File Sharers Easily Skirt European EffortsTo Blockade Pirate Bay

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kamikaji

The one thing that LEGAL digital services have yet to offer, is access to ANY movie or TV show that you want, whenever you want. With services like Netflix, Hulu, HBO GO, etc., the user is restricted to a pretty tight window of a very slim library of content that is available for viewing at any given time.

This is due to the cable companies, media giants, publishers, distributors, and studios all having EXTREMELY draconian and strict licensing and content consumption agreements with each other. Thus, it is impossible to have every movie and TV show (or close to it anyways) on a digital streaming service that is affordable. The end user only ends up being allowed to watch what the industry wants it to watch at the given moment.

The only way to do it, then, is to buy the WAAAAAAAAY overpriced Blu Ray discs (In addition to a compatible player), or pirate the content. Especially for most older or niche/indie films, too, pirating seems like the only option because of lack of funding for extensive distribution. So, pirating, although there is some guilt for not paying the makers, seems A LOT more sane money wise than spending $20-$60 on EACH blu ray disc.

Another factor in the favor of pirating media, is that your consumption of said media is MUCH more customizable and convenient. You don't have to deal with ridiculous DRM, lack of subtitles in some cases, and limited viewing options because of region lockout, device limitations (AHEM...Netflix on Ubuntu....COUGH), and other varying problems and inconveniences. When media is pirated, the user is FREE to consume their media however they want: on any device they want, with any subtitles (official or fan made), with various audio selections, different resolutions, viewing OFFLINE (because of bandwidth cap or lack of internet connection), with selections of different or obscure languages thanks to avid fans, in ANY region, at any time.

So, you see, people of the internet, if the big, fat, bloated, ignorant Big Media corporations were to be destroyed, and media made AFFORDABLE, CONVENIENT and similar to pirated content in accessibility, I am sure MANY MANY MANY more people would be willing to pay. But no, they have to deceive and lie to us, and inconvenience us at every turn, unfortunately.

END RANT!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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vrmlbasic

The Pirate Bay has been good to me, but lately they're almost self-censoring with their slavish devotion to magnet links. I wouldn't mind the ridiculously slow time to download the torrent file from peers, but my client (the last "good" version of uTorrent) has horrid magnet file support. Shoot, even the newest uTorrent is inadequate for magnet links.

My version of uTorrent doesn't ask me where to save magnet-linked files, it just tries to stick them wherever, and I have a directory hierarchy on a whole separate drive to adhere to. Having to stop the torrent and adjust its download location in the brief moment between the .torrent being downloaded from peers and the actual data of the torrent starting to download is grating, to say the least.

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zaphodbeeblebrox 42

i am *this close* to 3.14rating im so sick of more than 90% of my games library not working (steam or otherwise) when my net goes down. correct me if im wrong but isnt it more or less legal to crack your own games? for example. i have dues ex on steam. net doesn't work. i cant play it. so cant i 3.14rate it and technically it is ok because i already own it? if so. i have alot of games i need to crack i already own >:)

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vrmlbasic

Steam irks me, especially as it often includes the developers' hellish DRM on top of their own (cough Dark Athena cough), but it is possible to play games offline for a few days, just by clicking a button, which you can now do _after_ the internet has gone down.

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zaphodbeeblebrox 42

im guessing that was sarcasm about playing it offline for a few days. the only way i know of to make offline mode work correctly is AFTER u have it in online mode u restart if in offline mode and make sure u don't hit "go online" when u start it up from there on out."

but ya i agree with u on the whole. drm on top of steam drm. f*cking annoying.

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vrmlbasic

No, it wasn't sarcasm. When I run PeerBlock, Steam cannot connect as I haven't added exceptions for it, and don't plan to, and Offline mode lets me play the game.

Steam tries to connect, says it can't, and then gives me an "offline mode" button which, when clicked, allows me to play games without issue. I'm told it only lasts a few days, but I haven't tested that yet.

I don't have to go online and do something special as so I can play offline, at least not with the only games I'm playing via Steam.

This also works when I legitimately have no internet connection, though as far as Steam is concerned, running PeerBlock is the same thing.

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TerribleToaster

I hear tell of a Skyrim modder (God bless them) over at TheNexus who created a Steam offline mode patch that will let you play any steam game that you own, offline, without the need to connect to the internet to confirm that you are offline.

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livebriand

That's EXACTLY what I was expecting to happen! Now if they did something logical like offering their content at a reasonable price, without DRM, people not pirate so much. All anti-piracy efforts ever do is piss off people who play by the rules, while not affecting the pirates.

Anyway, change your DNS server to something like 8.8.8.8 and 8.8.4.4 (Google DNS), and you ought to be good to go.

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szore

BALLS DEEP

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winmaster

"TorrentFreak notes that would-be Pirates can simply boot up the Opera browser and activate Turbo mode."

Dammit! That was my preferred way of getting around school blocks. Now that attention has been brought to it, it will not last long.

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vrmlbasic

Your school allows Opera to be installed on its machines? More progressive than mine ever were, and probably ever will be.

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Havokr505

I actually prefer buying games on steam rather than torrenting, if there not on steam though, we have a problem. maybe if games didnt cost an outreageous amount of money and were so ANTI this and that, we would have an issue....well im off to play counter Strike.

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NavarWynn

A principle of good leadership I've oft heard is "Never issue an order you know will not be obeyed." Apparently governments don't understand good leadership.

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wolfing

as long as they keep equaling # of torrent downloads = # of lost sales they'll keep battling thinking they're losing billions of $ which is obviously not the case.

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szore

Someone who finally gets it.

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stradric

Yes, Napster. Before that IRC, Usenet and FTP (which are still in use of course). Before that, recording music from the radio or copying cassettes (remember those radios with dual cassette decks designed for making copies?).

I saw a graph, though I can't remember at the moment where, that showed the introduction of iTunes (i.e. legal, easily accessible means of obtaining content) did more to stop piracy than any anti-piracy measure ever taken. And yet content distributors still prefer to force legitimate users to jump through hoops so they can gouge us for profit.

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0ly1r3m@1ns

it makes me sad that iTunes is the only practical (legal) was to buy all your music, evan at that its piss poor since they either charge 1.30 per song (ridiculous!) or 1$ and it encrypted and only works on an iShit (well with some tinkering it will but lets assume you're a computer noob for now) not to mention the fact apple is a terrible company and shouldn't be supported for moral reasons, Nexus ban any one?

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Belboz99

It's worthy to note that Napster and other peer-to-peer file sharing services were hosted exclusively on Download.Com, a part of CNet.

CNet was founded in 1994 by a Fox Network co-founder Kevin Wendle and former Disney Creative assiciate David Baker. It was bought out by CBS in 2008.

But more to the point, AOL.com, MSN.com, CNet, and ZDNet all promoted MP3 sharing software years before these same companies decided to tear them down and sue every college kid for using them.

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tekknyne

Thanks for the good info. Oh the irony!

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duncansil

As the article says, the only effective deterrent to piracy (IMO) is offering legal alternatives at market appropriate prices in as little DRM encumbered format as possible.

Simple, but toxic to the malodorous middle-men.

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tekknyne

You mean the distribution people who provide nothing more than barriers to these services should be expected to accept less money!?!?

Well said!

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