AMD Tries Hand at Making DDR3 Memory Modules

11

Comments

+ Add a Comment
avatar

athlon11

Does this mean that AMD is just making modules with other companies chips or are they mking their own DDR3 chips, putting them on boards and selling them as Radeon memory?

avatar

Marthian

Ultra Pro Gaming line (DDR3-1600, 11-11-11 latencies)

Entertainment Series (DDR3-1333, 9-9-9 latencies) 

wait, correct me if I'm wrong, but isn't lower Latencies better?

avatar

Paul_Lilly

You're right, lower latencies are 'better' (faster), but are typically trumped by higher frequencies, assuming your system can run higher frequency RAM. Latencies are generally not as tight at higher frequencies, hence why you see the 1600 kit rated at 11-11-11 and the 1333 kit running tighter at 9-9-9.

avatar

LatiosXT

Is this really a good idea? I mean, I can now effectively build a system that's just AMD (and for all intents and purposes, the motherboard, processor, and RAM is a system). I mean, if Intel tried the same thing, how would people react to that? Especially AMD?

The duopoly balance must not be tipped D:

avatar

d3v

Interesting that you should talk about Intel. One of Intel's biggest competitive advantages is the huge volume of sales it has. So maybe this is AMD's way of increasing its sales volumes in the hope of enjoying economies of scale and being able to compete better with Intel in the future.

avatar

Peanut Fox

You forgot AMD graphics.

avatar

I Jedi

"OCZ left the system memory market to focus on solid state drives in part because it grew tired of razer thin profits in the struggling DRAM sector"

Why must you bring back the pain, and reminded loss of a great manufacture to me, Paul? WHY!

Anyways, I have mixed feelings about AMD expanding into the memory market. On the one hand, they could bring out some pretty competitive products, which could help lower the price of memory modules even further than they already are now. Then again, if AMD expands into too many markets, I'm afraid their processor lineup will never again be on par with Intel's processors because of the divided attention and focus. AMD is only a generation behind, and they have managed to surpass Intel once before with their K6 series.

avatar

Paul_Lilly

I'm all for it, if for no other reason than as another revenue stream for AMD. Keep in mind the reason AMD was able to trump Intel, for a short period, was becase Intel was so reluctant to move away from its aging Netburst architecture, as if it was like putting down a family pet. Even then, content creation was typically faster on Intel hardware than on AMD's, and Intel's mobile Dothan platform was proof it could have competed on the efficient processing front, had the company not refused to pull the plug on Netburst. Once they finally did, AMD was once again relegated to second place -- sometimes a distant second -- and forced to go the bang-for-buck route to compete (you typically buy AMD hardware because it's a better value). On hindsight, purchasing ATI was probably one of AMD's smartest moves, one that some analysts weren't sure about at the time. I don't think selling memory kits will be nearly as big, but it's something, and after the ATI acquistion, AMD's earned the benefit of the doubt.

As to OCZ, you have my sincere apologies. And rest assured, whenever I bring it, it's like I'm kicking myself in the nuts, too.

avatar

I Jedi

While I agree that AMD has always been cheaper than Intel, so thus its most friendlier to desktop and mobile solutions, I think we're both selling AMD short. AMD was the first one to truly introduce a desktop solution for the 64 bit market with their Athlon 64. With Athlon 64 processors, they eliminated the need for the MCC, and they (Athlon 64 and FX series) made a direct connection between the RAM and the CPU itself. Not only increasing the speed to get information, but also maintaining support for 32 bit processing.

Intel's Itanium processors, at first, were solely for 64 bit processing, and aimed at the higher-end PCs. It's a shame that AMD didn't just take the 64 bit market right then and there when they had the chance. :/

It's just shocking how much Intel remains the top dog after some innovation from AMD.

avatar

d3v

They have their brand name. That's about it. Another American company slapping their logo on goods sourced from Asia.

avatar

Happy

Seems strange they would jump into this market unless they had something unique, special and advanced to offer.

Log in to MaximumPC directly or log in using Facebook

Forgot your username or password?
Click here for help.

Login with Facebook
Log in using Facebook to share comments and articles easily with your Facebook feed.