Beware of Mail-in-Rebates (Seriously this Time)

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mikeart03a

I've generally never liked mail-in rebates myself, even when I was selling products with them back in my retail PC vendor days. I've never once gotten a mail-in rebate paid out to me. I sent one by registered mail for a $50 rebate on my old 4.1 altec lansing speaker set that I bought to make sure that it arrived on time (a week before the expiry date). It made it on time and they still said that it arrived late... so screw any retailer that still uses MIRs

- mike_art03a
IT Technician
Gov't of Canada

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auwingr1

If a retailer has to use rebates to capture my hard earned dollars, then he's failed. I've been burned countless times by rebates and rebate companies. If you can't offer an instant rebate, then count me out.

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Colt725

I got the great notebook at a fantastic price, with rebate. In fact it came with two rebates, one ($) from the manufacture and one ($$) from the retailer. I mailed both rebates within 3 or 4 days after my purchase. The ($) manufacturer rebate must have gotten to me in what seems like 4 weeks. I had almost forgotten about the retailers rebate check and when I remembered it I checked the web site and nothing so I wrote the retailer. They replied that they just got the rebate and it was post marked too late for me to received the $$. I was pissed and wanted a photocopy of the envelope, which I did not get. I kept replying through their web site and finally they said to call them. I did and long sorry made short. I received my ($$) rebate but DAMN that took some work.
I don't want to have to go through this each time just to get what was promised to me.

Colt725

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ahenkel

Is that the price of the product you purchased usually drops lower than the rebate offers by the time you get the rebate. Also the endless loops they make you jump through are designed to make people just give up.

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Wildebeast

I don't like the idea of giving a multi-million dollar company a short-term loan of my cash, for which I have to give them copies of information they might/should have collected at the register, when I paid.

The bigger companies actually are usually more reasonable & reliable than the smaller ones, but they really should just give you the rebate at the cash-register.

I guess it's petty, but I think if they had to fill out a page of paper-work, clip a UPC, & photocopy the receipt,  for each purchaser of their product --they wouldn't bother staying in that line of business, either.  It's like a much more annoying form of "coupon clipping," without all the silly ads from the Sunday paper [which can be entertaining] mixed in.

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uknowit90

I dunno about you guys, but I don't find following directions too hard, and, thus, have never had a problem with a mail in rebate. 2 Asus rebates, a Patriot rebate, and a Symantec rebate just to name the most recent, have all come through without a hitch. Although, I guess I could be one lucky son of a gun...

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JMG760

I have received some successful MIR, mostly $10 but aint no big deal. I always try to avoid them but if its a product I really want and it has a MIR is awesome. But then again the chances are 50-50 cause some will not be delivered to P.O. Boxes. I would rather want the store where I purchase the product to give me the $10 MIR by taking back all of the necessities to process the MIR. It would be a lot easier but all we can do is dream rite.

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animal113

There seem to still be some companies that handle them properly, in the past year or two I must have submitted 6 or 7 rebate forms to Corsair and BFG for rebates on RAM, PSU's and Video cards and I never once had a problem. I've got one sitting on my desk right now that I'm about to send to eVGA for $50 off a video card, fingers crossed .....

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The Relic

I rarely have had a problem with rebates per se (I try to avoid them, but sometimes that isn't an option for me). The only time I recall having a problem was back in the late 90s when I got my first 56k modem. The company conveniently went belly-up after I sent in the rebate offer (it was only $10), but it was a bit of a pain at the time.

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icebird

Mail-in Rebates must always be avoided.  Assuming you've danced precisely to their tune, your chances of getting a check are, obviously, slim.  It's not worth the time, effort, worry, and ultimately the financial loss.

10 years ago you could be reasonably certain you'd get one, and the hoop-jumping was considerably less complicated.  Now I am always careful to never purchase a product advertising a MIR.  Let the money do the talking.

MIR are just another gimmick to get you to buy impulsively without realizing your true cost.

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Tekzel

I actually disagree with most of your points.  I don't avoid MIRs, I just do not let them factor into my purchasing decision at all.  I consider them a gamble, and to date I have recieved every single rebate I sent in for.  Maybe I have been lucky, or maybe its because I follow the instructions exactly to the letter.

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Ghostryderflyby

Anything that requires that you jump through 17 hoops, do the hokey pokey and fill out 11 forms in triplicate to get your own money, should be avoided like the plague. I detest rebates and will always take the product that has a genuine low price, over a moderately lower rebate price on another product. I am 1 for 3 on rebates, with one being payed out, one being declined because I sent a copy of the receipt instead of the original (I had to keep the original for warranty per the product warranty) and the last inexplicably not being paid for any reason, and Newegg offering me $30.00 of my next purchase instead, which was never honored because they lost record of the offer. My point? Avoid rebates like the scam they are!

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Nick5324

I've always avoided big mail in rebates, I think the biggest one I've ever done was $40 on a video card.

I've only had a problem once.  I don't remember the product or rebate amount, but I got a post card saying my submission was invalid.  I called them, started with "I recieved a post card....." and couldn't get anything else out b/c the CSR instantly said "That was sent to you in error".  He asked for a number that was printed on the post card and I got the check in a week.  The post card said you had to respond in 10 days to dispute their claim of invalid, so I figure it was a scam to catch people not responding right away and screwing them on their rebate.

Staples Easy Rebates are by far the best, no cutting out UPC's, no mailing of anything.  Still, I'd avoid anything that is a good deal only if the rebate comes, and I'd avoid larger $ rebates.

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devin3627

I think mail-in rebates should have fines and a little more enforcement. It's been a year and two monthes and my brother still never got his $70 for a motherboard.

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Paul_Lilly

Have your brother file a claim with the Better Business Bureau. By doing so, I had a company finally make good on a $75 MIR (also for a motherboard) nearly three years after the fact.

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GenericBob

The BBB idea is good advice. I've had a problem with mail-in rebates only once. It was on a Soyo motherboard. I contacted two places: the place of purchase (Micro Center) and the California State Attorney General's office. Because Micro Center carried the product, it was responsible for the rebate ultimately and paid the rebate amount. (As a result, I'm very loyal to Micro Center, by the way.) The CA AG's office also added my complaint to the long list of complaints against Soyo, and I got a letter about the state taking legal action. It's true that the squeaky wheel gets the grease.

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devin3627

 

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Tekzel

Having a little trouble there fella?  Maybe you didn't send in the mail in rebate for the keys on your keyboard.

...

I amuse myself, and that is all that matters.

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devin3627

 

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