How Often Do You Replace Your PC?

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gritz

My current system is a PK5PRO with Q6600 & GTX 8800 and O/C to 4 Ghz built for daily use and for FSX running XP that I built in April of 2008.  I replaced it's boot drive with an OCZ Vertex 2 last Nov which has probably extended this system's life by a couple of years.  It is super snappy and faster than my i7 920 O/C FSX system with GTX 285, VelociRaptor and Vista (ughhhh).  I have no need to upgrade, even if the i5 2600K was half price. XP is stable, competent and runs everything I throw at it ....  why waste money on new if there is no benefit??

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Gary1847

Since my first PC, an IBM with a 12 inch screen, 2 floppies,4 mhz, 64k ram in the 80's, I have gone for the latest and greatest bleading edge components. I cahnge parts about every 4 to 8 months. This year went from i7 920 to water cooled i7 950 and in about 4 weeks will jump to an EVGA SR-2 and 2 6 core Xeons, got aproval from household banker:)

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j0101011

I upgrade when my wallet stops crying and lets me pull some cash away from it. lol

I play with xp, vista, 7, ubuntu installing and running them for months at a time, re installing with something else. Keep it intresting eh 

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Ashen

I am finally upgrading my old P4 3.4 I built in January of 2005.  Before that, I ran my P3 500 I built in February of 1999 (6 years).   This have not been my sole machines, but have been my primary systems.  Right now, I am having a hard time justifying the upgrade, even with the affordable 2600K, due to my A/W QX9300 Laptop.

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andrewc513

I do yearly builds, and yes there's a logical reason. A few years back, I bought and built a nice high-end system for around $1200. Around the same time in the following year, I would build another $1200 computer with way faster parts, selling the old one for either the same $1200 or $1100. I live in a college town, so it's very easy to do that.

So I perpetually stay on the latest hardware while either breaking even or spending a mere $100 anually.

Software reloads? Nah, no sweat. Acronis Universal Restore FTW. And somewhere in there was a 7 upgrade along the way.

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JohnP

I basically have an unlimited budget.

When there is a 10% or more speed advantage to the latest CPU WITH O/C, I upgrade. Sandy Bridge threw a whole mess of upgrades as I have 5 computers to upgrade, 3 for me and my two sons, and two HTPC. I didn't bother with upgrading the HTPC as they do not have games running one them. Graphics cards is also a no brainer. I have three NV 580s and two lower end ATI for the HTPCs. No reason to SLI as I do not see any need with "only" a 27' Dell IPS screen and two Dell 24 inchers for my sons.

Next go round will be Sandy Bridge with 6 or 8 cores. Graphics cards? Nothing on the horizon. HTPCs with get a sandy bridge with built in graphics once the reviews come out.

Nothing like having 3 i7- 920 mobos with 6 Gb of RAM and 3 ATI 5870s just sitting in my pile of leftovers.

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bling581

Since high school I've upgraded twice now, almost exactly 4 years for each system. I know I should upgrade once in a while but I've been bad at that. I spend 3-4k and then sit on it for 4 years and it usually lasts just fine. Towards the last year or so I have to start turning the graphics on new games way down but they're still playable and look good enough.

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Wingzero_x

When do I up grade? Nearly every time you assholes tell me there's something better out!

Seriously though, within the last 6 years I've built and reconfigured at least 12 systems, and have parts on the way for a new HTPC. Truthfully, I find building systems relaxing, and fun. I paint the cases and such. Most my systems are mid range, and there are a lot of pass me downs, between the systems. I mostly give away, my older systems to family, and friends. As of rightnow Ihave an i7 875K, 12GB memory, ATI 5770, SSD, and it's fast. So till somebody makes an affordable processor with 8 or more physical cores...

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redrum6114

I buy a uber nice graphics card then in about a year and a half I buy mobo, cpu and ram. I cycle every year and a half between the two. I don't need alot of storage so I buy hdd as they fail. I just bought a psu way more than I need that'll last me for a very long time. I have the original Antec 900 so I won't need case for a long time. 

Basically every 3 years I have new graphics, cpu, mobo, and ram. PSU, hdd, case, and opticals carry on until something goes wrong.

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Wonko33

I haven't bought a "new" computers since 2003. Though the only original part I have left from that computer is the floppy drive( I keep it because i lost the little front plastic panel and I don't want a hole in the front of my case, i'm not sure it's plugged in)

I go through my update cycle on a regular basis: video card, then mobo-cpu-ram, then video card again etc. I change my hard drives when I find good sales, power supply when wattage gets too high and the rest when it fails.

I "trickle down" all my old parts to my wife's computer then to my son then to my nephew. I like it because I feel I get my money's worth out of the hardware

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drcrazyrich

I GET TO PLAY WITH OTHER COMPUTERS ALL THE TIME ,LOL .MOSTLY OTHERS OLD BROKEN ONES .BUT AS FOR MY OWN P2 233 ,P4 1.5 GHZ ,ATHOLON 4200 ( WHICH STARTED OUT 2GB RAM @ 533 ,GIGABITE BOARD ATI 2600XT ,250 PATA SEAGATE HDD ) NOW I HAVE 2 LAPTOPS ONE P4 3.2GHZ 160GB SATA HDD ,THE OTHER COMPAQ CENTRINO 1.7 3GB RAM 250GB HDD.

MY DESK TOP HAS BEEN A WORK IN PROGRESS NEW CASES HDDS CPU RAM MOBO ETC.SO NOW I HAVE A AM2+/3 ASUS MOBO 4GB DDR2 800MHZ RAM RAPTOR BOOT HDD(FORMALLY WITH 2 RAID 0 TIL 1 DIED) AND SEAGATE 1TB STORAGE HDD AMD PHNM2 955 WITH THE OLD HD200XT GPU  (WHICH I HOPE TO REPLACE THIS YR W/6000 SERIES CARD)SOME MORE RAM AND A SSD BOOT DRIVE ARE FUTURE UPGRADES :) AND ITS ALL IN A LAN BOX !!  JUST GOT THE QUAD AND A SECOND MONITOR SO NO TOTAL REPLACEMENT FOR QUITE A FEW YRS NOW ....

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ShyLinuxGuy

Once every 3-4 years, about average. I'm on my fourth computer. My first was an ancient Macintosh SE, I had that around 4th grade. Then I got the old family PC when it was replaced, a Gateway with a Pentium III, then a Dell with a Pentium 4 when we upgraded to a new PC again. After that one I built my own computer in back 9th grade, which had an Athlon 64, which I replaced late last year (I am graduating this year). I decided to use Linux (Fedora at the time) when XP gave up on the old Gateway. Now, I use Ubuntu and Windows 7 and have a few VMs in Virtualbox.

I don't know if I want to replace my current PC, with its Regor Athlon II @ 3.0 GHz, 2x 500GB striped array and 4 GB of DDR3 memory. I'm not a gamer type of person, so this is more than enough for me, for now.

I might want to replace my laptop, which is almost a year, within the next year though. It's held up well, but the AMD v-series is painful. Thought about upgrading the CPU, but its socket (s1g4) has very limited choices for upgrading.

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wester71

I upgrade as needed,proven by benchmarking.Crapware is the killer,you are what you eat and your pc is the same.It is what you feed it.I have 2 machines I upgrade when it is logical.My amd machine is a black edition am2+ quad core.My intel is a i7 920.I can overclock til the cows come home and have not found an unplayable game on either system on max settings.fps' may differ but not enough to sniffle about.Keep yer pc tuned like a big block camaro and even the older stuff runs just fine.:)

 

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wester71

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al360ex

In my case, my upgrade path is planned up to 2013. I usually do minor upgrades every year, and a major one every two years.

For example, this summer (2011), I'll upgrade to triple 580s from dual 285s.

Around the beggening of 2012, I'll upgrade to watercooling my GPUs and CPU.

Next summer (2012), I'll upgrade to Sandy Bridge E (LGA 2011), that hopefully will have had the 22 nm die shrink. If not, I might wait a little bit more for that to happen. I currently have a Core i7 970. That means I'll have to upgrade my motherboard, CPU and RAM. I'll probably change SSD too. I might go for a RevoDrive X3. I currently have a Vertex 2 Extended.

In the summer of 2013, I'll upgrade to Nvidia Maxwell, probably a triple GPU solution too.

Soo that's it...everything laid out and planned !

al360ex

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tornato7

I only get a new/upgrade exiting computer when a game or program comes out that my computer can't play. This hasn't happened in a while tho. Stupid crysis 2. If they had kept the same graphics but made it run much slower, pc enthusiats would be more impressed. I swear.

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kixofmyg0t

Hell yeah. Iswear you could screw with the engine and make it horriably inefficient like Crysis 1(not changing anything to make it look any better, just to slow it down) to where dual GTX 580's can only muster <10FPS and everyone will be like

ZOMFGROFLOLBBQ!!!! DEEZ R TEH BESTEST GRAPHICKS LIKE EVUR!!!!!!!! BEHOLD PATHETIC CONSOLE OWNERS DA POWER OF CRYSIS 2!!!!¡¡¡¡¡!!!!¡¡¡¡¡

Oh and you have to make sure the engine checks to see if you have DX11 installed, but wouldnt actually NEED DX11. That way you could say its a DX11 game. Which, as we all KNOW....MUST mean its a better game then.

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Marsel

build a new one and sell it about every 3-4 months, always either make money or break even to always have the newest hardware

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RiderofDark

They gave numbers from the survey without giving out the questions. Which means that Crucial could have (and probably did) manipulate the questions to be in their favor.

 

Edit: I'm due for a new computer, but I'm waiting for the big shows to see what's new.

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RUSENSITIVESWEETNESS

1982> Texas Instruments TI-99/4A

1983> Apple IIe

1991> 286

1991> 386 (about a week later)

1997> P2

1998> some kind of Athlon

2003> P4

I think it's time for another computer....

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level1paladin

I generally upgrade SOMETHING about every year.  This year it was to a nvidia 470.  I expect a motherboard and processor upgrade in the next 2 years.  Still running an i7-920 from a few years ago and really don't see myself having to upgrade for a good time still.

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fellowleo

About once every 4 years. In about 15 years, I went from a Pentium 90 to a Pentium II 333 to a Athalon 64 3000+ to a Pentium i7 930. I don't expect to build a new machine for at least 2 more years when Directx 11 games become the only game in town.

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Marthian

I only tend to replace what I have on my computer around March and December (when I get money). Granted I do not have a good wage (I'm 17, whudya expect?) but I do try to keep my computer as fast as possible.

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maleficarus™

I upgrade every 2.5 years give or take. I am running a E8400 dual core@3.6GHz, 4GB ram with a GTX460 video card all wrapped up on W7 64bit. All the games I play like BFBC2 and I play in 1680x1050 max details smooth frames! I will be playing BF3 and for that I plan on just tossing in a 3GHz quad core and be good to go for another year or so...

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whathuhitwasntme

satchboy

not only do 99% of the readers here know HOW MUCH ram is in their PC

I will also bet they know how much the motherboard supports so they dont waste money on stuff they cant use!

we are not exactly your typical pc users

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praetor_alpha

For about 2.5 years, I was rocking a C2Q9300, 8gb DDR2, and a GTX 280. Then I started having gfxical issues last November. Since I was never really happy with that 9300, I waited until January and hopped on the Sandy Bridge bus hoping to fix things. I'm now using a 2600 (nonK), 16gb DDR3, and a GTX 285. My old parts (minus GTX 280) are now my server.

So I guess I'm getting into the habit of cycling my machines from desktop to server duties, with lifetimes of 5+ years.

The best way to speed up an old machine is to put Linux on it. I put it on my mom's machine, she noticed the speed improvement right away. Since she only checks mail, browses the web, plays solitare, and occasionally prints/scans, it's great and the 'experiment' has gone exceptionally well.

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Ridnarhtim

I'm somewhat new to this, since I only just built my own computer for the first time. However, my last one lasted about 4 years before it really needed replacing without any upgrades. I'm hoping to make this one last quite a bit longer than that.

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Atomike

I'm still rocking a Q6600 processor and a 8800 GTS Video card. And I can play every single game, without exception, that the "bleeding edge" gaming enthusiasts can play. And they look mostly the same. The fact is that gaming PC requirements have not risen dramatically over the past 5 years. If you could play the original Crysis, you can still play everything being released today. Everything. Seems like a big, big waste of money to upgrade more than once every 4 years.

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illusionslayer

Are you running on a crt? Because I can definetly tell the difference between everything-turned-down-dx9-at-800x600 and everything-maxed-dx11-at-7680x4800.

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Atomike

I don't think you understand what a CRT is. CRTs usually have a better appearance than flat-panel technology. And you are completely exaggerating the quality difference. I bet if you sat down at my machine, you would likely not notice the difference. You think you would, but you most likely would not unless you did a side-by-side comparison.

I bet you can also tell the difference between FLAC and 512 mp3.

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illusionslayer

My CRTs look like shit next to my LCDs

I cannot tell the differrence between FLAC and 512 rips since I'm not an audiophile and can't produce enough cash to have a sound system that would allow me to be.

I know I was blowing things out of proportion. It was to make the point that just because you can run Crysis on High at low Res doesn't mean your hardware is perfect and spending any more money is a waste of money.

Thanks for assuming I'm an elitist, btw.

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kixofmyg0t

I agree, if you can run Crysis 1 then you can run anything today. Then again my most current laptop(Hp DV7 circa 2009) laughed at me for wanting to play Crysis:Warhead. I had negative frames per second. In fact it just wrote me a IOU for all the frames leading to the title screen. 

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ScytheNoire

I get upgrades as new tech reaches the "must have" status (such as SSD a while ago). But a full system upgrade happens every two or three video card cycles. So sitting on a ATI 5xxx card now, waiting for the next generation to happen before getting a whole new system (ram/mobo/video/cpu).

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Satchboy

If half the respondents don't know how much RAM is in their systems then Crucial surveyed the wrong people for this poll.

I'm sure that 99% of MPC members know how much RAM is in their system. ;)

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Shini

 

Get the itch every 6 mounths to upgrade, and try to wait 2 gens for a compelete rebliud. 

 

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burntham77

On average, about once every two years I do a system rebuild, which means new motherboard and CPU. Other upgrades happen in between. Years ago when I was in college, I would always buy budget parts, but that meant that every six months or so I was wanting something new. Now that I buy parts that are a step or two under "high end" I find that my desire for upgrades are lessened, and my overall PC experience is far better than it was during the budget buy days.

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CaptainFabulous

Usually about every 3 years or so, tho I'll often have incremental upgrades along the way such as a video card.

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qhoa1385

Though there some truths to the fact that PC components slowed down over time, but it's the softwares getting more and more complex that makes the PC seem to slow down

And also lacks of knowledge, most people i've worked with don't even know how to defrag, or at least Empty trash often... last PC i fixed, got a 120GB of trash still in the bin and 40%+ fragmented hard drive, also tons of duplicates due to unorganized, so they keep copy and paste 1 file from 1 place to another and another...

also people need to read while installing programs, especially freewares, because of all the craps included like Virus Scanners, useless toolbars

and also it's the manufactures' fault, at least in the past, like Dell, their older PC model cases is barely ventilated that after a few months of lightly usage dust built up and completely cover all holes, there was only 2 fans, power supply fan, and CPU fan, there was no air intake or exhaust fans, so the system slowly fries itself over time... at least now they put an 80mm fan sucking hot air out of the case, but yet remove the CPU fan... i hate fixing Dell or HP (prefer HP over Dell) most of the causes are usually due to lack of drivers or simply just lots and lots of dust (either due to lack of knowledge about dust ruining component or just simply because the case(older models) was difficult to crack open)

Though RAM can improve performance, but sticking a new 32GB of RAM (IF ANY CHANCE POSSIBLE lol) to a P4 system running windows Vista (YES, it's Vista lol), with 40%+ Fragmented Hard drive, dated drivers, and the CPU is running at 80*C Idle is not gonna speed it up by any chance...

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mikeart03a

Yeah, I'm pretty much due for a complete overhaul myself of my core system. Hard to believe I'm still running on an Athlon 64 X2 5800+ with an nVidia 8500 GT.

Planned upgrade this summer: New Proc, New Mainboard, New Videocard, New Memory. I can reuse the rest of my parts (Audio card, TV Tuner, Bluray drive, HDD). Nothing too crazy either, think I'll think with midrange parts as I'm no hardcore gamer.

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p47riot

Right there with you, Mike, on a Socket 939 Athlon X2 4800+.  Amazing how well a properly built system will stand the test of time.  I built mine back in Summer 2005, and started out with Nvidia 7800GT, 2GB DDR400, 250GB Drive and XP Pro 64.  Since then, I've been able to piece in some cheap upgrades from ebay or craigslist to keep it hummin along.  Think I've finally milked this girl for all she's worth--SLI'd Nvidia 9800GTX's, 2 Raptor drives, 4GB DDR400 and W7 Pro 64 and oc'd stable at 2.9ghz.  It'll run anything I give it at 1920x1080 with settings on high (Crysis takes a little tweaking but I don't sacrifice much detail).

Would I like to replace it? Sure-- especially after reading that article yesterday about the multi-monitor setup in portrait mode and the type of specs needed to run games at those ridonkulous resolutions.  Even though I can't really afford to plunk down $2500 on parts for a new uber rig right now (excluding the 3 30" monitors that would make my gaming dreams come true) , I have to chuckle when I think of how my 6 year old system could probably still smoke most of the stuff on the shelf at Best Buy right now.

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mikeart03a

Well, can't say I've gone that far in terms of upgrades. Mostly just upgraded my RAM to 4GB and upped the hard drive capacity from 500gb to 1.5 tb.

I built this thing in 2007, so it's done its time. I have a socket AM2 Athlon, so i can dump it another board later on if I choose to.

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Corfy

I was rebuilding my system every three years or so, but that was before my wife and I bought a house (which put us on a rather strict budget that we are still following). Since then, I've only managed to rebuild my home system once (that was back in 2007, I believe). But to be honest, my system is running fine. I did upgrade the harddrive not too long ago, but as far as memory, processor, video and sound cards, for what I use it for, I'm good for a few years yet (barring system failure). Of course, the fact I don't run Windows probably helps that considerably (I first installed Linux as a dual-boot on my computer in early 2005... when I rebuilt my computer in 2007, I never bothered to put Windows on it).

Would I like to rebuild my computer? Sure, I wouldn't be on this site if I didn't. But other things take financial priority right now, and with the performance I'm getting with my current system, I can't justify the cost right now.

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Baer

I teach computer Maint and use as a volenteer and I find that crapware is the biggest issue with regard to slowdowns. Some of the biggest villans are add in toolbars, all kinds of garbage that runs at start up and Apple stuff put in with iTunes (Bonjour service, Qtask running at start up and the apple updater which will just add the garbage back). My experience is the Bonjour service is a particlally bad actor on a P C.

As for build cycles. I tend to do a major upgrade every year, something. For example last year it was an SSD as my boot drive and this year is was replacing my GTX 285 with a pair of GTX 580's. When it is time to replace the MOBO due to a new chipset that is usually when I do a full rebuild. When I do that I start from scratch with a new case and my existing computer (usually a powerful beast still) goes to my Wife :-)

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Neufeldt2002

As with the other posters here, I agree that the main reason for slow down is an old install of Windows, etc. Myself, I build from scratch on average about every 3 - 4 yrs. I would love to do it more often, but seeing as that I collect disability, it is unrealistic to do so. Every 3 - 4 yrs, is when I can convince my wife to chip-in on the build so I can still do things on the computer. Otherwise I upgrade as I need new parts due to faulty ones.

Please make publish to facebook opt-in, not opt-out.

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Ulrich

I get a nice cutting edge processor, and a fairly upgradable box. I buy upgrades untill the processor is no longer cutting it. Then I start the process over. I'm running a i7 920 is about 2 years old, and going strong.

 

As far as the non-tech savy... most the time thier PC is poluted with junk... and have tons of useless crap booting up on start up. They don't know how to make simple upgrades, and don't know how to do simple house cleaning. Most of the time they just need to do some basic things to get the old PC running like new... instead of buying a new one. I've extended the life of many friends and relitives PC's... and taught them some basic things to help them maintain the PC.

 

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Phrish

I seem to time my builds lately on a 5 year cycle to coincide with Elder Scroll releases. =) Need to make sure I can play.

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legacy2013

<p>Usually I'll do a new build every four years or so. My current computer is currently 4 years old and has only the orginial motherboard and CPU in it, so I do incremental updates to keep myself running the latest and greatest. When I do build a new PC I buy completely new parts, which I am currently in the process of doing :)</p>

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Phrish

I seem to time my builds lately on a 5 year cycle to coincide with Elder Scroll releases. =) Need to make sure I can play.

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wlballplayer

I upgrade when its going to be for double the performance. I currently have a AMD Athlon II x4 635 2.9 GHZ OC'd to 3.5GHZ processor. I will not be upgrading it until there is an 8 core available, which from the sound of it could be in the next couple of years. As for video card its the same deal I currently have a xfx 5770 which can run any game at normal settings over 60FPS. When its time to upgrade I will either get a crossfire motherboard and get another 5770 or just get a single GPU with dual GPU's on it. For now I am satisfied with my build and I will not need to upgrade hopefully for another year or two. I believe that small performance improvements are a waste of money. Definitely since most programs still don't use all four cores.


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illusionslayer

Doubling the number of cores =/= doubling the power. For instance the i7-960 has 4 cores but scores nearly twice as well as the athlon ii x4 and the i7-990x has but 50% more cores and nearly triples the performance.

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