Leaked Image Confirms 'System Reset' Feature in Windows 8

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szore

This screams horrible idea.

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cpuking2010

shouldn't take long to create a virus to activate this feature. poor microsoft, you'd figure they'd learn by now that people like breaking their stuff just to do it....

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RUSENSITIVESWEETNESS

I guess it's a little better than a reinstall off a disc, saving the time needed from format to finish. As long as nothing can stop it, it may actually be worthwhile. My worry would be viruses that adapt to this new tech to disable it or resurrect themselves after you've "pushed the button." Better still would be the ability to take a snapshot of a system AFTER installing your favorite software, and then be able to reset to that image with the push of a button. I've heard System Restore can do that (in theory), but I've never had it work out right in practice.

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OliverSudden

This.  Very much this.

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scoop6274

how about the os drive being two 18 gb 10k rpm server scsi drives in a raid 0 and all other data stored on standard magnetic drives. quick boot, reliability, and data stored on other drives for ease of nuke and pave.

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elo231

  1. This feature is useless
  2. It does not magically solve all of your problem if you're fixing someone's PC
  3. You need to inform them, it will remove all of their software and they need to reinstall everything again.
  4. If they say it's a pain and aren't willing to reinstall, you can't use that "reset" switch
  5. User needs to get a habit of backing up data to another destination (external hdd)
  6. This feature does not protect from hardware failure, if HDD fails all data are lost!
  7. This feature is nothing more than a lazy method to reformat
  8. If it takes the same amount of time or longer to remove all programs, set Windows back to defaults while keeping personal files. It's better off to perform a clean install
  9. If this reset set Windows back to default while keeping programs and personal data, then it would be a great feature.
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someuid

Haha.  I look forward to the first "system reset" virus.

Seriously, the problem isn't the OS.  Its run-amok programs.  Microsoft should be putting in application virtualization that quarantines every program into its own little 'world' - all system files, program files, and registry entries it needs are rolled into a single file, which is loaded when the app is needed.

When you no longer need a program, just delete its instance and all of the programs modifications to your base OS are gone.

A few years ago, there were a few of these app virtualization programs running around, but they've since been bought up by other companies and rolled into their enterprise software, meaning they are out-of-reach for us home users.  Really frustrating if you ask me.

The second thing that needs to happen is better behavior on the behalf of software writers.  Every stinking little program I install always comes with a toolbar, or some update program that demands to be run on boot-up.  Curse you Adobe for putting in the Adobe Downloader on a fresh install of Flash.  Why do I need that horse crap?  Curse you Apple for your updater, and Bonjour, and trying to force your browser onto my system.

I've gotten so tired of it that when I built a new gaming computer, I installed just the OS, Avast, Steam and my games (plus Flash for Steam's needs) along with Chrome.  And that was it!  It still runs nice and fast - 30 seconds from a cold boot and I'm in a game.  And that is the way it shall stay.  One computer dedicated to games, and one computer for everything else.

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aarcane

That's a good idea, why not invent some universal updater software that ANY company can sign up for and use with their products, then mock them when they don't sign up.  then only ONE updater needs to be installed.

Oh yeah, everyone elses proprietary solutions are requisitely better and everyone else should be using theirs..

*facepalm*

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D00dlavy

++ for good idea and truth-spewing.

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andresau

With the advent of Windows Easy Transfer, fixing badly infected computers is already a piece of cake.

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dentaku

I've found that since Vista, OSes just don't gradually get slower or mess up like previous ones but a nice way to restore the OS is still good thing I guess, because people will always find ways to completely scramble their OS.

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D00dlavy

For my friends and family (and myself), I configure Windows just the way I like it, install essential applications and update / configure those, then Windows 7 system image over to an external drive or partition (if external drive isn't available).

This sure sounds better than a "reset" software switch.  No thanks.  I'd rather see more robust imaging in Windows 8.

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bpstone

Let me guess, still using Windows NT kernel in Windows 8? lol

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Neufeldt2002

In my experience, a good portion of the viruses and trojans come from personal files. Still, it is a step in the right direction.

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AETAaAS

Sounds good, but I'm wary of the phrase "keep user accounts and personal files". That could mean some of the clutter coming along for the ride (same reason I swtich off System Restore [bonus: extra drive space :p]).

I practice was mentioned and what I imagine most MaxPC readers do; a SSD for Windows and a secondary magnetic for all my files. Wipe the SSD whenever I want a clean start. :)

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blindhorizon

I have to agree with AETAaAS, i turn off system restore as well it kill drive space and for SSDs it would over time kill the drive.  to play devils advocate here though...yes sys restore can ba valuble tool..when it works right. there have been many times i have tried to use it and it dosen't work.  and a good computer user would have regulare backups of ther Hard drive on some kind of external backup drive not needed the system restore tool anyways.  just my 2 cents.

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Caboose

Ok, I'm trying to figure out how system restore "it kill drive space". You set the amount of drive space for system restore (minimum is 200MB) and thats it. Hard drives are so cheap now, 1TB can be had for $50. 200MB is nothing on a 1TB drive.

System Restore doesn't expand and start filling up all your free space. Once its set, then thats it. Honestly, its one of the best features in Windows XP, Vista and 7.

And if by "it kill drive space" do you mean that it destroys the hard drive, then I don't know where you got your info from but that is wrong.

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Neufeldt2002

I know that when ME shipped it had a bug that would eat up all the HDD space available. But that was ME, and it was fixed. I myself only use system restore on my C:\ partition.

Side note to MaximumPC staff, I agree with the others that publish to facebook should be opt-in, not opt-out.

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Caboose

That's all that you need it on anyway. There's no reason to have system restore enabled for any other drive/partition in your system.

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Caboose

"same reason I swtich off System Restore [bonus: extra drive space :p]"

I turn system restore down to the bare minimum. It's a very valuable tool and has made performing repairs so easy. Turning it off is just damn foolish!

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AETAaAS

Well, I personally have never been in a situation where System Restore would have helped; I keep my PC tight as a ship. I enabled System Restore when I was on XP, but never got around to using it. So ever since XP SP3 up till now, I have never used nor needed it.

I'm not recommending this as a policy because different people have different usages and expertise but it simply doesn't fit into mine. :)

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DDRDiesel

You seem to be forgetting that SSDs have a short write-to-drive life, meaning it can only be wiped or modified a certain number of times before it reaches End Of Life and becaomes nothing more than an expensive paperweight.  Just adding my two cents, is all

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AETAaAS

Yes, I was pleanty aware of the shorter lifespan of SSDs compared to magnetic drives when I bought mine. I was quite late in my adoption, only taking it on last year after I read sufficient support for SSDs on certain forums.

That's why I spent the least amount of money to get the greatest effect; a good priced 60GB Vertex2E to run my OS and programs where speed matters the most. And by god did it make a difference. :D

Now, SSDs are at a point where IMO, the price is ok and life is good. So by the time one dies, get the next gen one. Even now, the next gen SandForce controller SSDs (compared to my 2E) are selling. And like graphic cards; why not 'upgrade'? Only this time; theres a more legitamate reason to do so. ^_^

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D00dlavy

++

This is how real men compute.

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aarcane

Real men compute by manipulating the electromagnetic fields by way of adjusting finely calibrated electro-magnets to set the individual transistors in a flash drive to zero or one, and have no need of this reset feature.

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