Boston Dad Bribes Teenage Daughter $200 to Suspend Facebook

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iheartpcs

One of the worst aspects of society today is that people believe they should be rewarded for simply doing the right thing.

Paying her to do what she should be doing anyways (not being on FB all the time and focusing on her studies) is not good parenting.

She will grow up to be one of those people that will expect gas money for driving her friend to a doctors appointment or something lol.

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siramic

This post is better and more thoughtfully stated (IMHO) than the ones you posted below. In thinking about it the last couple of days, and with this reasoning you posted, I can see on your points.

There is a difference between getting paid for agreed upon household chores in learning about responsibility and handling money in that way, cp. to doing what should be morally and "normally" done, and is for her best interest in situations like FB time. Yet those can be the hard and tactful parenting skills in teaching kids and teenagers.

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jonnyohio

At first I thought "is he nuts!?", but then I read it was HER that came up with the idea. Having a daughter around the same age, I think I'd be impressed if mine came up with an idea like that...he has an enterprising daughter.

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tony2tonez

So does blocking the IP address on your router. I would agree to financial compensation if her grades were bad and she improved them dramatically. That's called working for it.

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DerfMcWoowoo

Great job Paul Baier! You are a great dad.

@khalladay The girl IS learning personal responsibility. She has figured out how to take advantage of human behavior to help her achieve her goals. Part of taking responsibility is understanding what you need to do, and then figuring out a way to do it. We all need to figure out what motivates ourselves and then use that knowledge to achieve our goals/desire.

Very cool!

PS People who question Mr. Baier's parenting style don't understand how good parenting works. This is a fantastic style!

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iheartpcs

Yes, later on in life, when her husband catches her cheating, she can negotiate a payment plan to not cheat anymore.

Awesome parenting.

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khalladay

I guess everyone has their own opinion of good parenting, part of mine is teaching my children not to manipulate (or take advantage of) others for personal gain. Another is teaching them you cant just throw money at your problems.

To each their own :)

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nightsfire

your comment made me laugh, manipulate? take advantage of? how is she doing such she agreed to give up her facebook for money yes but now she has money to go to movies or hang out with friends or get stuff that she might need. the same money i am sure her dad would have given her anyways but now makes her give something up in turn for the money seems like a great idea to me.

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siramic

agreed. What I'm impressed with is that she knew even at a young age that Facebook was distracting her away from something better, her education, her studies. She initiated it herself. Manipulating her dad, I don't think so, he sounded wise enough, it was more in the vein of bargaining. It is something she will be doing the rest of her life, when she looks for a job, buys a car, etc...the "if and then" principle.

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iheartpcs

Yes, later on in life, when her husband catches her cheating, she can negotiate a payment plan to not cheat anymore.

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siramic

lol, good one, not even close to being analogous ;-)

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khalladay

So technically he's not bribing her, he's just agreeing to her terms. If the kid truly came up with this feeling the need to not be distracted by social media, maybe it'd be better to teach her some personal responsibility by not paying her to do it. Nobody pays me to do the right thing for myself, welcome to adulthood.

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iheartpcs

+1

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jimmthang

Why does this story kind of remind me of this? http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TtqZ2XbxQws 

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