Bigfoot Networks Releases another Killer NIC

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TheDorkSide

I've been a net admin/sys admin for 10 years and I'm nowhere near the magnitude of PRICK that guy is. Every environment is different. Your mileage will always vary no matter what "controls" you put in a "situation". As far as this NIC goes. I think it's superfluous and overpriced. I don't use onboard NICs often. I prefer to use a separate Intel GB NIC. I always tend to get better more consistent performance that way.

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457R4L

I don't care much for this version as the old card had the ability to plug in a usb hard drive and download bittorrents without affecting cpu utilization.

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i7_DOMINATION

This is straight up bullshit and another way to rip off the enthusiast PC gamer. First of all, the normal NIC card can generate throughput speeds around 1 gigabit (assuming the internet used is that fast). Ping depends on several factors; what's running on the PC, what's using the network bandwidth, and the settings on the computer itself, as well as how far away you are located from your ISP.

A $129 "killer NIC" will not lower your ping by a noticeable amount. Your money is better spent on either getting a faster internet connection, optimizing your network settings, or buying a better video card. 

 

 

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FIX THE GODDAMN FILTER!! IT'S WORSE THAN FUCKING OUTLOOK. 

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orgus

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orgus

Yeah very beautiful, but all of the above is completely useless unless some "extras" aren't taken care of first. Let me explain: this NIC has indeed some nice specs, but to take full advantage of it's features we have to do some network job first. A decent Structured Cabling deployment is A MUST. Cat 5e cabling handles 10/100Mbs dataflow at 100MHz, Cat 6 cabling handles 10/100/1000Mbs dataflow at 250MHz, those are okay, but nowadays the standard in Structured Cabling is Cat 6A which runs at 500MHz and handles some 10Gps dataflow in optimum conditions, that my friends is brutal, of course STP is recommended over UTP to prevent signal attenuation. Anyway, then comes the proper and flawless Cat6 Jack punching job and certified Cat6 patchcords. This NIC would work nice under Cat 6 cabling and that's it, no more, no less. Of course cabling is just one component of the network solution, we also require a decent Managed Layer 3 Cat6 Switch with decent Routing and QoS capabilities (CISCO anyone?), you know, some smart RIP or OSPF routing tables and traffic management depending on how big the network is. So now you know, Cat6 is the network for this NIC, forget about Cat 6A speeds, leave that to Pro Nic's not widely available to the masses yet. Yes, you guessed right: I'm a Network Engineer.

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austin43

CAT 5E can handle gigabit.  Either way though, this NIC won't give you significant results over your motherboard's built in NIC.

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orgus

Of course it can, but under extremely controlled and ideal situations, which NEVER occur in a normal real-life basis my friend, so for that matters let's be realistic and point it's capabilities on everyday use. And I totally agree with you, that this fancy NIC offers no significant advance compared to a standard decent average NIC. I personally wouldn't bother to buy it.

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austin43

We can run gigabit through our house over our cat 5e.  What controlled and ideal situations are we talking about here?

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orgus

Wow, then I pressume besides the Cat5e cable you also have GigabitEthernet NIC's (probably some Hawkings hardware) and a GigabitEthernet Router or Switch (DLink???) and obviously fully tested all of the above with, say a Fluke DTX, focusing on NVP signal attenuations under an specific sequence (TSB-95 for T568-B or A) and low ACR-ELFEXT values to obtaining constant Gigabit strings to actually backup all your statements!!! If so, then I shall congratulate you for making such a nice and pro networking job at home. You don't see that every day, usually people just buy GigabitEthernet stuff, plug it in and allucinate they run GigabitEthernet networks. Outstanding.

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austin43

I realize you have to have gigabit NIC's in order to transfer at gigabit speeds between PC's, along with gigabit router/switches.  I'm not stupid.  If that is an "controlled" situation then yes I guess I  do have a nice and pro networking job at home :).  Gigabit switches and routers are becoming the norm, so I don't see how it's so far fetched.

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orgus

I totally agree with you, few people take the time to actually take care of all the elements involved in a network implementation (regardless of it's speed), they usually buy the stuff and that's it, they hardly mess with routing tables, QoS, proper jack punching, proper patch panel implementation, testing with a DTX and stuff like that, but yours seem to be a well implemented one, excellent. Now, the main reason why we are here was that little fancy NIC, and i believe the consensus was not to bother buying it, not because i'ts a bad product -it isn't-, but because it's simply not worth buying. It's a gamer's NIC, probably a serious gamer should test it and post some results, just to satisfy our curiosity don't you think? Anyway, congrats for the good network job, keep it safe, always use fixed IP's, WPA2 encryption, hidden SSID and MAC filtering, there is always the next block geek who believes he "knows his stuff" just to brag about it and starts a brute force attack with his Backtrack LiveCD injecting packets and stuff... those are annoying.

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IFLATLINEI

No wonder why gamers LAG so much and try to blame the servers for ruining the rest of our gaming experience putting all their faith into "plug and play" products like this. It doesnt help that even Network Engineers dont even know what the heck they are talking about. Pffft controlled situations. LOL Home networks are controlled situations.

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orgus

"Home networks are controlled situations".... Ignorance is a bliss, ain't it?

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DOOMHAMMA

I didn't even know this product was needed. Would I even need something like this if I already own a quality motherboard like the Asus Crosshair IV Formula 890FX?

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timlider

Id like to see benchmarks and comparisons between the Killer Nic, An Intel or other manufacturer Add in Nic Card and the on board Nic.  I have been thinking about purchasing one, but it is hard or impossible to see the difference.

Also, will the card work in a free PCI-E 16 slot.

 

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austin43

PCI-E is designed for backward compatibility.  You can use a PCI-E x1 card in x1, x4, x8, or x16.  

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Arrakiv

Reviews have started popping up o nthe 'net... but yeah, you can use the card in any PCI-E slot.

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Peanut Fox

Considering its price and its market, I think it should be sporting more than just one Ethernet port.

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devin3627

i am having a hardtime understanding this card, isn"t all NICs fast? 100 and 1000 base and what not?

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Arrakiv

What Aziobron said is correct, but it is also faster for another reason.

What you said is correct, in that NICs tend to support pretty good throughput numbers, which is normally what we think of when we think of 'fast'. However, when it comes to real time applications on the internet (gaming, VoIP, video chat, remote desktop, etc... etc...) throughput is important only in the sense that each application needs enough bandwidth to run. After that, it is all about latency, which is a measure of how long it takes for a packet to go from one location to another.

So, increasing your throughput is like increasing the storage of your vehicle, so that it can carry more at any given time. Improving your latency is like putting a new engine into said truck, so that it goes faster. Since nothing will happen on the server until your truck 'arrives' so to speak, how fast it is going in an online game means much more than how much it happens to be carrying.

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aziobron

an external nic takes the network load off the system and the card handles it, so the system has less of a load

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