C++ Rebooted with Parallel Algorithms and Better Performance

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Morete

CodeGear Delphi by Embarcadero Technologies for the win!

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dgrmouse

The auto keyword is HUGE.  Aside from being generally easier to read, there are some fringe cases with templates where things just don't work without it.  The declspec stuff is naturally related to auto, and the other stuff has been readily available in third-party libraries forever. I'm not a big fan of moving threading into the standard library, since it's almost as ugly as IO in terms of portability. Different machines handle things like blocking IO differently, and system-specific libraries like POSIX and the Windows API are already in place and extremely effective.

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Trooper_One

It's been awhile but C++ really was the foundation of my programming school days.  I don't think it'll disappear anytime soon as it is a solid language with a huge use database, not unlike COBOL and FORTRAN (both of which are old but are still kicking around worldwide in large numbers).

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DJSPIN80

It's about time!  I like how the new spec FINALLY includes lambda methods, which makes writing uninterrupted code blocks fun.  I like how they finally have a for_each loop and parallelization.  Good to see that C++ is still going strong, even if the syntax looks horrid.

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dgrmouse

for_each has existed in the standard for over a decade, along w/ the STL.  There's lots of functional-style stuff there - you should give it a look.  Unfortunately, the Boost-style lambda expressions are kludgy and inelegant compared with their functional counterparts - largely because of the differing delineations between first-class objects.

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QuadraQ

I use C++ at work everyday, so it's far from a dead language. In fact there is probably more code written in C++ than in any other language (with the possible exception of C itself). Learning C and C++ were smart moves because a large selection of languages are supersets (like Objective C and C#) or are syntactically related (like Java and JavaScript).

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rayatwork05

C++ has been and will continue to be the most dominant programming language for last 10-15 years...

i do market research in this industry and am surprised to see you write  "JavaScript, Python as being trendier"

they def are not. Sadly Fortran runs #2 to C++ because it has such a big/old user base.

C++ & Parallel code ftmfw

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stradric

I wouldn't say JavaScript or Python overshadow C++ simply because they are scripting languages.  JavaScript is limited pretty much to the web browser (though MS does have jscript, which is very similar and can be evaluated outside of the browser like Python or Perl).  Certainly there are features of Python and JavaScript that are more appealing than C++ -- like generic types.  So it does seem that C++ is trying to join that party, and I welcome the change.  I've always loved C++.  It's so rewarding to build applications using it, but it's a hard sell in business when managed code like C# can be used to build applications in less than half the time.  In any case, it's nice to see the evolution of such a great language and I look forward to learning and trying out the new features.

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dgrmouse

C++ has had generic types, containers, and algorithms in the standard for over a decade.  JavaScript has been available as a standalone language since the 1990s under the name ECMAScript.

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AndrewEgel

C++ will always have a special place in my heart. It was the first programming language I learned. Glad to hear its added some features. The smart pointers has me interested.

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dgrmouse

They're just classes with integrated reference counters.  Check the Boost implementation, that's what they're based on.

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FuriousDre

:O, awesome! I love C++ xD Been self-teaching it tomyself for a few years now.

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Andacious

Awesome! So much has happened since 1998, glad they finally updated this.

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TerribleToaster

Cool beans.

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Cregan89

Coool Beans.

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