How to Download Without Installing Malware

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kirank

There are also sites like downloadxing.com and findsoft.org which don't have installers like cnet or softonic which download malware to your pc.

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MarleneLuis15

If you think David`s story is exceptional..., a month back my auntie's boy friend basically brought home $6292 putting in seventeen hours a week from their apartment and their roomate's mother-in-law`s neighbour did this for 9-months and made more than $6292 in their spare time from a computer. use the guide on this web-site, Bow6.com

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seanpyke

After Cnet's "Buzz Out Loud" died I never went back there.

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arsenal123

nice article, thanks for sharing

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shortalay

When I was first starting up my Youtube channel I used the program Hmelyoff Labs VHScrCap that you guys mentioned in "Livestream Your Games to the Web" by David Murphy August 2011 magazine issue. You guys mentioned in the article yourself that the site was always down and to download it on a safe site I trusted, well I was not exactly careful, (and I didn't know about computers as much as I know now) so I just clicked on the first site I found. Well of course that is a big no-no, but it gets worse, I was so excited to start livestreaming to my Twitch.tv account I clicked accept on EVERTHING! Literary all 20 offers, and that's a round up, it was really 23, and when I was finished the web browser I was using had a whole set of toolbars, multiple search engines competing for dominance, I had a cat wallpaper for some reason, a ton of virus popped up when I ran Norton scan, (why didn't it inform me about this?) and the program was recording everything so sluggish that the early videos I have up using it are boring and recorded no sound, not even my mike! The worst part though is the computer broke, it crashed and the hard drive filled up with spam, and also it was my cousins computer! He was allowing me to use it and went to the movies with his friends, when he came back he wanted to know why he couldn't log into his windows account anymore...Sorry cuz!

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Salohcin

Blueridge appguard . Blueridge. com/index.php/products/appguard/consumer

Choose 2 step verification WHENEVER AVAILABLE.

Update everything ALWAYS.

Get ahold of or build a utm (application enabled router) for nat, virus spyware blocked at the gate and so much more.
untangle .com/. sophos .com/en-us/products/free-tools/sophos-utm-home-edition.aspx

Virus blocker of your choice on every pc same brand across LAN for easy maintenance .

Always make java click to enable never fully trusted.

Read sophos naked security or watch Hak5 from time to time :)

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Hey.That_Dude

I have my Ghostery add on in firefox set to kill anything double click related. I only ever see one or two download buttons. And when the latter situation occurs i hover, check the link, and tell ghostery to kill the next dumb@ss who though they'd be cute. Downloads just piss me off now a days.

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igetsin

Forget download sites. Even Oracle tries to install McAfee with Java updates (apparently they have lost all faith in Java security). And Adobe does it too with their software.

But it is extremely effective trick. I've lost track of the number of people who had computers full of junk simply by blindly agreeing on installing every single option. I've had people with about 7 different toolbars never mind a ton of other "plug-ins" installed wondering why their 3-yr old Dell came to a screeching halt.

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glpeter90

Good article. It points out all the hoops that you have to jump through to download something from CNET. Exactly the reason I quit going to their site. There was a time I would recommend CNET and would visit to see if some new useful utility had been added to their collection. But not anymore. I don't mind ads on a site, but when a site try's to TRICK you into downloading ad ware and spam ware and toolbars then they cease to be a legitimate website. That really describes CNET now. They are not a legitimate website.

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PCWolf

It's so bad, that even ZoneLabs, maker of Zone Alarm, have started to use this sneaky tactic to trick its users into Installing it's Toolbar, & Making it your default home page & Search Engine, while hiding the skip offers in tiny text.

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Nixon

Didn't see that VTzilla browser extension, that's pretty awesome!
Installed it just today, testing out sites for fun with it.

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D00dlavy

Who the frak in their right mind downloads anything from Softpedia? I went years thinking that site was a malware site before someone convinced me it was semi-legit. Still, though, screw that site and screw those multiple download buttons. I don't trust it and I don't like the design.

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Bullwinkle J Moose

BUT, what if you could just click to download the correct version of the software you want....And get all the free malware without all those extra spam links?

Would that be called progress....?

or, the Pirate Bay?

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pastorbob

+1

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dgrmouse

One of the most serious issues with all modern software is that the publishers feel that it is their prerogative to collect continuing analytical information. I remember very real public outrage when Real Media and other jukebox software got busted uploading playlists and such - but now, every application developer thinks it's their vested privilege to "phone" home.

We shouldn't even be judging malicious software based on what it HAS done, but rather what the EULA permits it to do. It's a HUGE failing of the tech media sector that crazy software licenses aren't exposed and ridiculed publicly. If some popular software product's EULA requires the right to scan any file on your hard drive and to upload ambiguously defined usage information, it should be blasted in every review. I even saw a license the other day (for Warframe) that specifically prohibited users from examining or altering data contained in system RAM in use by the game. WTF! This is akin to prohibiting a car owner from opening the hood of their automobile, and it is just one more symptom of corporate greed impinging on personal freedoms.

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SpecNode

Who downloads stuff from Cnet anyway, full of useless crap, just download software you need directly from developers.

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PCWolf

Problem with this idea of yours is that Many Developers send you to CNET now, with more doing the same thing every day.

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dedgar

I can tell when one of the ladies of the house have been on my computer. Extra tools bars.

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genghiskhen

CNETs credibility is shot.

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Cube

God I hate fake download buttons and pages are the worst designed pages ever made it is just random crap thrown all over the screen.

I do this all the time for 3d models people put up as free and they host them on the worst websites of all time in a million parts with the damn captchas I spend all day doing it in small chunks to get what I need.

Or i spend like 20 minutes looking for the file link from a wall of text like on some pages (mostly programmer pages since they can not make a website with large clear content design) and wonder if this is the new version or not when i do find it since it is all over the place.

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ZenLord422

For me Filehippo and Majorgeeks. However today I'm mostly a Linux user. Linuxmint-laptop (Ubuntu remix) and Manjaro-Desktop (an Arch remix)

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somethingelse

+1 for Linux

Been using Gentoo and Debian for over 6 years now and haven't had a single virus on either one. And I do browse lot's of torrent and 18+ that are have all kinds of pop ups, malware and remote execution scripts...but all of them target windows users :P Gotta love small market share :D

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Inxanity

This article only makes me miss Fileplanet.

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BikerDon

If it ain't at Major Geeks, I don't need it. Used to use download.com, many years ago. Got a nasty infection once, never been back. If someone routes me there, I don't want their software.

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TheMissingPiece

I use adblock plus. It usually helps get rid of the fake download links. But don't worry! I disable it on websites I support!

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PCWolf

Disabling Adblockers on supported websites is a great thing, except when those Ads are the VERY ANNOYING ones, such as the "Starts talking if you roll mouse pointer over it" or the even more annoying ones, like those on Yahoo, where they hide a large SWF Alpha over the front page, tricking you into clicking it so that it covers almost the entire screen with an animated Ad. While I love to support my favorite Sites, I refuse to Support Annoying or Deceptive Advertising tactics.

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BrandNewJesus

Funny you mention that, I just did a fresh install and still had adblock enabled on this site.

All good now.

PS> After all the BS hoops to jump through not knowing what crapware is associated with it....I asked myself, Is this really worth the matrix screensaver.

The answer was...I just did a clean install of windows.

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BikerDon

Useless Creations has a great Matrix screensaver. I been using it for several years now. Costs $5, but it looks real good and has some nice options. I think there is a free version too.

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Paul_Lilly

Glad to hear you disable AdBlock Plus on sites you support, which hopefully includes this one. Although I have passed along to management several alternative methods other than ads to generate revenue, but it's always the same response: "Paul, for the umpteempth time, it's not even remotely legal to even ask our interns to do that, let alone have them actually do it!"

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dgrmouse

Haha. That's funny.

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bautrey

And thats why I never use CNET for downloads...

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GenMasterB

I agree. Years ago CNET was ok for downloads. It's a shame they turned to crooked ways of dealing with download clients. I don't like to push laws, but something needs to be done to not allow US sites to blatantly push spyware in a way it confuses the clients.. I'm in IT and I have to remove so many of those "download helpers & Toolbars" that it's become commonplace. only way this will be fixed is if a Senator or Congressman accidentally installs some spyware from CNET...

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warptek2010

On the one hand I agree. How many friggin toolbars do we need? (Me personally - ZERO). On the other hand, do we really want the government getting involved? Their neck deep in everyone's business as it is.

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dgrmouse

Yes, we want the government involved. It should be illegal to misrepresent a product or service, period.

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Nixon

I usually read the little URL bar showing where the button leads me.
That was back before I used any ad blocking extensions though.

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Leo Scott

Time for Anonymous to DDOS the sites like Download.com that are trying to fool users with their bogus links.

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supakeepa

I've recently started recommending people who I've seen click yes for all installs to start using ninite. It skips a lot of this.

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jnite

I basically do the same thing. I love ninite. It saves so much time when installing all of the common software I install on computers. I actually just go ahead and use ninite to install or update (if it doesn't have a built in update option) my own software. It's faster than going through junk like the stuff mentioned here.

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Damnlogin

Allmyapps works pretty good also.

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jimmthang

Fake download links, I think that's my new pet peeve!

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wumpus

New?

What I miss is that google won't point you anywhere else when you want to download this type of file.

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