Firefox 9 Now Final and Available for Download

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Dartht33bagger

I thought we were suppose to see a x64 release with 8?  Then I heard it was with 9?  When in the hell are we going to get an official x64 release of Firefox?

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win7fanboi

I don't mind them coming up with new versions quickly but they need to stop copying chrome. They used to update lot less frequently until chrome started getting ahead in the version numbers. Also, just because chrome has a built in pdf reader doesn't mean FF needs to get one.

Stick to your core competencies guys. Else you will be a similar but slower, less secure facsimile of chrome.

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Shalbatana

I do love FF, but in my experience I'm still having issues with version 8. If version 9 is mainly about bug fixes, is it really a "new" version? just call it 8.5 like they used to.

This whole big rush to have the same big (or bigger) version number as the competition is dumb, and most of us can see right through it. All these companies just need to stop.

Anyway, I hope 9 fixes my issues.

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Cregan89

Contrary to most people's beliefs, Mozilla isn't increasing version numbers to compete with Chrome's version numbers. It has nothing to do with that. That's why Mozilla has said that they actually plan on hiding the version number in FireFox in the near future, because they're tired of people who have no development knowledge complaining.

The version numbers are increasing quicker because of the Rapid Release Schedule paradigm, and how it relates to version control software (the software that manages all of the developers code changes, commiting specific code changes to specific versions, making sure that two developers can't make changes to the same piece of code at the same time, tracking bugs and their corresponding fixes, and making sure that new code that relies on other code isn't committed until that other code is committed first, and many other things). It makes the whole development process quicker and more streamlined because very rarely do you have to worry about 'minor' upgrades and patches. Instead, after each release, the dev team picks specific features based on priority, stability, and estimated time to completion and schedules those specific features for the next release, while other features that rank behind are scheduled for a future release. It's quick, streamlined, simple, improves overall code quality and stability, makes it easier to track bugs, and gets features and fixes out quicker.

It's just a number. What the hell difference does an 8.5 vs a 9 make to you? But it makes a huge difference to the actual developers creating the application.

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Shalbatana

Hey, thanks for the insight. From a developers point of view I understand it a lot better now. I was aware that FF was going to squelch the version numbers, perhaps I had forgotten though. So perhaps I'm calling out mozilla as an example when they are not necessarily the best one.

That said, I still feel the whole thing has a branding edge to it. To consumers, a new release should entail major leaps forward. Incremental releases should entail minor tweaks, bug fixes and refining. New implementations should be left for the major numbers. That workflow format is just as logical from a dev standpoint as anyting else, and it fits a consumer format as well.

 

I think consumers (myself included) would be just as happy to see FF 8.9, 8.10, 8.11, etc. for what was done. That is just as much a rapid release schedule than simply jumping to the next whole number.

So perhaps I'm calling out the dev teams for setting low goals for each revision? No I don't think I mean to do that....I don't know what I'm saying. Maybe I'm just saying that there should be more communication and consideration to such things. (no wait, that would mean a marketing personnel in a development meeting....I REALLY don't wish that). So what AM I saying...

I just know that when I see a new version with very few NEW features, I instinctively respond that someone's trying to sell me on something that's not fully deserving. And if I think it, and as you point out, others think it, well then perhaps it's something that needs to be addressed. not from a developer standpoint, but from a mozilla foundation standpoint as a whole. Hiding version numbers might help that, but I'm not convinced it's the only answer. Branding and consumer confidence is a big part of Mozilla, and has been a big part of it's support throughout the years. They need to consider that, and avoid anything that's going to be considered by some to be sneaky, shifty, or self-serving like the plague.

As far as what's in a number...numbers, like roses, invoke emotion, and like names, have power.... and I personally can't wait for Firefox rev 42!

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win7fanboi

you are assuming people that are commenting about version #s have 'no development knowledge'. Call it Rapid Release, Agile or Jabberwocky. The simple fact is they starting pushing updates a lot frequently. They then started copying chrome by doing automatic minor version updates. The time it took from FF 3 to get to 4 and from 4 to get to 8 is about the same if I recall. I know it's just a # but it also means they are pushing out stuff faster and after one of minor 3.x release they introduced memory consumption issues. People don't want another Chrome from FF, they was solid, stable FF with add-ons that they love. They should stop copying Chrome.

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livebriand

I just downloaded it and haven't noticed any chances in particular. The speed, which was already good enough, hasn't changed.

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Cregan89

The performance improvements are specifically in JavaScript execution. 'Type Inference' can significantly improve performance in complex JavaScript powered HTML5 applications. But those performance improvements are basically unoticeable in your average website (MaxPC, Google, etc.) since the amount of JavaScript in most websites executes in a small fraction of time compared to the time it takes for the browser to request the various HTML, CSS, and image files and then lay them out on your screen. Basically, your browser is only as fast as the slowest component, and on 99% of websites, that component isn't JavaScript execution.

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