"End of an Era" as Intel Chairman Craig Barrett to Retire in May

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winmaster

I remember back in the day. My Windows 95 machine. 8MB of RAM. 800MB hard drive. I don't know what the processor's model number was, but it was Intel. What's funny is that machine booted faster than any other computer I've seen since. 

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The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

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PeterJ

Being old enough to remember these things, the first general purpose microprocessor from Intel was the 4004. This was 4 bit processor with a fixed instruction cycle time.  I used this for decoding radar information in a project. I had an assembler that was loaded in via papertape and ran on a 4004 SDK board (I believe this meant Single board Development Kit) which ran an Intel 4004 with a teletype connected (an ASR33, who remembers those...). I believe the 4004 was released in 1971 or 1972 and was originally designed for a calculator. Then the 4040, 8008 and then the 8080 followed. Interesting times. I wrote a cross compiler for the 4004 and 4040 to run on an HP machine which used PL 1!!

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Marcus_Soperus

Thanks for correcting the historical record. I pulled the description of the 8080 from the Intel history website, but it doesn't surprise me that earlier chips have gotten short shrift. BTW, I remember those teletype and paper tape reader rigs - I tried programming in BASIC using a time-share connection. That was so frustrating that I'm surprised I still like computers!

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It's amazing how illogical a business built on binary logic can be.

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Keith E. Whisman

That was back when IBM PC's And Clones had a Turbo button that ran the CPU at it's rated mhz and with the turbo button off the cpu ran at a lower mhz and voltage I believe. It's been a very long time now.

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zeringue

My first machine was an original IBM XT with an 8088 processor, and of course the best IBM keyboard with the functions keys on the left side. I still use two IBM microswitched keyboards.

I remeber doing AutoCad PC board layout on two screens one green and the other color with a hercules graphics card.  Was amazed by the better regeneration times the 8087 math co proeccesor provided with AutoCad.  

The performance boost from when we brought home the 80286 was awesome what a difference. 12Mhtz. wow.

Long Live Intel. 

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Marcus_Soperus

I'm still using an IBM AT-style keyboard because of its excellent touch. My next primary keyboard will probably be one of the Unicomp keyboards with Windows keys (Unicomp bought the Lexmark keyboard division [formerly IBM's keyboard division] in 1996). Unicomp keyboards still use the IBM buckling-spring design that lets you know you actually typed something.

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It's amazing how illogical a business built on binary logic can be.

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ProtoJMB

Yeah I remember the "IBM Compatible" era. However we used pure IBM's for the first couple years.

Our first computer was an IBM PS/1. It had an Intel 486 processor. Cannot remember the speed at all, but that was our first Intel processor. Right after that was the original Pentium in our IBM Aptiva, that was 150MHz. Then for a a while we were off the mainstream processor track with a bunch of comptuers that used shoddy Celerons. So we pretty much skipped the "Slot era" of Pentium II and Pentium III. Got back on the mainstream station when I built my first computer, which had a 2.0GHz Pentium 4. Now I run with a 3.0 GHz Pentium D. I am planning on upgrading to the 2.4 Q6600 Core 2 Quad.

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Keith E. Whisman

Me too! I had an 8086 and 8088. Back when computers not built by IBM were known as IBM Clones.

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whitneymr

I go back to the original IBM PC with an 8086 and 64k of memory. Man I'm getting old.

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