Is the Blackberry Torch a Disappointment Out of the Gate?

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maseone

...only fagbars use at&t

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Baer

But, when it is time for a new phone in a few years I will strongly consider a Droid of some kind. As for the Torch, I have no intention of ever going back to AT&T so I have not even looked at it.

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k11k

So much better then those Storm. Tested out at the store, once they leave ATT and get them on another provider I will get one. Plus the nice thing is I wont be the one paying for the service or the phone. Even if the bill don't go to me, "I still care about the provider".

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cr8n

I have a Bold 9000 and love it, but i'm not one looking to spend every waking minute glued to my phones screen like a lot of people I see.  The torch looks like a good fusion of touch screen and keyboard, which appeals to me.  

 

To the guy that hates his BB, I wonder what model you have?  Not all BB's are created equal and can be compared to top of the line phones.  My Bold multitasks just fine and web pages load quickly for me.  I'm not a fanboy but just pointing out that I don't have android/ifone envy in the slightest.

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zaternine

I would think that bad sales would partly be due to the fact that who would want to switch to a crappy service like ATT, if the phone were available on other carriers it would have done better im sure. Just imagine if the original ifone got released as a CDMA and GSM for all major carriers im sure everyone would be all over it.

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DogFace

The reason companies like RIM and Apple focus on GSM first is because that's what practically the whole world uses (except Japan, Korea and half the US).  Putting out a GSM phone first means they can start seling outside the US right away.  RIM will get around to making a CDMA Torch, it just might take a while.

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Asterixx

I see ReCaptcha works well keeping the spammers at bay...

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cdowley

There's not much that can be done about humans that sit and post, though.

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Caboose

Could do like Gizmodo sites, and have to have your account approved by a moderator (or have more moderators. I'll apply for the job!) before you can post comments that can be seen.

You can post comments, but nothing is displayed to anyone except moderators. Once you get the OK, then you can post. And I think access is quickly revoked should you turn out to be a troll or spammer.

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Asterixx

I've been a Blackberry owner for a little over a year, but I won't have another one. I have been disappointed by this phone's lack of apps, and the entire OS is dated, unstable, and slow. The phone crashes at least once a week, often when I'm talking on it or about to answer it (only a battery pull makes it work again, and it takes a good 10 minutes to boot up). It has zero multitasking abilities - if I'm doing something with it and it decides to send or receive a data packet it completely freezes until that packet is finished (the incoming and outgoing arrows flicker, but the screen, keyboard and trackthingy lock up). Surfing the web with the archaic browser is agony. Pages are not only poorly rendered, they're poorly rendered V-E-R-Y S-L-O-W-L-Y. I have a 3G modem for my laptop and hit 5-6MBPS. The same network on the Blackberry is worse than dialup speeds. The ONLY thing I like about the phone is the qwerty keyboard.

The very moment I can upgrade my phone I'm switching to Android. I like the looks of the iPhone but I refuse to pay the apple tax and also refuse to support Apple's closed platform.

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violian

Couldn't have summed it up any better.

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DogFace

I know RIM is trying to branch out into consumer devices, but their strength is the enterprise.  Lots of companies with millions of users are locked into Blackberry.  They may not update their phones as often as 20-year-old hipsters, but they generate bread-and-butter revenue for RIM.

Blackberry isn't going away.  RIM will keep doing what they've been doing, and when enterprise clients get around to updating their handsets, many will by the Torch.  It's just that IT directors don't go out and buy 1,000 new handsets on launch weekend.

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big_montana

Except most IT dpeartments do not purchase handsets directly for their employees (at least mine does not) as we offer a $500 handset reate every 3 years, and we do support Blackberrys, iPhones, Androids, Palm Pre's and Windows Mobile devices on our network. Not to mention iPads. A lot of out mobile workforce has already made the switch to either the iPhone or the Android platform, with the majority of those prefering Android. Those that have not switched are not yet eligible for reimbursement on a new smartphonne as yet. Sure, some will stay with Blackberry, but I think the majority will move to Android. Both the Andorid and iPhone render HTML emails better than a blackberry does, has more internal storage, faster processor, better web browser, larger screen (which is the biggest reason givern for dumping Blackberry) and is a more robust better built phone. Face it, RIM has had plenty of quality issues lately, it is not just having outdated hardware that has killed them.

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DogFace

How do you figure that most companies do not buy handsets?  Almost all my clients (mostly big financial companies) buy their own handsets, and they collectively account for tens of thousands of employees.  They do it because they want to standardize on a few products, they want to control how employees use their phones, and they use Blackberry enterprise servers.  Some smaller businesses let users choose their own devices, but not many big companies.  In fact, many of my clients' employees carry 2 handsets, their company Blackberry and their own "cool phone" like an iPhone or Android.

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Caboose

"Except most IT dpeartments do not purchase handsets directly for their employees" My workplace buys the handsets for employees. But only managers get blackberries. Sales team get standard cell phones, everyone else gets nothing.

"and we do support Blackberrys, iPhones, Androids, Palm Pre's and Windows Mobile devices on our network. Not to mention iPads." That sucks. It's one thing having to support one type of smartphone, but having to support a whole bunch can get difficult I imagine.

 

I think there's going to be a number of businesses that stick with Blackberries, as that's how their infrastructure is setup, plus 99% of users hate change, and if the new item isn't the same as the old item, they hate it! Oh boy do they hate it...

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Cache

The Torch feels like it was meant to be a hybrid device--something with a touch screen that still retained the familiarity of a solid keyboard in an effort to draw together different styles of user.  I haven't been able to play with OS yet (and likely won't until my aging Storm v1 gets it this fall--IF it lasts that long), but I am genuinely concerned for RIM.

The cellphone market is vastly different from the world that RIM grew up in--phones are more like computers than phones, and RIM is not a computer company.  RIM has failed to network with other companies for exclusive content and the result is a lackluster apps experience mirrored by rather mediocre hardware.  Their technical insight has produced smart phones that at best match the middle of the pack from the previous generation. 

The Torch is the unfortunate end result of a policy of inattention to detail, a complete misunderstanding of popular use of smart phones, a lack of cultural and social understanding, and ultimately a dated design.  RIM isn't even looking at marketing itself as anything more than a corporate tool, and people are going to want a phone that can handle their work and liesure activities.  Rim barely makes use of what is out there to connect with online--and so far everyone else is doing it better.  Maybe OS6 will bring a little zest to a worn-out ride, but it only will delay the inevitable.

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addyct

I don't think we should really be comparing Blackberry devices with Android or iOS, IT's a corporate device at it's heart, and a large amount of those users aren' the type to rush out and get a new phone on the first day. This may very well be a success, but a different kind of success.

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EchoFive

Sorry RIM but you dropped the ball on the Storm II.

 

I was forced to go with Android and I must say while the Torch looks better, you cant hold a candle to Android OS.

 

I suspect you have lost many other followers recently as well.

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cdowley

... except for the minor detail that I can't stand AT&T and refuse to use them as my service provider.

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crazitrain02

I ditched RIM months ago, so I know it's just a matter of time before they end up like Palm if they don't do some MAJOR changing up in their business plan.

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p309

Unfortunately, we are stuck with Blackberry for a while- we are in the same boat as mentioned above: large corporation running a Blackberry server that buys the devices for employees' use. And these devices have just not been a good product. The default browser on the Tour is atrocious, and the followup Bold is no better. The trackball is gone, thank goodness, but we have yet to evaluate the Bold's trackpad. We are usually a bit behind, as you can see-- we have just begun the refresh of the 8830 devices, and those that are still in service probably will be until they fail. In the meantime, we looked forward to the new models, only to find that there isn't much new. Not much to get excited about: same lousy browser with fonts that must be a 1 point, camera with not so good quality, the inexplicable failures (as mentioned above), the horrendous startup times. I dread having to reboot a Blackberry Tour or Bold; it takes a good part of 10 minutes. The good is good, and unchanged: reliable mail service, and overall, the Verizon network has been good to us. I can see us moving away from Blackberry if they don't improve- the negatives mentioned above are big ones, and timeburners for the admins and techs. Hours a day spent booting Blackberry devices, cleaning trackballs, troubleshooting stop errors, etc. is just too much, and an overhaul is overdue.

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