and I'm not too comfortable with the concept. Wireless N with security is a much more safer alternative hardware-wise than powerline networking, and more flexible. The router costs about $60, cards cost about $20, so you'd spend the same amount on a powerline networking kit as you would on a Wireless N network. 

Back to the USB ports on this outlet: $20, the cost of this device, kind of scares me as you would think that this device would be $50+. I realize that some devices charge through a USB-based DC charger, but you can plug those DC chargers into a surge protector (and you should). Just charge your devices through your PC...? Besides, although it's not difficult to replace an outlet, it is time consuming (run down to the basement, cut the breakers, run back up, rip the old outlet in, put the new outlet...). Multiply that by around 5 when it is much easier (and safer) to just rely on your PC to charge the devices, provided it isn't underpowered by a $10 power supply.

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BlazePC

You've got to be kidding right?

Let's see some engineering evalution of either of these two designs (OP USB outlet or Powerline devices) and some relevant statistical data to support your suppositions.  Running scared doesn't make for a well substantiated case bro.  Neither does your cost analysis...

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sotoa

This is a pretty nifty idea. I might spring for a couple.

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jstegall02

I have been watching their website for over a year, waiting for the same product to be released, although it was a USB 2.0 version until now.  The same message has been on the product page the entire time, waiting for final approval, with the expected ship time adjusted as time passes.  I will be happy to purchase a couple of these things, but, I don't anticipate it actually releasing anytime soon.  Hopefully I'm wrong. 

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Caboose

I'm surprised something like this hasn't been around longer!

When I get my house, I'm replacing all outlets with these!

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jlh304

This is a good idea.  Although I wounder if they should be marked as only being a power source.  I could see some people trying to network things through usb with them.  But I could see one being put in place for the kitchen counter.

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Neufeldt2002

I like the idea. Instead of having to turn on a pc just to charge something, just plug it in, brilliant. No longer would I have mp3 players hanging off of my computer.

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VoodooChicken

Most smartphones and very recent mp3 players currently have a USB-wall charger included. This eliminates the step of an adapter, which can be expensive and easy to lose on its own.

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Caboose

Most motherboards today support powering USB devices even if the PC is off. Most, not all. At least all the PCs I've built do...

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