AMD Dismisses Intel's Thunderbolt

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Talcum X

LightPeak is a better name than Thunderbolt. 

We will see if it get odopted into mainstream.  Hard to beat a still evolving, well established USB market.

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LatiosXT

If there's one thing that kills Thunderbolt as a true peripheral device interface: 7 devices max. USB supports 127, Firewire supports 63. I already have a total of seven USB devices plugged into my computer: Mouse, keyboard, Wi-Fi adapter, Printer, Hub, Zune HD, and my Droid. Oh look, now I can't plug in my external HDD if I were on Thunderbolt. And before you go saying add more Thunderbolt controllers... do consider the motherboard real-estate they take up (on the MacBook Pro, it's about as big as the chipset itself).

Also it's only good for stationary peripherals. Otherwise serious planning would be needed to ensure two wires aren't coming out of your mouse.

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Caboose

USB 3.0 is backwards compatible with every single USB device on the market today. LightPeak is backwards compatible with... nothing. So, someone buy's a new PC that has USB 3.0 ports on it, and they plug in their USB printer, USB mouse and keyboard, iPod or Android phone. They'll plug in their USB camera. Maybe a card reader or a drawing tablet. And everyone is happy.

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ditchbeast

So could lightPeak lol Just because one end of the cable has to be the lightpeak connector doesnt mean the other end does. Having LightPeak would allow for backword compatibility just as easily with another cord.If thats your argument for not liking the technology then you kinda of burn your self with that comment.

LightPeak while suporting backwords connectivity would support "forwards" connectivity as in new tech that comes out as it supports double the speed of 3.0. So by your same rationale this would be better as it offers what you want and more..

You could argue, well there will be a USB 4.0 but thats going to require an entirely new standard, from USB 1 to 2 it took 4 years. 2 to 3 took another 8. the mainstream adoptation of 3.0 hasent even taken hold yet so you'll be waiting at least another 4 years for another standard and who knows how long after for adoptation?

 

 

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Caboose

So LightPeak and USB are interchangeable? I've not read that anywhere, could you provide your sources?

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schneider1492

It would be easy to build a usb hub with a Lightpeak controller. You could also make an adapter with a pci-e 3.0 controller and lightpeak controller to make an external video device. That would remove a lot of heat from the case and allow for better cooling. If nvidia built native lightpeak video cards you could daisy chain them so they each have there own box.

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stradric

I'm inclined to hate anything Apple does, but I actually think Thunderbolt is pretty cool (despite having a stupid name.  WTF is a thunder bolt?).

http://www.gizmag.com/thunderbolt-macbook-pro/17977/

It is compatible with USB via adapters.

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Caboose

Thunderbolt is just Apple's name for an Intel invention. The real name is LightPeak.

As for your question, "what is a thunderbolt?" Well, the dictionary can help you there.

http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/Thunderbolt

thun·der·bolt   [thuhn-der-bohlt]–noun 1. a flash of lightning with the accompanying thunder. 2. an imaginary bolt or dart conceived as the material destructive agent cast to earth in a flash of lightning: the thunderbolts of Jove. 3. something very destructive, terrible, severe, sudden, or startling. 4. a person who acts with fury or with sudden and irresistible force.

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ditchbeast

I have nothing that directly says it however there seems to be reference on the intel website and would make sense, as long as you have a lightpeak connector on one end then you can have whatever connector on the other, drivers pending.

  • Electrical or optical cables

Why would electrical cables be referenced in optics tech? And as per the above if shouldn't be that difficult.

 

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Caboose

Ok, so then I should be able to put an eSATA end on a USB cable (and vice versa). It can't be that difficult. They're both using copper wires, and both have a rectangular shaped end. Should be possible right? I don't have anything that says that it can be done either, but they both use similar cables.

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Mighty BOB!

Well they have VGA to DVI adapters and DVI to HDMI adapters, I don't see why they couldn't have a Thunderbolt to USB adapter.  It works with video streams and data, which to me sounds like they want to replace the existing cable/port types (HDMI, DVI, eSATA, USB, FireWire, etc.) and have everything run Thunderbolt.  Adapters would be a logical transition if someone wanted the tech but didn't have the hardware in their computer, but had a peripheral that uses Thunderbolt.

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ditchbeast

USB 3.0 is more of the transitional step and not for Large scale adoptation.

USB 3.0 Supports up to a maxuimum of 5Gb/s tranfers, Thunderbolt is up to 10Gb/s, thats double the potential speed and its only a first gen product... that being said, the current copper connectors on devices can only handle up to 2Gb/s so you there isnt really an advantage until devices are built to support the Thunderbolt connector.

USB 3.0 will have a place for the next year, maybe year and a half and will still be useful for a few years but Thunderbolt or a similar tech will dominate.

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ditchbeast

USB 3.0 is more of the transitional step and not for Large scale adoptation.

USB 3.0 Supports up to a maxuimum of 5Gb/s tranfers, Thunderbolt is up to 10Gb/s, thats double the potential speed and its only a first gen product... that being said, the current copper connectors on devices can only handle up to 2Gb/s so you there isnt really an advantage until devices are built to support the Thunderbolt connector.

USB 3.0 will have a place for the next year, maybe year and a half and will still be useful for a few years but Thunderbolt or a similar tech will dominate.

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Scootiep

So you're assuming there will never be a USB 4.0 or higher? When introducing new standards, backwards compatibility is HUGE. That's what makes USB so appealing. People can still use their USB 1.0 devices if they simply can't let go of them. Lightpeak doesn't offer that. Also, in it's current copper form, lightpeak is inferior to USB 3.0. Depending on how long it takes them to implement true fiber-optic lightpeak, USB may have matched or even exceeded the 10Gb/s speeds of lightpeak.

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ditchbeast

USB 3.0 does not fully support the theoretical bandwidth of 4.8GBps, it doesnt even come close. I did some searches and the best that could possibly be gained is like 50% of the max speed for USB 3.0? And why do you automatically assume current USB devices would not be supported because of the connector, as outlined in a previous post, just because one end of the connector is strickly lightpeak does not mean the other has to.

Also, look at the adoption time lines for USB, it took double the time to get from USB 2 to USB 3 that did from 1 to 2. Based on this and adoptation rates you'll be waiting a few years before a revised spec even comes out! then you need to wait for companies to decide when it becomes financially viable before they start adding it directly to their boards.

All im saying is dont start holding you breath, you might be holding it a while...

 

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Jesterace

Personally I'll stick it out with USB3 even though I have an intel board and chip. 

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