Exclusive! Spy Shots of a Socket 1160 Lynnfield Motherboard

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-it-

wish AMD would make something remotely competitive to Intel. then maybe intel wouldnt be doing this and make it all 1 socket

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Keith E. Whisman

It seems to me that multiple socket types will drive up production costs as they can't produce all their processors on the same tools. They can't devote all of their consumer processor fab tools to one processor family. No they are going to have to divy it up. This means processor shortages and price increases. They are just trying to ensure that there will be a limited supply and thus higher prices for their chips all across the board. This sucks intel. Just quit it. You don't need a seperate socket. You have done it in the past. Look at the core 2 processor. The same socket for dual core as the quad core chips use and also some Xeons as well.

Look at socket T 775 and all the processors that they make cheaply at will because they use the same tools to make all these different processors. They are doing this on purpose and it's to line their pockets and screw the little guys that wont be able to afford it. Computing is about to get alot more expensive.

I'm not going to stop using Intel as long as they are the fastest and most powerfull but this is certainly a ding on their record for me. Intel this is going in your personell folder. You wont get that promotion you've been asking about.

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Budgetperson

This is really sad. First of all users (especially non-pwr users) are gonna be really confused about all the different names and sockets. Second, is x58 going to be only high end? What if your going to upgrade when the socket (lga1366) gets cheaper? Will it get cheaper? 

And what price level will this socket be for... I wonder what Intel's definition of high end is....

www.upbeatpc.com

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-it-

argh. this is nuts. i can normally handle the namings and all the diffenert sockets, but this is just confusing. i think intel's trying to make us nuts with these different sockets, names, and incomaptibilites

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Keith E. Whisman

Oh god.. Why don't they just get it in there heads to quit making different sockets. I mean come one. What if you want to upgrade later? You have to buy a whole new motherboard. That sucks.. Is it just going to be the supper dupper Extreme Edition CPU's that get the different sockets from the mainstream?

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sirphunkee

Pardon the silly question, but is that a SO-DIMM slot next to the 4 regular RAM slots....??

EDIT: now that I've been turning that over in my head all evening, I'm guessing that maybe it's for dedicated VRAM for the on-die GPU in Havendale? 

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jwalch.hawk

I saw that and thought the same thing.  I went a Google-ing.

Apologies if linking to an outside site infuriates any MaxPC folks inadvertantly...

http://forums.techpowerup.com/showthread.php?p=939615

 

First three posts in particular (even more particularly, the third one).  It seems that they are speculating that it's SO-DIMM on this demo board as a way of implying that the same basic layout/functionality is going to be put in their notebook boards as well.

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sirphunkee

ahhh...interesting, thank you.  I'm not sure if I accept it as the final answer, but interesting nonetheless.

They also mentioned the other thing I was wondering about...where the hell was the southbridge? (no separate one needed on this platform, it seems)

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nclaughlin

I can't tell if that's a microATX or a full ATX board, but it looks like it's microATX.  Is it possible that the socket 1160 is intended for microATX motherboards while the socket 1366 is for full ATX?  Also, a previous article on a 1366 motherboard mentioned that socket 1366 motherboards looked crowded if you included six memory slots.  Might this problem provide incentive to move to the extended ATX form factor?  Or do we need some other motherboard form factor (as well as new cases)? Has this been discussed?  Thanks, Niels

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Skiplives

It's an extended ATX board, look at the standoff placement.  This is a demo board, really meant for testing, especially if that SO-DIMM is for laptop testing.

I really don't like the change in pin-out.  If it was just that the 1366 pin-out was going to be meant for the server market, so that multiple chips could work on the same board, then I would understand.  If this is also limiting memory bandwidth then it has more of an affect on gamers and power users. 

I see why Intel is making this chipset though.  It is cheaper to make, probably uses fewer layers (see cheaper), and allows for an easier fit in small form factors and laptops.  OEMs don't mind that they cut down on your ability to upgrade, they'd rather you buy a new machine anyway, from them of course.

The question is, are the lower clocked i7s only going to be available in the 1160 pin-out?  Or will they also come in 1366 versions?

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